Author Topic: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!  (Read 3400 times)

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Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #45 on: May 16, 2018, 04:11:08 PM »

Offline LatterDayCelticsfan

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Obviously a lot of people missed on this one, sports talks shows, bettors, general fans, you name it.  How did it happen?

I think Milwaukee is better than people think (better than I realized, that is for sure).  We beat them but did not get much credit for it, it was just Milwaukee.

Boston proved to be much better than Philly but somehow that went under the radar.  It was more about how Philly lost than how Boston won.  Or to put it another way, the thinking was Philly wasn't as good as everyone thought instead of Boston is better than people thought.

The Cavs swept the Raptors.  Swept what was perceived as a very good team.  CLE appeared to be hitting on all cylinders.  They were hot.

Add this up and of course most people thought CLE would roll over the Celtics.  I am actually more surprised by how bad the Cavs have been more than how good the Celtics have been,but I am surprised by both.  How could that team have swept Toronto?  I still don't get it.

In terms of the Celtics, I am the most surprised and impressed by Jaylen Brown.  To be this young and to play this well in the playoffs is remarkable.  More impressive than Tatum and plenty has been said about Tatum.  Rozier has also had his moments but he has not been as consistently good as Brown or even Tatum.  Horford, Smart, Morris have all been good also but I kind of expect it from them.  I am not surprised by their play but certainly happy to see them play well.

This reminds me of the 2010-11 season when after practically every loss, the TV pundits would repeat some slogan about how nobody is beating LA four times out of seven. Then that LA team got swept out of the playoffs by the Mavs.

Pundits (especially ESPN'S) tend to have massive recency bias towards who has been good the past few years.
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Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #46 on: May 16, 2018, 04:23:28 PM »

Offline Moranis

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yesterday the Speak for Yourself guys all basically said that yesterday was not a must win game except for Boston.  In fact, they generally gave the Celtics a very good chance of winning the game.  So I expect more of the same from today's show.

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #47 on: May 16, 2018, 05:06:43 PM »

Offline TheReaLPuba

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Boston wins game three it will be over. If they lose game three we will have to hear for 24 hours how the Cavs are back, the Cs can't win on the road and how every expects the Cavs to win the series.

Get game 3 and Game 4 is house money. I expect Game 3 will be the Cavs last major stand. they will throw everything at Boston. If Boston wins I expect to see a disinterested Cavs and LBJ in game 4.

Get game 3 and you control everything.

I actually have the opposite feeling.

If we go up 3-0 I think we lax a bit and on the flip side the Cavs role players play more free as the pressure to win (playing with LeBron is mentally exhausting) is gone.

They can just play like they’re the underdogs.

Plus I don’t want the Cs to play with the pressure of being the first team to blow a 3-0 series lead.

I would not mind the Cavs winning Game 3 (of course I won’t flat out reject a Cs win) to keep the Cs more locked in as the underdogs as they play better and more together in this role.


Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #48 on: May 16, 2018, 05:51:48 PM »

Offline Celtics4ever

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I bet Nick Wright is hiding in the corner eating chocolate ice cream after some of these games, dude loves LeBron so much....

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #49 on: May 16, 2018, 06:14:00 PM »

Offline Rosco917

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ysnJN-1m7c


Tyronn Lue says Celtic "Gooning" the game up.


Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #50 on: May 16, 2018, 06:49:58 PM »

Offline Phantom255x

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ysnJN-1m7c


Tyronn Lue says Celtic "Gooning" the game up.

After what JR did last night??

2018 Mock Trade Deadline (New York Knicks)

Roster: Porzingis, Kanter, Hardaway Jr, Julius Randle, Schroder, Beasley, Alex Abrines, Jarrett Jack, Frank Ntilikina, Lance Thomas, Kyle Singler, Josh Huestis, Ron Baker, Trey Burke, Luke Kornet, Isaiah Hicks

Future Draft Picks: https://www.prosportstransactions.com/basketball/DraftTrades/Future/Knick

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #51 on: May 16, 2018, 11:18:16 PM »

Offline Beat LA

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Don't forget Lebron's personal media puppet, Brian Windhorst.

Speaking of whom, check out his latest "article", with my favorite parts being highlighted. Dude is salty AF.

Quote
LeBron & Co. are faced with a spry Celtics contender ... and organizational fatigue

BOSTON -- Tuesday was a fascinating day for the Boston Celtics franchise, an ode to the value of smart management, calculated risk-taking and stability.

