Author Topic: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?  (Read 2849 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #60 on: July 19, 2018, 10:55:28 PM »

Offline smokeablount

  • Don Chaney
  • *
  • Posts: 1681
  • Tommy Points: 107
  • When my account was born, Mark Blount was our C :(
I think we have to get under the tax.

But Iíd much rather package Yabu, Nader and a top 55 protected 2nd rounder, if that works.
Give us this pick, Almighty Red
And forgive us our tanking
As we forgive those who tanked against us
And lead us not into the lottery
But deliver us from losing

-Sexyscottish

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #61 on: July 20, 2018, 06:49:32 AM »

Offline saltlover

  • Ed Macauley
  • ***********
  • Posts: 11230
  • Tommy Points: 2418
I, unlike many internet GMís, donít believe a team trying to win a championship should just dump a starting-caliber role player for nothing just to get under the tax. I rather have him ride pine all playoffs than have to turn to Semi or Yabu in a big spot.


If we stretch Nader, we are still about $1.67M above the tax for 14 players, not including Bird.

Salary dumping Yabu would get us below, but Iím not sure what Birdís number would be (under $1M keeps us under the tax), again for 14 players with zero salary to do anything during the season.

My guess is we stay put and become taxpayers, even for such a small amount. Then we have the $5.3M to play with during the season.
This is part of the issue actually.  Seems a shame to start the repeater clock (which is what we want to avoid more than the actual tax this year) for such a small amount.  Oddly, if we were way over then we might not be having this discussion.

While certainly it would be ideal to not be a tax team this year, itís more ideal to put the best possible team forward when a legitimate title contender.  If the tax is the price, and thus the repeater clock, so be it.

I've seen this point made by several people and in this case I do not think its the right way to approach this. First of all this team is gonna be good for a long time if we play it right, and to keep it together will require that repeater tax. So its not just the small payment this year thats the problem, its the fact you have to pay the higher rate a year earlier when you will likely be very expensive potentially result in 10's of millions of extra tax. Now if the owner shop is okay with that, then fine. But im skeptical, a historic tax payment which is possible is historic  because it almost never happens. And before everybody says "owner shipping says they will pay" I get it, but pay and pay HUGE are different. If you can get under it makes too.much business sense not to.

And thats before you in factor in other things like playing time, a more limited role, not enough ball to go around and I think it makes even more sense to trade Morris. On top of all that, I think he is massively overated. This team was overall worse with him on the floor last year, his defense comes and goes, his offense is in efficient and he NEVER PASSES THE BALL. Even the idea of him as insurance is overated, because if injuries happen and you reach the point where Morris is a crŪtical part of your team next year, you arent winning it all.

Now that doesnt mean you have to trade him now. You can wait and see how the team is going before deciding. Maybe Semi steps up and makes him expendable. Maybe the rotation shakes out such that he doesnt get a lot of playing time and you just dont need him. Maybe injuries happen and Ainge decides he does need him. But I think trading Morris is an obvious move.

Of course I am often wrong.

Look, I get it.  Iím a tax hawk and started a thread about why I felt Aron Baynes wasnít going to stick around because of the tax and that Smart would get a deal in the $12-14 million range.  I was half right.  I also am not a huge Marcus Morris fan.  I think heís a bit of a chucker who is prone to being a malcontent.  Heís not a must-have.

But despite not being a must-have, heís a guy we do have, and he fills a role at both ends of the court.  And especially come playoff time he could be highly useful.  If Kawhi shows up to Toronto, heís the type of player who would be a good defender against him.  The same would potentially be true in the finals against both Durant and Draymond.  And, despite having chucking tendencies, heís not a cipher on offense like some other options on the roster.  Even with a fully healthy roster, heís someone who would likely see 20-25 minutes a night against potentially conference final and NBA final opponents.  If youíre seriously trying to win a title this year, as the Celtics seem to be, you donít dump a player like Morris just to stay out of the tax.  Maybe you donít enter the tax to acquire him, but once in the roster, you kee the status quo.

