Author Topic: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police  (Read 4064 times)

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Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #45 on: May 24, 2018, 11:35:17 AM »

Online Csfan1984

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Had his hands in his pockets during an arrest and they tased him anyway. This is already becoming a top story. Not good.

The thread to this post should be " How to defy the police "

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The officer's job was write a ticket and ask the guy to move the car if it was his. This cop wanted more, looked for more and made it become more. That's why he is being called out on this as an instigator and the reason for escalating things. Thing is the person it was done to is a professional athlete so it made the news. This stuff happens all over the USA all the time it's old school policing where citizens are victims to aggressive police that feel their job is to "put people in their place".

You don't think Sterling Brown's action contributed to this matter?    I am glad he did not get shot after he did not take his hands out of his pockets.   He was even dumb enough to say and that he had something in his pocket when asked about then the cops swooped in.  It could have been something, a gun, a joint, change who knows.   Maybe he was pretending to be tough for street cred.   But that comment at 14 seconds is what let to the police escalating the situation.   Because when your life is on the life, you're going to assume the worst.

Who tells the police to get back into their car and move along when questioned?   Sterling Brown.


BTW, I watched the Body Cam vids, not the edited version shown on CNN and ESPN trying to stir outrage.
I mentioned what Brown could have done in my other post. The responsibility still falls on the officer to do his job correctly. Which he didn't.
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Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #46 on: May 24, 2018, 11:36:53 AM »

Offline Moranis

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

Am I missing the point though? Do you think that we would have had all of these police shootings over the last couple of years if police didn't expect that they were running into war vs a more calm interaction?

I think de-escalation is a big solution to these problems.
What exactly is the police officer supposed to do if the person is not only not answering simple questions, but also ignoring the police office all together?  All Brown had to say was, yeah sorry about the parking job, here is my id, and just wait for the ticket.  Instead he ignores the police office entirely, refuses to provide his name, not only doesn't remove his hands, but says he has stuff in his pockets, etc.  Sterling Brown caused the entire interaction by being a jackass.

Have the car towed. Why does it always need to get physical?
How does the police officer stop Brown from getting in his car and driving away if he doesn't get in his way?

Let him drive away! You can give him a ticket in the mail. Most tickets are simply left on the windshield, are they not? It's not worth either party getting injured, and as stated above, a parking violation is not probable cause.
Sure, unless the car is going to be towed, in which case it is towed and sent to impound.  Again, though Sterling Brown acted like a jackass.  He acted like the officer was targeting him, when he parked across multiple handicap parking spaces in the middle of the night.  That could indicate any number of things, including that the person might be drunk or otherwise impaired (again the middle of the night and a horrible parking job).  All Brown had to do was be polite and the officer at most would have written him a parking ticket.  Clearly, once the other officers arrived it escalated to an unnecessary level, but Brown is the biggest cause of this problem.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #47 on: May 24, 2018, 11:37:49 AM »

Offline Donoghus

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Brown could've handled the situation better & the MIL police sure as heck could've handled the situation better. 

I think there is some culpability on both sides here.  I don't you can really absolve either party, IMO.


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Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #48 on: May 24, 2018, 11:39:07 AM »

Offline Moranis

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Had his hands in his pockets during an arrest and they tased him anyway. This is already becoming a top story. Not good.

The thread to this post should be " How to defy the police "

Quote
The officer's job was write a ticket and ask the guy to move the car if it was his. This cop wanted more, looked for more and made it become more. That's why he is being called out on this as an instigator and the reason for escalating things. Thing is the person it was done to is a professional athlete so it made the news. This stuff happens all over the USA all the time it's old school policing where citizens are victims to aggressive police that feel their job is to "put people in their place".

You don't think Sterling Brown's action contributed to this matter?    I am glad he did not get shot after he did not take his hands out of his pockets.   He was even dumb enough to say and that he had something in his pocket when asked about then the cops swooped in.  It could have been something, a gun, a joint, change who knows.   Maybe he was pretending to be tough for street cred.   But that comment at 14 seconds is what let to the police escalating the situation.   Because when your life is on the life, you're going to assume the worst.

Who tells the police to get back into their car and move along when questioned?   Sterling Brown.


BTW, I watched the Body Cam vids, not the edited version shown on CNN and ESPN trying to stir outrage.
I mentioned what Brown could have done in my other post. The responsibility still falls on the officer to do his job correctly. Which he didn't.
except he did.  He saw a terrible parking job in the middle of the night and then asked harmless necessary questions to the person who was going to car.  That person refused to answer those questions (initially) and gave the officer a lot of unneeded and unnecessary attitude.  The officer then called for back-up when Brown escalated the problem.  That is exactly what a police officer should do in that situation.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #49 on: May 24, 2018, 11:43:50 AM »

Offline TomHeinsohn

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A young black man with that car probably is approached by police all the time for no good reason. Old white dudes in Volvos probably forget that police exist sometimes. I can count on one hand every single encounter I've ever had with the police. I have no way of predicting how I would react if I were harassed or otherwise approached by the police all the time.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #50 on: May 24, 2018, 11:47:36 AM »

Offline Eddie20

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My brother was a cop for 30 years. These cops and others rarely receive serious training in how to descalate a tense situation. Their handling of this was an example of failed police work.