At the NBA draft lottery in Chicago, team president Rich Gotham shared an awkward dual-desk arrangement on the dais with Elton Brand, general manager of the Philadelphia 76ers' G League team. Just a week after putting them out of the playoffs, the Celtics were at the lottery to ceremonially take a 76ers-owned pick if it landed in spot No. 2 or No. 3.

It was the latest reminder of a trade the two teams made last June, a trade Boston is winning right now by a couple of touchdowns -- especially now that the Celtics will be taking the Sacramento Kings' pick from the 76ers next year (and the Kings are drafting in the top 10 for the 10th consecutive year). And that on top of Celtics rookie Jayson Tatum having just completely outplayed 76ers rookie Ben Simmons while fellow rookie Markelle Fultz watched from the bench.

Then in the nightcap at TD Garden, Boston and its youthful, team-centric and expectation-free roster punished an older, slower and definitely less-happy Cleveland Cavaliers team 107-94 to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference finals.

It was set against the backdrop of the Cavs staying at the No. 8 spot in the same lottery, the remaining business from the Kyrie Irving trade settled. The Celtics controlled the Brooklyn Nets' pick for three straight seasons. It landed them Jaylen Brown, Tatum and, via trade, Irving. Those three players might end up being the foundation of a championship team, plus whomever they use that Kings pick on a year from now.

The last player selected with the No. 8 pick to be an All-Star was Vin Baker, taken in the 1993 draft. The die isn't cast, but the Cavs look to have an uphill battle to emerge from the Irving trade feeling positive.

When the Celtics players were frolicking to the basket in a second-half surge Tuesday, it wasn't just the circumstances, the relentless crowd or Boston PA man Eddie Palladino's flowing voice that were getting under their skin. It was the Cavs players themselves.

The Cavs aren't just battling the ascendant Celtics, they are battling an enemy that has dogged LeBron James teams in the past: It's organizational fatigue, and it's very real.

Like the Miami Heat before them and to a certain extent the last generation's Cavs, it seems to be a side effect of having James: where the quest for championships combined with a lack of security over keeping James leads to some win-now, pay-later decisions.

Acquire older veterans instead of developing younger players. Sign players to large contracts because they fit with James or because they can't be replaced if they leave in free agency. Trade draft picks to get veterans or as a way to relieve payroll pressure. Deal with the stress of repeated long playoff runs, endure massive media scrutiny, manage varying degrees of drama.

The players get sick of one another. They get sick of the coach. The coach gets sick of the players. As a group, they lose sight of the process of the season because it becomes monotonous. There are highs -- with James teams there are always highs -- but the baggage everyone is carrying makes the flight that much harder to maintain.

Pat Riley, who has seen about everything that can be seen in professional basketball, described this cyclical struggle of great teams as "the disease of me." And even Riley, who wrote the book on it, couldn't stop some of it from hitting his Heat franchise before James left town. The 2013-14 Heat team that James took to the Finals was exhausted mentally, physically and spiritually by the end.

Then there are the issues unique to the Cavs, where the previous successful general manager, David Griffin, and the owner, Dan Gilbert, couldn't work together. The owner and James don't trust each other. The new general manager, Koby Altman, was put in a next-to-impossible situation.

All of it has worn them out, all of them. Even the new players -- George Hill, Rodney Hood, Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr. -- have been roasted for their inconsistent or nonexistent play. But they have to feel as if they jumped on the back of a thoroughbred in the closing stretch, everything is moving so fast and is so disorienting from what they were used to.

These challenges have risen for the Cavs' Western counterpart, the Golden State Warriors, this season, too. Coach Steve Kerr has said repeatedly this has been his most challenging season. He has tried every trick he knows to keep the group together, right down to letting the players run huddles. But the difference in the influx of a talent like Kevin Durant vs. the departure of a talent like Irving is the difference that means everything.

Someday, this Celtics group might be there. When aging players want one last deal or all the young players want to be paid or when some get tired of coach Brad Stevens getting all the credit all the time. But that day isn't today. This team is on the way up and enjoying the honeymoon, and it shows in every facet of the game. The Celtics play without burden and it's overwhelming the Cavs so far.

There's no doubt with James as the driving force, the Cavs play as if they have a certain mental edge over opponents. They've inflicted so much damage over the years to teams like the Toronto Raptors, Indiana Pacers, Chicago Bulls, et al.

But like the alpha male lion who had to fight his way to the head of the pride, the battles build up scar tissue and the younger upstarts circle, plotting for a chance to shove him out. At some point, it catches up with you. That upstart, it is starting to appear, is the Celtics.

