Author Topic: Robert Williams(Merged Threads)  (Read 42359 times)

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Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #60 on: June 30, 2018, 02:34:14 PM »

Online DefenseWinsChamps

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Quote
A man with a shorter limb can be expected to accelerate the knees quicker, all other things being equal;

Be real how many guys with short legs have you seen jump well, it has nothing to do with jumping but helps in bench press.

Dr J, Jordan and a lot of NBA jumpers have long legs and shorter torso.   The key part is to have a longer calf than a thigh that gives you more leverage.  You look at the great leapers in the NBA and most of them have this build.  Williams look to have this build too.  Note small guys can possess longer legs than torso too.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjB677grfvbAhWan4MKHTHHBwsQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.concordmonitor.com%2FDon-t-get-carried-away-with-Williams-just-yet-18374562&psig=AOvVaw0Mhwyr9kZVsnbVN2NThTWP&ust=1530447065793002


Quote
Long-levered athletes tend to express their strength much more successfully on the playing field than in the weight room.  Many times they are stronger outside the lifting room, too. For example, Michael Jordan at one time had a startling vertical jump and was very strong, yet when compared to a person his same weight and a foot shorter he has a large disadvantage in a parallel squat and I doubt if you would ever see him setting any lifting records

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/bodystructure.html

In a way it’s funny - on Wednesday I gave my Kinesiology class their joints exam; and no matter how much I warn them to read carefully and check their work, predictably two or three students will read “radioulnar” where it says “radiocarpal”, etc., etc. You did not respond to what I actually said.

 What I’m saying is actually very simple. The key part is, “all other things being equal.“   It is simple physics:  longer tibias and femurs have more inertia to overcome.

When you say “jump well” you seem to be talking about how high - but notice that I was referring, along with the P3 biomechanics guy, to acceleration at the knee.

Seriously, please post and explain your expertise more. I want to learn more about your view of athleticism. I'd love to see some in depth analyses of the draft's athletic testing.

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #61 on: June 30, 2018, 04:26:25 PM »

Offline smokeablount

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They were short centers with vertical and Russell had length and era-Parrish and Mchale did not have the tools of Robert Williams neither were explosive or elite vertical-nether were bouncy
And i'll keep my expectations where I want them.-Quit stalking and attempting to use semantics while fully understanding the gist.Your attempts to discredit are blatantly obvious-Bill Russell had the right idea.

I guess you ve seen him play, right? Full games (plural) not just highlights...

I remember another recent pick with very interesting body measurements... Fab Melo...

If someone said about Doncic, 'I remember another recent Euro pick... Mario Hezonja', what would your response be?

Because whatever it is, that's how many of us would react to your Fab Melo / Robert Williams comp.


i did not compare him to Melo because ,i repeat, do not know Williams!

What i said is that claiming someone as a possible legend because he jumps high and has big hands is not very smart as recent picks like Fab Melo have shown.

The difference with Doncic is that i have seen him play . I watched him every week the last two years. I am not a scout so my opinion could be completely wrong and Doncic ends up the new Milicic. Still this is based what i saw and what he did in other leagues while Williams is proclaimed possible legend because of his physical tools. That is way i asked (and never got an answer) if the OP has seen him play enough to draw this conclusion

Maybe just reading the measurements and make assumptions about a player is saver than watching him play.

I’ve watched him play. His defense and rebounding are for real. And his physical measurements aren’t Fab Melo like, they are Dwight / DJ like. That’s not the same. It’s hard to say what he will be because his college system is nothing like ours, but everyone has a right to be excited we got him at #27.
Give us this pick, Almighty Red
And forgive us our tanking
As we forgive those who tanked against us
And lead us not into the lottery
But deliver us from losing

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Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #62 on: June 30, 2018, 04:31:38 PM »

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He really needs to learn how to utilize his left hand when blocking shots.

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #63 on: June 30, 2018, 05:15:19 PM »

Offline Hoopvortex

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Quote
A man with a shorter limb can be expected to accelerate the knees quicker, all other things being equal;

Be real how many guys with short legs have you seen jump well, it has nothing to do with jumping but helps in bench press.