Why arrest when he is leaving and they have his license number? Mail him a fine later.

Mail him a ticket? What if the subject is wanted and is not providing identification to hide his true identity? What if the said subject is wanted for a capital felony? What if one your loved ones, say wife or child, was the victim of that crime and the officer simply let the individual go? How would you feel then? What you're suggesting is not practical or logical.

What was the impetus to suspect that this man is wanted for a capital felony or other related major crime? Why do you go to the extreme example?

"What if the police officer was in the KKK and had multiple incidents of planting evidence on black people?"

Both sides can use hyperbole. The problem is that it gets us nowhere closer to a solution where police are less trigger happy and young men are more inclined to cooperate with police.

You are missing the point. You can't receive zero cooperation and wash your hands by simply mailing a citation. You have a responsibility to conduct at least some level of investigation, even if it is at the most basic of levels, such as the identification of an individual.

You have literally no idea what you are talking about.  The police cannot just stop and search someone because they want to.  You need reasonable suspicion that the person stop is involved in criminal activity. Your assertion that they have to investigate someone because that person violated a parking ordinance is asinine. Please see Terry stop:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_stop

A parking violation, which is not a criminal citation like a traffic violation, does not qualify. Even in a traffic stop, the level of allowed investigation rises only to the observed crime, namely a traffic violation.  Unless the officer has reasonable suspicion of another crime (they smell alcohol on the driver's breath or see drug paraphernalia on the passenger seat, etc.) they are not allowed to investigate further than asking for license and registration.

We all have certain civil rights, which the police cannot, according to the law, just trample on.  You have a protection against illegal search and seizure.  It's in the dang Constitution. 

All the Badgelickers need to stop asserting the police have unlimited rights to do whatever they want.  You don't have to submit to them in every circumstance like they're the Gestapo. We live in a civil society and there are rules, for everyone.

I'm pretty sure I know a little more on this topic than you do.

Brown committed a parking violation and was approached by the officer. At this point, the officer detained Brown and asked him for identification and Brown was dismissive and seemingly refused. This isn't a casual encounter where Brown is free to leave. You seem to think that since the infraction was minor it prevents the officer from asking Brown for identification, but it doesn't. Oh, and when Brown refuses to show his hands, keeps his in his pockets, and says he has something in his pocket, the cops have reasonable suspicion to believe Brown is concealing a weapon or something else and they have every right to conduct a pat down.

As for PC on a vehicle stop an odor of say marijuana, doesn't have to be visible, allows you to search the interior of the vehicle. Hell, you can call out a drug dog and if it hits then you can search too.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 11:55:52 AM by Eddie20 »

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #51 on: May 24, 2018, 11:57:46 AM »

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What exactly is the police officer supposed to do if the person is not only not answering simple questions, but also ignoring the police office all together?  All Brown had to say was, yeah sorry about the parking job, here is my id, and just wait for the ticket.  Instead he ignores the police office entirely, refuses to provide his name, not only doesn't remove his hands, but says he has stuff in his pockets, etc.  Sterling Brown caused the entire interaction by being a jackass.
Pretty much this.

The whole "you know who I am" situation here reminds me of that knucklehead Okafor when he got into it with Boston fans.

Frankly, I'd never heard of Sterling Brown before today, and I don't think that being a fringe player on a middling team grants you a free "be a jerk to law enforcement" card. Jesus.
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Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #52 on: May 24, 2018, 12:50:24 PM »

Offline green_bballers13

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

I agree with most everything you wrote here, except I don't think there's a consensus that the police officer's actions were OK. I think most people agree that he went too far, and the minority dissenting opinion is often louder in these emotionally charged situations.

I myself don't have strong connections to the police (family, friends). If, however, I did and I heard anti-police rhetoric, I would likely become entrenched in my support of the police. People respond defensively to criticism- it's almost a fact at this point.

I think most people can see that armed police officers shouldn't be aggressively engaging with civilians when it comes to trivial matters. If Brown's out there spraying fire with a machine gun, I'm fine with the aggressive approach. To me, the police officer lost control of the situation, and didn't back down. It's not like he can't take photos of the guy and the plates. If the officer still feels disrespected and wants to act on his emotions, he can always show up to court and make sure that they bust Brown's cookies with some legal mumbo jumbo.

And yes, I think Brown could have handled himself a whole lot better.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #53 on: May 24, 2018, 02:48:43 PM »

Offline Rosco917

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When the police say to take your hands out of your pockets, you need to take your hands out of your pocket.

There are specific reasons why they ask that of you. I'm sure everyone can figure out what the reasons are.