I hear the common refrain of ďthe repeater tax will mess things up down the road and weíre set for years.Ē  I get where it comes from.  But it ignores the fact that Kyrie is a free agent next summer and this could be our best shot at a title for several more seasons, not to mention that Kyrie leaving takes the tax out of play next year.  Horford is also a free agent if he chooses.  And while Iíd bet on both staying, Iíd feel less comfortable with that bet if we lost a tight finals in 6 or 7, and it felt like we were a piece away having dumped Morris at the break (or now) to get under the tax.  Losing a tight series after management dumped a key reserve for cost savings is not the type of taste you want in either Kyrieís or Horfordís mouth entering free agency.

Meanwhile, the cost of the repeater tax is starting to get overstated.  Entering a year early probably costs the Celtics $15-20 million four years from now.  This is in addition to about $10 million this season (tax, some salary, and share of luxury tax revenues).  Itís not peanuts, but $25-30 million spread over a couple of years is perfectly affordable to a team that reportedly netted $100 million last year after revenue sharing.

Now itís a something else if Morris starts grousing about playing time and is a problem in the locker room, and/or if Semi passes him on the depth chart.  If Morris is your 10th-11th man instead of your 7th-8th man, thatís a different story and you absolutely do look to move him.  Or, obviously, if he gets hurt.  But where we are today, you keep him.  The Celtics have a shot at a title.  They should take it.
ďWhen an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien. The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.Ē

Leviticus 19:33-34

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #62 on: July 20, 2018, 06:54:48 AM »

Offline RockinRyA

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3378
  • Tommy Points: 434
I, unlike many internet GMís, donít believe a team trying to win a championship should just dump a starting-caliber role player for nothing just to get under the tax. I rather have him ride pine all playoffs than have to turn to Semi or Yabu in a big spot.


If we stretch Nader, we are still about $1.67M above the tax for 14 players, not including Bird.

Salary dumping Yabu would get us below, but Iím not sure what Birdís number would be (under $1M keeps us under the tax), again for 14 players with zero salary to do anything during the season.

My guess is we stay put and become taxpayers, even for such a small amount. Then we have the $5.3M to play with during the season.
This is part of the issue actually.  Seems a shame to start the repeater clock (which is what we want to avoid more than the actual tax this year) for such a small amount.  Oddly, if we were way over then we might not be having this discussion.

While certainly it would be ideal to not be a tax team this year, itís more ideal to put the best possible team forward when a legitimate title contender.  If the tax is the price, and thus the repeater clock, so be it.

I've seen this point made by several people and in this case I do not think its the right way to approach this. First of all this team is gonna be good for a long time if we play it right, and to keep it together will require that repeater tax. So its not just the small payment this year thats the problem, its the fact you have to pay the higher rate a year earlier when you will likely be very expensive potentially result in 10's of millions of extra tax. Now if the owner shop is okay with that, then fine. But im skeptical, a historic tax payment which is possible is historic  because it almost never happens. And before everybody says "owner shipping says they will pay" I get it, but pay and pay HUGE are different. If you can get under it makes too.much business sense not to.

And thats before you in factor in other things like playing time, a more limited role, not enough ball to go around and I think it makes even more sense to trade Morris. On top of all that, I think he is massively overated. This team was overall worse with him on the floor last year, his defense comes and goes, his offense is in efficient and he NEVER PASSES THE BALL. Even the idea of him as insurance is overated, because if injuries happen and you reach the point where Morris is a crŪtical part of your team next year, you arent winning it all.

Now that doesnt mean you have to trade him now. You can wait and see how the team is going before deciding. Maybe Semi steps up and makes him expendable. Maybe the rotation shakes out such that he doesnt get a lot of playing time and you just dont need him. Maybe injuries happen and Ainge decides he does need him. But I think trading Morris is an obvious move.

Of course I am often wrong.