Dr J, Jordan and a lot of NBA jumpers have long legs and shorter torso.   The key part is to have a longer calf than a thigh that gives you more leverage.  You look at the great leapers in the NBA and most of them have this build.  Williams look to have this build too.  Note small guys can possess longer legs than torso too.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjB677grfvbAhWan4MKHTHHBwsQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.concordmonitor.com%2FDon-t-get-carried-away-with-Williams-just-yet-18374562&psig=AOvVaw0Mhwyr9kZVsnbVN2NThTWP&ust=1530447065793002


Quote
Long-levered athletes tend to express their strength much more successfully on the playing field than in the weight room.  Many times they are stronger outside the lifting room, too. For example, Michael Jordan at one time had a startling vertical jump and was very strong, yet when compared to a person his same weight and a foot shorter he has a large disadvantage in a parallel squat and I doubt if you would ever see him setting any lifting records

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/bodystructure.html

In a way it’s funny - on Wednesday I gave my Kinesiology class their joints exam; and no matter how much I warn them to read carefully and check their work, predictably two or three students will read “radioulnar” where it says “radiocarpal”, etc., etc. You did not respond to what I actually said.

 What I’m saying is actually very simple. The key part is, “all other things being equal.“   It is simple physics:  longer tibias and femurs have more inertia to overcome.

When you say “jump well” you seem to be talking about how high - but notice that I was referring, along with the P3 biomechanics guy, to acceleration at the knee.

Seriously, please post and explain your expertise more. I want to learn more about your view of athleticism. I'd love to see some in depth analyses of the draft's athletic testing.

I began teaching Kinesiology and Anatomy/Physiology to undergraduates in 2003. I’ve done deep tissue bodywork since 1999, and I work mostly with clients who have pain. How unbalanced, asymmetrical movement leads to dysfunction is a daily preoccupation. Somewhere in there I taught dance for a couple of years.

I love players who have fine motor skills and balanced, efficient, effortless movement. Jaylen Brown might be my favorite player, but Tatum and Ojeleye are not far behind.

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #64 on: June 30, 2018, 05:54:41 PM »

Offline Beat LA

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He really needs to learn how to utilize his left hand when blocking shots.

Don't worry, man, that's precisely the reason as to why we now have Jarrod Uthoff, lol ;) ::) ;D.

#HeWillNotEvenMakeTheTeam :'(

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #65 on: June 30, 2018, 09:37:01 PM »

Offline Hoopvortex

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Quote
A man with a shorter limb can be expected to accelerate the knees quicker, all other things being equal;

Be real how many guys with short legs have you seen jump well, it has nothing to do with jumping but helps in bench press.

Dr J, Jordan and a lot of NBA jumpers have long legs and shorter torso.   The key part is to have a longer calf than a thigh that gives you more leverage.  You look at the great leapers in the NBA and most of them have this build.  Williams look to have this build too.  Note small guys can possess longer legs than torso too.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjB677grfvbAhWan4MKHTHHBwsQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.concordmonitor.com%2FDon-t-get-carried-away-with-Williams-just-yet-18374562&psig=AOvVaw0Mhwyr9kZVsnbVN2NThTWP&ust=1530447065793002


Quote
Long-levered athletes tend to express their strength much more successfully on the playing field than in the weight room.  Many times they are stronger outside the lifting room, too. For example, Michael Jordan at one time had a startling vertical jump and was very strong, yet when compared to a person his same weight and a foot shorter he has a large disadvantage in a parallel squat and I doubt if you would ever see him setting any lifting records

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/bodystructure.html

Meant to acknowledge the links you posted here - very cool. Gave you a Tommy Point.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2018, 09:51:33 PM by Hoopvortex »

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #66 on: June 30, 2018, 09:41:22 PM »

Offline vjcsmoke

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It's a very promising pick.  And because of his amazing athleticism and wingspan, RW3 has the chance to be a big man steal much like Rudy Gobert, Clint Capela, Serge Ibaka, Deandre Jordan, etc. etc.

Now will he turn into that, nobody knows for sure.  It all depends on how much desire he has to become better and become one of the best in the game.  The ceiling is very high, but it all depends on Robert if he's going to become one in a long line of Celtic big men greats.  If he can reach the level of Robert Parish I would call this pick an amazing steal.