Calling a playoff series over too early is a classic mistake. Simply assuming the Celtics, who haven't played well on the road in the postseason and still have some weaknesses that can catch them, will win two of the next five games is dangerous. The Cavs are hard to beat four in seven; they've won 12 series in the past four years after all. James has rescued his teams from worse spots.

But no matter how this conference finals plays out, it doesn't change the organizational fatigue the Cavs are fighting. It's hanging on them like a weight. Combined with their diminished talent from a season ago, it's making this playoff run feel like a trudge.

Talk about a wealth of material, lol, but especially insofar as Windhorst incorrectly referring to Pat Riley's term for complacency, etc., as "The disease of me" ::) is concerned.

Like, bruh, you spent four seasons in Miami around Lebron and Riley and yet somehow failed to pick up on the concept known as "The disease of MORE"? ::) Seriously, does no one edit anything, anymore? ::)

http://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/23517495/lebron-james-cleveland-cavaliers-facing-boston-celtics-organizational-fatigue-nba

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #52 on: May 17, 2018, 02:55:18 AM »

Offline Beat LA

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Chris Broussard is worthless. Waste of DNA.

Multiple sources confirm

Multiple sauces too.

Which ones? Honey Mustard? Sweet and Sour?  :laugh:

MULTIPLE SAUCES CANS CONFIRM!!!!!!!!!!

Sorry to pile on, here, but I just love this graphic - 



;D

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #53 on: May 17, 2018, 03:24:34 AM »

Offline j804

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Don't forget Lebron's personal media puppet, Brian Windhorst.

Speaking of whom, check out his latest "article", with my favorite parts being highlighted. Dude is salty AF.

Quote
LeBron & Co. are faced with a spry Celtics contender ... and organizational fatigue

BOSTON -- Tuesday was a fascinating day for the Boston Celtics franchise, an ode to the value of smart management, calculated risk-taking and stability.

At the NBA draft lottery in Chicago, team president Rich Gotham shared an awkward dual-desk arrangement on the dais with Elton Brand, general manager of the Philadelphia 76ers' G League team. Just a week after putting them out of the playoffs, the Celtics were at the lottery to ceremonially take a 76ers-owned pick if it landed in spot No. 2 or No. 3.

It was the latest reminder of a trade the two teams made last June, a trade Boston is winning right now by a couple of touchdowns -- especially now that the Celtics will be taking the Sacramento Kings' pick from the 76ers next year (and the Kings are drafting in the top 10 for the 10th consecutive year). And that on top of Celtics rookie Jayson Tatum having just completely outplayed 76ers rookie Ben Simmons while fellow rookie Markelle Fultz watched from the bench.

Then in the nightcap at TD Garden, Boston and its youthful, team-centric and expectation-free roster punished an older, slower and definitely less-happy Cleveland Cavaliers team 107-94 to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference finals.

It was set against the backdrop of the Cavs staying at the No. 8 spot in the same lottery, the remaining business from the Kyrie Irving trade settled. The Celtics controlled the Brooklyn Nets' pick for three straight seasons. It landed them Jaylen Brown, Tatum and, via trade, Irving. Those three players might end up being the foundation of a championship team, plus whomever they use that Kings pick on a year from now.

The last player selected with the No. 8 pick to be an All-Star was Vin Baker, taken in the 1993 draft. The die isn't cast, but the Cavs look to have an uphill battle to emerge from the Irving trade feeling positive.

When the Celtics players were frolicking to the basket in a second-half surge Tuesday, it wasn't just the circumstances, the relentless crowd or Boston PA man Eddie Palladino's flowing voice that were getting under their skin. It was the Cavs players themselves.

The Cavs aren't just battling the ascendant Celtics, they are battling an enemy that has dogged LeBron James teams in the past: It's organizational fatigue, and it's very real.

Like the Miami Heat before them and to a certain extent the last generation's Cavs, it seems to be a side effect of having James: where the quest for championships combined with a lack of security over keeping James leads to some win-now, pay-later decisions.

Acquire older veterans instead of developing younger players. Sign players to large contracts because they fit with James or because they can't be replaced if they leave in free agency. Trade draft picks to get veterans or as a way to relieve payroll pressure. Deal with the stress of repeated long playoff runs, endure massive media scrutiny, manage varying degrees of drama.