Look, I get it.  Iím a tax hawk and started a thread about why I felt Aron Baynes wasnít going to stick around because of the tax and that Smart would get a deal in the $12-14 million range.  I was half right.  I also am not a huge Marcus Morris fan.  I think heís a bit of a chucker who is prone to being a malcontent.  Heís not a must-have.

But despite not being a must-have, heís a guy we do have, and he fills a role at both ends of the court.  And especially come playoff time he could be highly useful.  If Kawhi shows up to Toronto, heís the type of player who would be a good defender against him.  The same would potentially be true in the finals against both Durant and Draymond.  And, despite having chucking tendencies, heís not a cipher on offense like some other options on the roster.  Even with a fully healthy roster, heís someone who would likely see 20-25 minutes a night against potentially conference final and NBA final opponents.  If youíre seriously trying to win a title this year, as the Celtics seem to be, you donít dump a player like Morris just to stay out of the tax.  Maybe you donít enter the tax to acquire him, but once in the roster, you kee the status quo.

I hear the common refrain of ďthe repeater tax will mess things up down the road and weíre set for years.Ē  I get where it comes from.  But it ignores the fact that Kyrie is a free agent next summer and this could be our best shot at a title for several more seasons, not to mention that Kyrie leaving takes the tax out of play next year.  Horford is also a free agent if he chooses.  And while Iíd bet on both staying, Iíd feel less comfortable with that bet if we lost a tight finals in 6 or 7, and it felt like we were a piece away having dumped Morris at the break (or now) to get under the tax.  Losing a tight series after management dumped a key reserve for cost savings is not the type of taste you want in either Kyrieís or Horfordís mouth entering free agency.

Meanwhile, the cost of the repeater tax is starting to get overstated.  Entering a year early probably costs the Celtics $15-20 million four years from now.  This is in addition to about $10 million this season (tax, some salary, and share of luxury tax revenues).  Itís not peanuts, but $25-30 million spread over a couple of years is perfectly affordable to a team that reportedly netted $100 million last year after revenue sharing.

Now itís a something else if Morris starts grousing about playing time and is a problem in the locker room, and/or if Semi passes him on the depth chart.  If Morris is your 10th-11th man instead of your 7th-8th man, thatís a different story and you absolutely do look to move him.  Or, obviously, if he gets hurt.  But where we are today, you keep him.  The Celtics have a shot at a title.  They should take it.

Im sorry, but care to explain how the hell Morris became "prone to be a malconentent" He has always been a good lockerroom guy, despite him wanting a bigger role.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #63 on: July 20, 2018, 07:17:02 AM »

Offline saltlover

  • Ed Macauley
  • ***********
  • Posts: 11230
  • Tommy Points: 2418
I, unlike many internet GMís, donít believe a team trying to win a championship should just dump a starting-caliber role player for nothing just to get under the tax. I rather have him ride pine all playoffs than have to turn to Semi or Yabu in a big spot.


If we stretch Nader, we are still about $1.67M above the tax for 14 players, not including Bird.

Salary dumping Yabu would get us below, but Iím not sure what Birdís number would be (under $1M keeps us under the tax), again for 14 players with zero salary to do anything during the season.

My guess is we stay put and become taxpayers, even for such a small amount. Then we have the $5.3M to play with during the season.
This is part of the issue actually.  Seems a shame to start the repeater clock (which is what we want to avoid more than the actual tax this year) for such a small amount.  Oddly, if we were way over then we might not be having this discussion.

While certainly it would be ideal to not be a tax team this year, itís more ideal to put the best possible team forward when a legitimate title contender.  If the tax is the price, and thus the repeater clock, so be it.

I've seen this point made by several people and in this case I do not think its the right way to approach this. First of all this team is gonna be good for a long time if we play it right, and to keep it together will require that repeater tax. So its not just the small payment this year thats the problem, its the fact you have to pay the higher rate a year earlier when you will likely be very expensive potentially result in 10's of millions of extra tax. Now if the owner shop is okay with that, then fine. But im skeptical, a historic tax payment which is possible is historic  because it almost never happens. And before everybody says "owner shipping says they will pay" I get it, but pay and pay HUGE are different. If you can get under it makes too.much business sense not to.