One word of caution though, big men usually take longer to mature than other positions.  So we might not see his true benefits until year 3.  Or if we are lucky he takes a big step in year 2 and has everybody talking about him the way that Jaylen Brown made that year 2 leap into relevance.

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #67 on: June 30, 2018, 10:04:40 PM »

Offline Hoopvortex

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He really needs to learn how to utilize his left hand when blocking shots.

I think that you might have a point. In other words blocking the man he’s guarding without having to turn.

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #68 on: July 01, 2018, 12:48:09 PM »

Offline rochrist

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They were short centers with vertical and Russell had length and era-Parrish and Mchale did not have the tools of Robert Williams neither were explosive or elite vertical-nether were bouncy
And i'll keep my expectations where I want them.-Quit stalking and attempting to use semantics while fully understanding the gist.Your attempts to discredit are blatantly obvious-Bill Russell had the right idea.

I guess you ve seen him play, right? Full games (plural) not just highlights...

I remember another recent pick with very interesting body measurements... Fab Melo...

Fab Melo could barely walk and chew gum at the same time. He was Fred Munster on the BB court. He had literally one one thousandth of the athleticism this kid has.

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #69 on: July 01, 2018, 12:56:22 PM »

Offline ThaPreacher

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They were short centers with vertical and Russell had length and era-Parrish and Mchale did not have the tools of Robert Williams neither were explosive or elite vertical-nether were bouncy
And i'll keep my expectations where I want them.-Quit stalking and attempting to use semantics while fully understanding the gist.Your attempts to discredit are blatantly obvious-Bill Russell had the right idea.

I guess you ve seen him play, right? Full games (plural) not just highlights...

I remember another recent pick with very interesting body measurements... Fab Melo...

Fab Melo could barely walk and chew gum at the same time. He was Fred Munster on the BB court. He had literally one one thousandth of the athleticism this kid has.

But he could play a 2-3 zone like no other!

https://www.si.com/more-sports/2012/02/20/syracuse
"Just do what you do best."  -Red Auerbach-

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #70 on: July 01, 2018, 05:28:05 PM »

Offline Big333223

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Quote
A man with a shorter limb can be expected to accelerate the knees quicker, all other things being equal;

Be real how many guys with short legs have you seen jump well, it has nothing to do with jumping but helps in bench press.

Dr J, Jordan and a lot of NBA jumpers have long legs and shorter torso.   The key part is to have a longer calf than a thigh that gives you more leverage.  You look at the great leapers in the NBA and most of them have this build.  Williams look to have this build too.  Note small guys can possess longer legs than torso too.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjB677grfvbAhWan4MKHTHHBwsQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.concordmonitor.com%2FDon-t-get-carried-away-with-Williams-just-yet-18374562&psig=AOvVaw0Mhwyr9kZVsnbVN2NThTWP&ust=1530447065793002


Quote
Long-levered athletes tend to express their strength much more successfully on the playing field than in the weight room.  Many times they are stronger outside the lifting room, too. For example, Michael Jordan at one time had a startling vertical jump and was very strong, yet when compared to a person his same weight and a foot shorter he has a large disadvantage in a parallel squat and I doubt if you would ever see him setting any lifting records

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/bodystructure.html

In a way it’s funny - on Wednesday I gave my Kinesiology class their joints exam; and no matter how much I warn them to read carefully and check their work, predictably two or three students will read “radioulnar” where it says “radiocarpal”, etc., etc. You did not respond to what I actually said.

 What I’m saying is actually very simple. The key part is, “all other things being equal.“   It is simple physics:  longer tibias and femurs have more inertia to overcome.

When you say “jump well” you seem to be talking about how high - but notice that I was referring, along with the P3 biomechanics guy, to acceleration at the knee.

Seriously, please post and explain your expertise more. I want to learn more about your view of athleticism. I'd love to see some in depth analyses of the draft's athletic testing.

I began teaching Kinesiology and Anatomy/Physiology to undergraduates in 2003. I’ve done deep tissue bodywork since 1999, and I work mostly with clients who have pain. How unbalanced, asymmetrical movement leads to dysfunction is a daily preoccupation. Somewhere in there I taught dance for a couple of years.

