Author Topic: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police  (Read 3941 times)

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Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #30 on: May 24, 2018, 09:56:20 AM »

Offline green_bballers13

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #31 on: May 24, 2018, 10:14:17 AM »

Offline Big333223

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They're all at fault.

Can't be. Only one person has to be 100% at fault. Nuance is not allowed, only political talking points.
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Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2018, 10:28:30 AM »

Offline Eddie20

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2018, 10:36:43 AM »

Offline green_bballers13

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2018, 10:46:51 AM »

Offline Moranis

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.
What exactly is the police officer supposed to do if the person is not only not answering simple questions, but also ignoring the police office all together?  All Brown had to say was, yeah sorry about the parking job, here is my id, and just wait for the ticket.  Instead he ignores the police office entirely, refuses to provide his name, not only doesn't remove his hands, but says he has stuff in his pockets, etc.  Sterling Brown caused the entire interaction by being a jackass. 

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2018, 10:49:08 AM »

Offline blackbird

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I didnít watch the video and donít need to.


I appreciate your honesty. You won't let facts get in the way of worshipping authority.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2018, 10:49:08 AM »

Offline green_bballers13

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.
What exactly is the police officer supposed to do if the person is not only not answering simple questions, but also ignoring the police office all together?  All Brown had to say was, yeah sorry about the parking job, here is my id, and just wait for the ticket.  Instead he ignores the police office entirely, refuses to provide his name, not only doesn't remove his hands, but says he has stuff in his pockets, etc.  Sterling Brown caused the entire interaction by being a jackass.

Have the car towed. Why does it always need to get physical?

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #37 on: May 24, 2018, 10:54:51 AM »

Offline Grindfather

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

You have literally no idea what you are talking about.  The police cannot just stop and search someone because they want to.  You need reasonable suspicion that the person stop is involved in criminal activity. Your assertion that they have to investigate someone because that person violated a parking ordinance is asinine. Please see Terry stop:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_stop

A parking violation, which is not a criminal citation like a traffic violation, does not qualify. Even in a traffic stop, the level of allowed investigation rises only to the observed crime, namely a traffic violation.  Unless the officer has reasonable suspicion of another crime (they smell alcohol on the driver's breath or see drug paraphernalia on the passenger seat, etc.) they are not allowed to investigate further than asking for license and registration.

We all have certain civil rights, which the police cannot, according to the law, just trample on.  You have a protection against illegal search and seizure.  It's in the dang Constitution. 

All the Badgelickers need to stop asserting the police have unlimited rights to do whatever they want.  You don't have to submit to them in every circumstance like they're the Gestapo. We live in a civil society and there are rules, for everyone.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #38 on: May 24, 2018, 11:01:49 AM »

Offline liam

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.

I agree de-escalation is an excellent solution.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2018, 11:03:20 AM »

Offline BDubs

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2018, 11:19:08 AM »

Offline TomHeinsohn

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

You have more people sympathetic to you on this blog than not. For some reason inexplicable to me, the white upper middle class always shows in defense of the police. I am white upper middle class. To others like me, I cannot stress enough how little your opinion matters when it comes to how the police treat black people in this country. You cannot possibly have lived it. Even Sterling Brown, who is far closer to the 1% than any of us are, and drives a car indicative of his socioeconomic class, is not immune to bigotry and profiling by the police. If you can't see a problem, well that's probably because you

literally cannot see one

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #41 on: May 24, 2018, 11:24:30 AM »

Offline Moranis

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.
What exactly is the police officer supposed to do if the person is not only not answering simple questions, but also ignoring the police office all together?  All Brown had to say was, yeah sorry about the parking job, here is my id, and just wait for the ticket.  Instead he ignores the police office entirely, refuses to provide his name, not only doesn't remove his hands, but says he has stuff in his pockets, etc.  Sterling Brown caused the entire interaction by being a jackass.

Have the car towed. Why does it always need to get physical?
How does the police officer stop Brown from getting in his car and driving away if he doesn't get in his way?

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #42 on: May 24, 2018, 11:26:03 AM »

Offline Androslav

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

You have more people sympathetic to you on this blog than not. For some reason inexplicable to me, the white upper middle class always shows in defense of the police. I am white upper middle class. To others like me, I cannot stress enough how little your opinion matters when it comes to how the police treat black people in this country. You cannot possibly have lived it. Even Sterling Brown, who is far closer to the 1% than any of us are, and drives a car indicative of his socioeconomic class, is not immune to bigotry and profiling by the police. If you can't see a problem, well that's probably because you

literally cannot see one
Police in Croatia is much more vanilla than in the USA I think.  Here I act as they want me to, I cooperate, just to get done with the whole thing faster. I can't support someone who blatantly disrespects the police, extrapolated, the state itself. Place where I live. If the police is bullied, then the state is bullied. Maybe I am too far away to truly understand the example here or the issue in its entirety.
"The joy of the balling under the rims."

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #43 on: May 24, 2018, 11:27:44 AM »

Offline TomHeinsohn

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.
What exactly is the police officer supposed to do if the person is not only not answering simple questions, but also ignoring the police office all together?  All Brown had to say was, yeah sorry about the parking job, here is my id, and just wait for the ticket.  Instead he ignores the police office entirely, refuses to provide his name, not only doesn't remove his hands, but says he has stuff in his pockets, etc.  Sterling Brown caused the entire interaction by being a jackass.

Have the car towed. Why does it always need to get physical?
How does the police officer stop Brown from getting in his car and driving away if he doesn't get in his way?

Let him drive away! You can give him a ticket in the mail. Most tickets are simply left on the windshield, are they not? It's not worth either party getting injured, and as stated above, a parking violation is not probable cause.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #44 on: May 24, 2018, 11:31:34 AM »

Offline Moranis

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