And thats before you in factor in other things like playing time, a more limited role, not enough ball to go around and I think it makes even more sense to trade Morris. On top of all that, I think he is massively overated. This team was overall worse with him on the floor last year, his defense comes and goes, his offense is in efficient and he NEVER PASSES THE BALL. Even the idea of him as insurance is overated, because if injuries happen and you reach the point where Morris is a crŪtical part of your team next year, you arent winning it all.

Now that doesnt mean you have to trade him now. You can wait and see how the team is going before deciding. Maybe Semi steps up and makes him expendable. Maybe the rotation shakes out such that he doesnt get a lot of playing time and you just dont need him. Maybe injuries happen and Ainge decides he does need him. But I think trading Morris is an obvious move.

Of course I am often wrong.

Look, I get it.  Iím a tax hawk and started a thread about why I felt Aron Baynes wasnít going to stick around because of the tax and that Smart would get a deal in the $12-14 million range.  I was half right.  I also am not a huge Marcus Morris fan.  I think heís a bit of a chucker who is prone to being a malcontent.  Heís not a must-have.

But despite not being a must-have, heís a guy we do have, and he fills a role at both ends of the court.  And especially come playoff time he could be highly useful.  If Kawhi shows up to Toronto, heís the type of player who would be a good defender against him.  The same would potentially be true in the finals against both Durant and Draymond.  And, despite having chucking tendencies, heís not a cipher on offense like some other options on the roster.  Even with a fully healthy roster, heís someone who would likely see 20-25 minutes a night against potentially conference final and NBA final opponents.  If youíre seriously trying to win a title this year, as the Celtics seem to be, you donít dump a player like Morris just to stay out of the tax.  Maybe you donít enter the tax to acquire him, but once in the roster, you kee the status quo.

I hear the common refrain of ďthe repeater tax will mess things up down the road and weíre set for years.Ē  I get where it comes from.  But it ignores the fact that Kyrie is a free agent next summer and this could be our best shot at a title for several more seasons, not to mention that Kyrie leaving takes the tax out of play next year.  Horford is also a free agent if he chooses.  And while Iíd bet on both staying, Iíd feel less comfortable with that bet if we lost a tight finals in 6 or 7, and it felt like we were a piece away having dumped Morris at the break (or now) to get under the tax.  Losing a tight series after management dumped a key reserve for cost savings is not the type of taste you want in either Kyrieís or Horfordís mouth entering free agency.

Meanwhile, the cost of the repeater tax is starting to get overstated.  Entering a year early probably costs the Celtics $15-20 million four years from now.  This is in addition to about $10 million this season (tax, some salary, and share of luxury tax revenues).  Itís not peanuts, but $25-30 million spread over a couple of years is perfectly affordable to a team that reportedly netted $100 million last year after revenue sharing.

Now itís a something else if Morris starts grousing about playing time and is a problem in the locker room, and/or if Semi passes him on the depth chart.  If Morris is your 10th-11th man instead of your 7th-8th man, thatís a different story and you absolutely do look to move him.  Or, obviously, if he gets hurt.  But where we are today, you keep him.  The Celtics have a shot at a title.  They should take it.

Im sorry, but care to explain how the hell Morris became "prone to be a malconentent" He has always been a good lockerroom guy, despite him wanting a bigger role.