I love players who have fine motor skills and balanced, efficient, effortless movement. Jaylen Brown might be my favorite player, but Tatum and Ojeleye are not far behind.

TP for the info.

I wonder how many basketball players would benefit from dance classes. Balance, coordination, timing...
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Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #71 on: July 01, 2018, 05:30:04 PM »

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He really needs to learn how to utilize his left hand when blocking shots.

I think that you might have a point. In other words blocking the man he’s guarding without having to turn.
TP. All the best shot-blockers in the league know how and when to use their left hand for contesting/blocking shots. All the scouts I rely on (including Mike Schmitz) rave when a big man prospect uses the left arm/hand to block or contest shots.

All the video I've seen on RW3 and never really see him use that left arm. It's a YUUUUUGE advantage and imo RW3 had 2 reasons in college for neglecting the left arm:
1. Elite reach/length and athleticism
2. He loves to smash the ball like a volleyball whenever he can(good thing).

The dude set a school record for most games w/ consecutive blocks (40 something) and averaged 2.5 bpg in like 25 mpg........ALL WITH USING ONE ARM LOL

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #72 on: July 01, 2018, 05:33:16 PM »

Offline Future Celtics Owner

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Quote
A man with a shorter limb can be expected to accelerate the knees quicker, all other things being equal;

Be real how many guys with short legs have you seen jump well, it has nothing to do with jumping but helps in bench press.

Dr J, Jordan and a lot of NBA jumpers have long legs and shorter torso.   The key part is to have a longer calf than a thigh that gives you more leverage.  You look at the great leapers in the NBA and most of them have this build.  Williams look to have this build too.  Note small guys can possess longer legs than torso too.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjB677grfvbAhWan4MKHTHHBwsQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.concordmonitor.com%2FDon-t-get-carried-away-with-Williams-just-yet-18374562&psig=AOvVaw0Mhwyr9kZVsnbVN2NThTWP&ust=1530447065793002


Quote
Long-levered athletes tend to express their strength much more successfully on the playing field than in the weight room.  Many times they are stronger outside the lifting room, too. For example, Michael Jordan at one time had a startling vertical jump and was very strong, yet when compared to a person his same weight and a foot shorter he has a large disadvantage in a parallel squat and I doubt if you would ever see him setting any lifting records

http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/bodystructure.html

In a way it’s funny - on Wednesday I gave my Kinesiology class their joints exam; and no matter how much I warn them to read carefully and check their work, predictably two or three students will read “radioulnar” where it says “radiocarpal”, etc., etc. You did not respond to what I actually said.

 What I’m saying is actually very simple. The key part is, “all other things being equal.“   It is simple physics:  longer tibias and femurs have more inertia to overcome.

When you say “jump well” you seem to be talking about how high - but notice that I was referring, along with the P3 biomechanics guy, to acceleration at the knee.

Seriously, please post and explain your expertise more. I want to learn more about your view of athleticism. I'd love to see some in depth analyses of the draft's athletic testing.

I began teaching Kinesiology and Anatomy/Physiology to undergraduates in 2003. I’ve done deep tissue bodywork since 1999, and I work mostly with clients who have pain. How unbalanced, asymmetrical movement leads to dysfunction is a daily preoccupation. Somewhere in there I taught dance for a couple of years.

I love players who have fine motor skills and balanced, efficient, effortless movement. Jaylen Brown might be my favorite player, but Tatum and Ojeleye are not far behind.

TP for the info.

I wonder how many basketball players would benefit from dance classes. Balance, coordination, timing...
The NBA would have less stiffs.

Can you imagine Yabu and RW3 signing up at the local YMCA/BGC for ballet? "I just want to dance"! - Billy Elliot

Re: Robert Williams and the makings of a masterpiece
« Reply #73 on: July 01, 2018, 05:43:25 PM »

Offline matteo

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another issue already?

Jay Larranaga said the Celtics are all disappointed Robert Williams missed his flight, will handle it internally.

https://twitter.com/byjayking/status/1013537905913094150?s=21

Robert Williams(Merged Threads)
« Reply #74 on: July 01, 2018, 05:43:49 PM »

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No details yet, but presumably that's another stupid move by the rook.   
« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 12:33:45 PM by nickagneta »


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