Non-compliance leads to tension and suspicion.

At the end of the day...they want to go home and see their children and wives unharmed.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #54 on: May 24, 2018, 02:54:30 PM »

Offline JSD

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Many times, a citizen under investigation, will escalate a trivial matter because of a warrant and an extensive criminal history. Most of the time, actually.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #55 on: May 24, 2018, 03:01:21 PM »

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

You're right! just give him a ticket and move on. A parking violation doesn't have anything to do with your license , he can just ticket the car. Everything else is harassment. These kind of cops put all cops in danger with there disrespect and there macho head games.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #56 on: May 24, 2018, 03:02:47 PM »

Offline liam

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

I agree with most everything you wrote here, except I don't think there's a consensus that the police officer's actions were OK. I think most people agree that he went too far, and the minority dissenting opinion is often louder in these emotionally charged situations.

I myself don't have strong connections to the police (family, friends). If, however, I did and I heard anti-police rhetoric, I would likely become entrenched in my support of the police. People respond defensively to criticism- it's almost a fact at this point.

I think most people can see that armed police officers shouldn't be aggressively engaging with civilians when it comes to trivial matters. If Brown's out there spraying fire with a machine gun, I'm fine with the aggressive approach. To me, the police officer lost control of the situation, and didn't back down. It's not like he can't take photos of the guy and the plates. If the officer still feels disrespected and wants to act on his emotions, he can always show up to court and make sure that they bust Brown's cookies with some legal mumbo jumbo.

And yes, I think Brown could have handled himself a whole lot better.

The Police have to have probable cause. If you are so scared don't be a cop.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #57 on: May 24, 2018, 03:08:47 PM »

Offline playdream

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When the police say to take your hands out of your pockets, you need to take your hands out of your pocket.

There are specific reasons why they ask that of you. I'm sure everyone can figure out what the reasons are.

Non-compliance leads to tension and suspicion.

At the end of the day...they want to go home and see their children and wives unharmed.
This...it's not "just a parking violation", it's a grown man intentionally break the law and showed uncooperative attitude all along against instigation, the Cops can handle this better in a wonderland and thats why they apologize, but in real world if i'm that Cop i absolutely do the same, he can kill me in a second with his gun in the pocket or with his bare hands, he can be a drug dealer or a serial killer that's going to harm hundreds, i'm not going to let that happen.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #58 on: May 24, 2018, 03:10:07 PM »

Offline KGs Knee

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

You're right! just give him a ticket and move on. A parking violation doesn't have anything to do with your license , he can just ticket the car. Everything else is harassment. These kind of cops put all cops in danger with there disrespect and there macho head games.

I can assure you that you are absolutely wrong here. An officer absolutely has the right to ask you for your driver's license in this situation. The officer has every reason to reasonably suspect Brown was driving the car prior to parking it illegally, and was intending g on again driving the care when he left the store. Brown wasn't just going to walk away, he was going to get in his car and drive away.

Re: NBA player Sterling Brown tased by Milwaukee police
« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2018, 03:10:20 PM »

Offline JSD

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Reading these comments reminds me why I rarely participate in this blog, every post about obvious over reach by police officers always has so many people blindly supporting the cops. I'm black & just think its awful that there seems to be some consensus that the cops creating a hostile incident over a freaking parking ticket is OK. They literally surrounded this man with like 10 cops & intimidated him gang style. This was gang level types of intimidation simple & plain. As a military veteran, I dont think I could ever trust the "authorities" in this country, they've proven to be dishonest far too many times, but even more troubling is the people cheering on the cops as they terrorize black citizens over petty minor infractions while we watch white mass murderers get taken in without a scratch on them, shoot, white mass murderers can even get the cops to buy them Burger King for free if they say their hungry

I agree with most everything you wrote here, except I don't think there's a consensus that the police officer's actions were OK. I think most people agree that he went too far, and the minority dissenting opinion is often louder in these emotionally charged situations.

I myself don't have strong connections to the police (family, friends). If, however, I did and I heard anti-police rhetoric, I would likely become entrenched in my support of the police. People respond defensively to criticism- it's almost a fact at this point.

I think most people can see that armed police officers shouldn't be aggressively engaging with civilians when it comes to trivial matters. If Brown's out there spraying fire with a machine gun, I'm fine with the aggressive approach. To me, the police officer lost control of the situation, and didn't back down. It's not like he can't take photos of the guy and the plates. If the officer still feels disrespected and wants to act on his emotions, he can always show up to court and make sure that they bust Brown's cookies with some legal mumbo jumbo.

And yes, I think Brown could have handled himself a whole lot better.

The Police have to have probable cause. If you are so scared don't be a cop.

Constitutionally, police need to reach the threshold of "Reasonable Suspicion", to conduct an investigation, Probable Cause is needed for search or arrest. Because of Brown's actions, officers in this case reached the threshold for what would have been a legal pat frisk. See Terry V Ohio.