Oh, he certainly had his moments in Phoenix and when he was first traded to Detroit.  And then in his exit elinterview this season said:

Quote
ďIím just not sure,Ē Morris said. ďThereís going to be a lot of players next year, so Iím not 100 percent sure where I fit totally yet. Itís just something Iím still kind of wary about.Ē

https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/celtics/2018/05/29/whatever-happens-with-roster-celtics-will-start-from-position-strength/L28kAEKPLefzIHKx5c6RJJ/story.html

Overall I think it will work out, and itís why I advocate keeping him despite the tax, but Iím not going to be Pollyanna in regards to him.
ďWhen an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien. The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.Ē

Leviticus 19:33-34

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #64 on: July 20, 2018, 07:26:57 AM »

Offline Green-18

  • Gordon Hayward
  • Posts: 594
  • Tommy Points: 55
I, unlike many internet GMís, donít believe a team trying to win a championship should just dump a starting-caliber role player for nothing just to get under the tax. I rather have him ride pine all playoffs than have to turn to Semi or Yabu in a big spot.


If we stretch Nader, we are still about $1.67M above the tax for 14 players, not including Bird.

Salary dumping Yabu would get us below, but Iím not sure what Birdís number would be (under $1M keeps us under the tax), again for 14 players with zero salary to do anything during the season.

My guess is we stay put and become taxpayers, even for such a small amount. Then we have the $5.3M to play with during the season.
This is part of the issue actually.  Seems a shame to start the repeater clock (which is what we want to avoid more than the actual tax this year) for such a small amount.  Oddly, if we were way over then we might not be having this discussion.

While certainly it would be ideal to not be a tax team this year, itís more ideal to put the best possible team forward when a legitimate title contender.  If the tax is the price, and thus the repeater clock, so be it.

I've seen this point made by several people and in this case I do not think its the right way to approach this. First of all this team is gonna be good for a long time if we play it right, and to keep it together will require that repeater tax. So its not just the small payment this year thats the problem, its the fact you have to pay the higher rate a year earlier when you will likely be very expensive potentially result in 10's of millions of extra tax. Now if the owner shop is okay with that, then fine. But im skeptical, a historic tax payment which is possible is historic  because it almost never happens. And before everybody says "owner shipping says they will pay" I get it, but pay and pay HUGE are different. If you can get under it makes too.much business sense not to.

And thats before you in factor in other things like playing time, a more limited role, not enough ball to go around and I think it makes even more sense to trade Morris. On top of all that, I think he is massively overated. This team was overall worse with him on the floor last year, his defense comes and goes, his offense is in efficient and he NEVER PASSES THE BALL. Even the idea of him as insurance is overated, because if injuries happen and you reach the point where Morris is a crŪtical part of your team next year, you arent winning it all.

Now that doesnt mean you have to trade him now. You can wait and see how the team is going before deciding. Maybe Semi steps up and makes him expendable. Maybe the rotation shakes out such that he doesnt get a lot of playing time and you just dont need him. Maybe injuries happen and Ainge decides he does need him. But I think trading Morris is an obvious move.

Of course I am often wrong.

Look, I get it.  Iím a tax hawk and started a thread about why I felt Aron Baynes wasnít going to stick around because of the tax and that Smart would get a deal in the $12-14 million range.  I was half right.  I also am not a huge Marcus Morris fan.  I think heís a bit of a chucker who is prone to being a malcontent.  Heís not a must-have.

But despite not being a must-have, heís a guy we do have, and he fills a role at both ends of the court.  And especially come playoff time he could be highly useful.  If Kawhi shows up to Toronto, heís the type of player who would be a good defender against him.  The same would potentially be true in the finals against both Durant and Draymond.  And, despite having chucking tendencies, heís not a cipher on offense like some other options on the roster.  Even with a fully healthy roster, heís someone who would likely see 20-25 minutes a night against potentially conference final and NBA final opponents.  If youíre seriously trying to win a title this year, as the Celtics seem to be, you donít dump a player like Morris just to stay out of the tax.  Maybe you donít enter the tax to acquire him, but once in the roster, you kee the status quo.

