Author Topic: The Greek connection  (Read 870 times)

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Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2018, 08:50:00 PM »

Offline PAOBoston

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i love when Greeks make pizza.
Fact. Greek style pan pizza is the best.

Also,  Cs blog seems to have a decent Greek representation!

I think the ship has sailed on the Antetokounbo bros. Giannis is and will be the best of the bunch. Thanasi was on PAO on Greece last time I checked but he's not really that good. Kosta should have stayed at school. Alexandros is probably best shot in getting a solid player but he's like 15.

« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 08:57:15 PM by PAOBoston »

Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2018, 09:06:02 PM »

Offline greece666

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i love when Greeks make pizza.
Fact. Greek style pan pizza is the best.

Also,  Cs blog seems to have a decent Greek representation!

I think the ship has sailed on the Antetokounbo bros. Giannis is and will be the best of the bunch. Thanasi was on PAO on Greece last time I checked but he's not really that good. Kosta should have stayed at school. Alexandros is probably best shot in getting a solid player but he's like 15.

Yep, Thanasi is nnowhere near an NBA player skillwise. Even in the Greek championship he is seen as a defense specialist,he hardly contributes offensively.

Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2018, 10:04:25 PM »

Offline kozlodoev

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Going by the American translation is definitely the easiest solution, so that's what I do.

For instance Giannis --> John

Georgios --> George

Haris (my name) --> Harry

etc.
Yes, but what about Panagiotis?
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Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2018, 10:06:03 PM »

Online Ogaju

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So much for Giannis can anyone tell me how the heck they changed a Yoruba name ADETOKUNBOH to Greek Atentokumpo????

Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2018, 10:13:23 PM »

Offline Alleyoopster

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I apologize then. Thank you guys for informing me of my ignorance.

So question then what is your Greek name and do you guys normally go by the American translation of your name when you live in America, or Greek origin when visiting America?

Realize this question was basically already answered. Thus, some of what I've written below is redundant.

No need to apologize. The English translation of his name is somewhat confounding to me and others.

I believe Americans pronounce his name Gee arn us. Typically, it's pronounced Yia knes (with a long e sound). And, is spelled Yianis or Yiannis, not Giannis.

More commonly you don't hear the "s" at the end of the name. Rather, it's said, 'Yiani'.

Since I don't read Greek news sources, I'm not sure if the 's' is left out in newsprint or not, or simply not pronounced. My feeling is it's written, not always pronounced. (I could be wrong here. if anyone knows please correct me.)

I know in America, Greeks more commonly say "Yiani", not "Yianis".

To answer your question.
The name Yianis is commonly translated into the name John in English. Most first and second generation Greeks use John rather than Yiani(s). However, it's not uncommon for first generation Greeks to be called Yiani when conversing within the Greek community. Some second or third generation Greeks use Yianis, but I believe it's relatively rare. 

Native born Greeks often go by Yianis instead of John. Thus, we have Giannis Antetokounmpo.


Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2018, 10:56:45 PM »

Offline Jvalin

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Going by the American translation is definitely the easiest solution, so that's what I do.

For instance Giannis --> John

Georgios --> George

Haris (my name) --> Harry

etc.
Yes, but what about Panagiotis?
;D ;D

I guess they can go by Panos. Certainly easier to pronounce than Panagiotis.

Thing is, many of those names are just formal versions of everyday names. Nobody uses them in everyday life.

For instance, Ioannis is the formal name for Giannis (=John). Likewise, Georgios is the formal name for Giorgos (=George). Nobody will actually call you Georgios. It's just what's written on your ID.

I guess Panagiotis/Panos is an exception. Plenty of people are opting for Panagiotis instead of Panos.

Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #21 on: June 20, 2018, 11:31:16 PM »

Offline greece666

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I apologize then. Thank you guys for informing me of my ignorance.

So question then what is your Greek name and do you guys normally go by the American translation of your name when you live in America, or Greek origin when visiting America?

Realize this question was basically already answered. Thus, some of what I've written below is redundant.

No need to apologize. The English translation of his name is somewhat confounding to me and others.

I believe Americans pronounce his name Gee arn us. Typically, it's pronounced Yia knes (with a long e sound). And, is spelled Yianis or Yiannis, not Giannis.

More commonly you don't hear the "s" at the end of the name. Rather, it's said, 'Yiani'.

Since I don't read Greek news sources, I'm not sure if the 's' is left out in newsprint or not, or simply not pronounced. My feeling is it's written, not always pronounced. (I could be wrong here. if anyone knows please correct me.)

I know in America, Greeks more commonly say "Yiani", not "Yianis".

To answer your question.
The name Yianis is commonly translated into the name John in English. Most first and second generation Greeks use John rather than Yiani(s). However, it's not uncommon for first generation Greeks to be called Yiani when conversing within the Greek community. Some second or third generation Greeks use Yianis, but I believe it's relatively rare. 

Native born Greeks often go by Yianis instead of John. Thus, we have Giannis Antetokounmpo.

The final s  is a "case marker".  So both forms with and without s appear, both in written and oral speech, depending on the role of the word in the sentence.

« Last Edit: June 21, 2018, 12:44:08 AM by greece666 »

Re: The Greek connection
« Reply #22 on: June 20, 2018, 11:41:29 PM »

Offline konkmv

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I think kostas could join his brother and go play on greece for pao... if he develops his game after 2-3 year he may try again in the nba.... i like sloukas and papapetrou as back up players from greece