Author Topic: Realities of the modern NBA  (Read 701 times)

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Realities of the modern NBA
« on: July 20, 2018, 12:06:22 AM »

Offline slightly biased bias fan

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Over 70% of NBA players have changed teams in the last 18 months. Including 15 All-Stars.

Sampling of Remaining Players from 2016-17 Opening Night Rosters:
Warriors 8
Mavs 7
Wizards 6
Spurs 6
Cavs 5
Jazz 5
Rockets 4
Kings 4
Bulls 4
Celtics 3
Lakers 3
Hawks 2
Clippers 1

Amazing and in my personal (fan) opinion, quite sad.

Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2018, 12:41:42 AM »

Offline tazzmaniac

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I count 4 for us: Horford, Smart, Brown and Rozier 

I don't think it is sad at all.  Some of the change is from good young players coming into the league.  Good player movement means teams have opportunities to make themselves better. 


Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2018, 03:03:11 AM »

Offline rocknrollforyoursoul

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I count 4 for us: Horford, Smart, Brown and Rozier 

I don't think it is sad at all.  Some of the change is from good young players coming into the league.  Good player movement means teams have opportunities to make themselves better.

I'm not sure what the OP means by "sad," but I do think it's sad in that it's dang near impossible to keep a good team together for a long time. I mean, the Warriors have hung onto their core for, what, 4 or 5 years (and miraculously added Durant)? But that's a rarity. It would be amazing if Boston could pull it off over the next 5-7 years.

Just when guys are getting really good, their rookie deals are running out and teams have to pay them a ton to keep them, and they also have to pay a ton to get good free agents. But if teams do that, they get into the luxury tax and the repeater tax. Things definitely seem geared toward producing a form of parity, in which no team is really good for more than 4 or 5 years, every year sees the rise (if not into title contention, then at least into playoff relevance) of at least a couple of teams (and the fall of a couple others), and it takes having a genius GM like Danny to be able to contend without having one of the league's top 2 or 3 players.

Good thing we have Danny.
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Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2018, 03:05:55 AM »

Offline CelticsElite

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Thatís just because:
-most teams are poorly managed
-most nba players arenít that good. Thereís a lot of journeymen
-thereís rules in CBA that make it expensive to keep some players, like those that are free agents after you signed them to  vet minimum
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 03:11:34 AM by CelticsElite »

Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2018, 03:15:26 AM »

Online Androslav

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More NBA realities:
Wolves, Suns, Bobcats, and Kings still suck, as they almost always do.

- You can give them top draft picks for years.
- You can give them cap space to use.
- You can give their GMs time to build the team without instant pressure
- They can even stumble upon a good trade in the process

...And they will still suck, they are rudderless and in the bottom 1/8th of existing NBA in this millennia (Suns since 2010).
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Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2018, 08:12:11 AM »

Offline Moranis

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It has happened before.  For example, the 1995-96 title winning Bulls only had Jordan and Pippen on the 1992-93 title winning team and most of the change over was before the 94-95 season as to start that year they only had Pippen, Armstrong, Perdue, and English remaining (Jordan joined at the end of the regular season). 

That was a title winning team that was blown up in the span of 18 months only to rebuild itself into a title winning team again.  The Bulls blew themselves up again after Jordan retired for the 2nd time as well.  Now it is a bit more widespread, but I do really think a lot of that was the cap explosion which just gave a lot of teams a lot of money that for the most part was wasted so teams then tried to get out of those bad deals.

Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2018, 10:16:17 AM »

Offline timpiker

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And the meaning of all of this?  Don't buy shirts with active players' names on them.  That's my take.  Oh, and enjoy it while you can.

Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2018, 11:26:35 AM »

Offline Bucketgetter

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More NBA realities:
Wolves, Suns, Bobcats, and Kings still suck, as they almost always do.

- You can give them top draft picks for years.
- You can give them cap space to use.
- You can give their GMs time to build the team without instant pressure
- They can even stumble upon a good trade in the process

...And they will still suck, they are rudderless and in the bottom 1/8th of existing NBA in this millennia (Suns since 2010).
Wolves are a playoff team now and their roster this year is similar to last year. So they don't suck. Also Bobcats don't exist anymore.
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Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2018, 07:21:29 PM »

Offline Big333223

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I get why it would be sad. Rooting for a team you've gotten to know and appreciate over years can be a deeper experience than feeling like you're rooting for hired guns. At the end of the day, we're all cheering for laundry but having guys that you come to like and appreciate can mitigate that a lot.

But the frequent changing does make the NBA exciting. And I'm hopeful the Celtics have a team in place that they can keep together for a number of years.
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Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2018, 07:28:30 PM »

Offline bogg

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The league wanted shorter contracts and tied the maximum size of extensions to the final-season salary amount of the current deal, and not the cap, in the last couple rounds of negotiations. This is really a product of what the teams have pushed for, not so much on the players. If you force a guy into free agency, he just might take a look around.

Re: Realities of the modern NBA
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2018, 08:41:51 PM »

Offline bdm860

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Over 70% of NBA players have changed teams in the last 18 months. Including 15 All-Stars.

Sampling of Remaining Players from 2016-17 Opening Night Rosters:
Warriors 8
Mavs 7
Wizards 6
Spurs 6
Cavs 5
Jazz 5
Rockets 4
Kings 4
Bulls 4
Celtics 3
Lakers 3
Hawks 2
Clippers 1

Amazing and in my personal (fan) opinion, quite sad.

I don't know if this is really that different than in the past.  Let's look at the same teams 30 years ago for comparison (so comparing how many guys on the '87 rosters were there in '89).

Warriors 6
Mavs   10
Wizards/Bullets 4
Spurs 4
Cavs   6
Jazz 7
Rockets 3
Kings 4
Bulls   4
Celtics 5
Lakers 7
Hawks 7
Clippers 2
« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 11:16:08 PM by bdm860 »

After 18 months with their Bigs, the Littles were: 46% less likely to use illegal drugs, 27% less likely to use alcohol, 52% less likely to skip school, 37% less likely to skip a class