I hear the common refrain of ďthe repeater tax will mess things up down the road and weíre set for years.Ē  I get where it comes from.  But it ignores the fact that Kyrie is a free agent next summer and this could be our best shot at a title for several more seasons, not to mention that Kyrie leaving takes the tax out of play next year.  Horford is also a free agent if he chooses.  And while Iíd bet on both staying, Iíd feel less comfortable with that bet if we lost a tight finals in 6 or 7, and it felt like we were a piece away having dumped Morris at the break (or now) to get under the tax.  Losing a tight series after management dumped a key reserve for cost savings is not the type of taste you want in either Kyrieís or Horfordís mouth entering free agency.

Meanwhile, the cost of the repeater tax is starting to get overstated.  Entering a year early probably costs the Celtics $15-20 million four years from now.  This is in addition to about $10 million this season (tax, some salary, and share of luxury tax revenues).  Itís not peanuts, but $25-30 million spread over a couple of years is perfectly affordable to a team that reportedly netted $100 million last year after revenue sharing.

Now itís a something else if Morris starts grousing about playing time and is a problem in the locker room, and/or if Semi passes him on the depth chart.  If Morris is your 10th-11th man instead of your 7th-8th man, thatís a different story and you absolutely do look to move him.  Or, obviously, if he gets hurt.  But where we are today, you keep him.  The Celtics have a shot at a title.  They should take it.

Im sorry, but care to explain how the hell Morris became "prone to be a malconentent" He has always been a good lockerroom guy, despite him wanting a bigger role.

Oh, he certainly had his moments in Phoenix and when he was first traded to Detroit.  And then in his exit elinterview this season said:

Quote
ďIím just not sure,Ē Morris said. ďThereís going to be a lot of players next year, so Iím not 100 percent sure where I fit totally yet. Itís just something Iím still kind of wary about.Ē

https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/celtics/2018/05/29/whatever-happens-with-roster-celtics-will-start-from-position-strength/L28kAEKPLefzIHKx5c6RJJ/story.html

Overall I think it will work out, and itís why I advocate keeping him despite the tax, but Iím not going to be Pollyanna in regards to him.

I also believe that things will work out with Morris.  He expressed fair concerns given the level of talent on the roster.  At the end of the day his job isn't to examine lineup combinations and distribute minutes. 

Brad will find a way to play Morris between 22-25 MPG in a high impact role.  Ideally he sees a spike in efficiency with better talent around him.  I don't think it's unreasonable to project 10 PPG for Morris on 46% from the field and 37% from three.  I think he will be fine with this on a Finals contender.  Morris will have every opportunity to find a larger role with a new team after next season.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #65 on: July 20, 2018, 10:06:14 AM »

Offline timpiker

  • Bill Walton
  • *
  • Posts: 1270
  • Tommy Points: 81
Option 1:  part with 2nd rd pick and maybe some cash

Option 2:  pay full 5,375,000 salary, but keep the 2nd rd pick

or Option 3 - keep him, go for 18.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #66 on: July 23, 2018, 09:34:36 PM »

Offline rondofan1255

  • Bailey Howell
  • **
  • Posts: 2100
  • Tommy Points: 42
rather stretch Nader and trade Yabusele for cap space

Pretty sure that this does not get C's under the luxury tax threshold. 

Didn't realize that thanks!

Interesting that Nader was just traded in a salary dump. Wonder what's next!  :D

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #67 on: July 23, 2018, 10:05:37 PM »

Offline nickagneta

  • Global Moderator
  • James Naismith
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 33166
  • Tommy Points: 5417
rather stretch Nader and trade Yabusele for cap space

Pretty sure that this does not get C's under the luxury tax threshold. 

Didn't realize that thanks!

Interesting that Nader was just traded in a salary dump. Wonder what's next!  :D
I am guessing what is next is not good news for Yabusele Celtic fans.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #68 on: July 23, 2018, 10:32:03 PM »

Offline otherdave

  • Jayson Tatum
  • Posts: 354
  • Tommy Points: 47
  • takes.....MAKES!!!!
C's now stand at 14 players/contracts (assuming Purvis is cut).  Any player traded out (including Yabu) will have to be replaced with a new player coming in at probably a minimum of 1.4 or 1.5 million.  Remember undrafted players count towards tax as 1.5 mil even they are only being paid rookie min at 838k.

So trading Yabu doesn't get C's under the lux tax.
"And so when we started winning, it was really cool. The thing I still remember, when we won the title [in 2008], I looked over and Tommy was crying. And I was thinking: He's the true definition of what a Celtic is. And he's the best. Tommy means the world to me."     Doc Rivers

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #69 on: July 23, 2018, 10:33:02 PM »

Offline bellerephon

  • Jayson Tatum
  • Posts: 320
  • Tommy Points: 25
rather stretch Nader and trade Yabusele for cap space

Pretty sure that this does not get C's under the luxury tax threshold. 

Didn't realize that thanks!

Interesting that Nader was just traded in a salary dump. Wonder what's next!  :D
I am guessing what is next is not good news for Yabusele Celtic fans.

Does getting rid of Yabu's salary move them under the tax threshold?

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #70 on: July 23, 2018, 10:50:26 PM »

Offline nickagneta

  • Global Moderator
  • James Naismith
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 33166
  • Tommy Points: 5417
rather stretch Nader and trade Yabusele for cap space

Pretty sure that this does not get C's under the luxury tax threshold. 

Didn't realize that thanks!

Interesting that Nader was just traded in a salary dump. Wonder what's next!  :D
I am guessing what is next is not good news for Yabusele Celtic fans.

Does getting rid of Yabu's salary move them under the tax threshold?
I believe it does.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #71 on: July 23, 2018, 11:01:52 PM »

Offline DefenseWinsChamps

  • Bailey Howell
  • **
  • Posts: 2381
  • Tommy Points: 432
Given that the Cs would have two open roster spots if they traded Yabu for a draft pick, while only being 1 million shy of the luxury tax, I don't think Yabu is probably the first guy on the chopping block right now.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #72 on: July 23, 2018, 11:02:10 PM »

Offline saltlover

  • Ed Macauley
  • ***********
  • Posts: 11230
  • Tommy Points: 2418
rather stretch Nader and trade Yabusele for cap space

Pretty sure that this does not get C's under the luxury tax threshold. 

Didn't realize that thanks!

Interesting that Nader was just traded in a salary dump. Wonder what's next!  :D
I am guessing what is next is not good news for Yabusele Celtic fans.

Does getting rid of Yabu's salary move them under the tax threshold?
I believe it does.

Yes, but not by much.  The Celtics arenít going to go until the buyout season with only 13 players, so expect Yabu to stay until February at least.
ďWhen an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien. The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.Ē

Leviticus 19:33-34

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #73 on: July 23, 2018, 11:21:09 PM »

Offline ETNCeltics

  • NCE
  • Kyrie Irving
  • Posts: 934
  • Tommy Points: 105
JMO, I think they'll make a move to get below the tax this year. Getting in the repeater tax a year early and also losing out on a share of tax revenue could cost several million $. If you were Wyc and Co, would you pay all that just to keep Morris or Yabu?  Morris is mediocre in every way, and Yabu hasn't shown he's even that, at least not yet.

If Kyrie, Smart, JB, JT, Hayward, Al all average only 30 minutes, Baynes gets 20 or so, Theis gets a little on some nights we play teams with 2 decent bigs, Rozier gets 15-20, there isn't going to be 20-25 minutes for Morris, and his comments a few weeks ago show that he's noticed that as well. That's to say nothing if Semi or Yabu warrant some minutes (assuming Yabu isn't gone and either can find a 3 pt shot). If Semi can even find a hint of a 3 pt shot, Morris is Audi 5000, and it isn't even a judgment call.

Re: Marcus Morris: better to trade or stretch?
« Reply #74 on: July 24, 2018, 02:18:06 AM »

Offline droopdog7

  • Rajon Rondo
  • *****
  • Posts: 5148
  • Tommy Points: 344
How does dumping Yabusele get the celts under the tax?  Iím seeing a salary of about 2.6 mil which doesnít seem to be enough.