The players get sick of one another. They get sick of the coach. The coach gets sick of the players. As a group, they lose sight of the process of the season because it becomes monotonous. There are highs -- with James teams there are always highs -- but the baggage everyone is carrying makes the flight that much harder to maintain.

Pat Riley, who has seen about everything that can be seen in professional basketball, described this cyclical struggle of great teams as "the disease of me." And even Riley, who wrote the book on it, couldn't stop some of it from hitting his Heat franchise before James left town. The 2013-14 Heat team that James took to the Finals was exhausted mentally, physically and spiritually by the end.

Then there are the issues unique to the Cavs, where the previous successful general manager, David Griffin, and the owner, Dan Gilbert, couldn't work together. The owner and James don't trust each other. The new general manager, Koby Altman, was put in a next-to-impossible situation.

All of it has worn them out, all of them. Even the new players -- George Hill, Rodney Hood, Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr. -- have been roasted for their inconsistent or nonexistent play. But they have to feel as if they jumped on the back of a thoroughbred in the closing stretch, everything is moving so fast and is so disorienting from what they were used to.

These challenges have risen for the Cavs' Western counterpart, the Golden State Warriors, this season, too. Coach Steve Kerr has said repeatedly this has been his most challenging season. He has tried every trick he knows to keep the group together, right down to letting the players run huddles. But the difference in the influx of a talent like Kevin Durant vs. the departure of a talent like Irving is the difference that means everything.

Someday, this Celtics group might be there. When aging players want one last deal or all the young players want to be paid or when some get tired of coach Brad Stevens getting all the credit all the time. But that day isn't today. This team is on the way up and enjoying the honeymoon, and it shows in every facet of the game. The Celtics play without burden and it's overwhelming the Cavs so far.

There's no doubt with James as the driving force, the Cavs play as if they have a certain mental edge over opponents. They've inflicted so much damage over the years to teams like the Toronto Raptors, Indiana Pacers, Chicago Bulls, et al.

But like the alpha male lion who had to fight his way to the head of the pride, the battles build up scar tissue and the younger upstarts circle, plotting for a chance to shove him out. At some point, it catches up with you. That upstart, it is starting to appear, is the Celtics.

Calling a playoff series over too early is a classic mistake. Simply assuming the Celtics, who haven't played well on the road in the postseason and still have some weaknesses that can catch them, will win two of the next five games is dangerous. The Cavs are hard to beat four in seven; they've won 12 series in the past four years after all. James has rescued his teams from worse spots.

But no matter how this conference finals plays out, it doesn't change the organizational fatigue the Cavs are fighting. It's hanging on them like a weight. Combined with their diminished talent from a season ago, it's making this playoff run feel like a trudge.

Talk about a wealth of material, lol, but especially insofar as Windhorst incorrectly referring to Pat Riley's term for complacency, etc., as "The disease of me" ::) is concerned.

Like, bruh, you spent four seasons in Miami around Lebron and Riley and yet somehow failed to pick up on the concept known as "The disease of MORE"? ::) Seriously, does no one edit anything, anymore? ::)

http://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/23517495/lebron-james-cleveland-cavaliers-facing-boston-celtics-organizational-fatigue-nba
Did y’all see Windy postgame? He legit looked infuriated. ****
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Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #54 on: May 17, 2018, 03:37:03 AM »

Offline GreenEnvy

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Boston wins game three it will be over. If they lose game three we will have to hear for 24 hours how the Cavs are back, the Cs can't win on the road and how every expects the Cavs to win the series.

Get game 3 and Game 4 is house money. I expect Game 3 will be the Cavs last major stand. they will throw everything at Boston. If Boston wins I expect to see a disinterested Cavs and LBJ in game 4.

Get game 3 and you control everything.

I actually have the opposite feeling.

If we go up 3-0 I think we lax a bit and on the flip side the Cavs role players play more free as the pressure to win (playing with LeBron is mentally exhausting) is gone.

They can just play like they’re the underdogs.

Plus I don’t want the Cs to play with the pressure of being the first team to blow a 3-0 series lead.

I would not mind the Cavs winning Game 3 (of course I won’t flat out reject a Cs win) to keep the Cs more locked in as the underdogs as they play better and more together in this role.

Celtics need to win Game 3. It will rip their hearts out. They will be dead.

We learned from Game 3 in Milwaukee. We learned from Game 4 in Philly.

No need to give them any glimmer of hope. Take it to them early and erase any confidence they may have. Quiet their crowd and they will fold.

We know Toronto was absolutely brutal in Game 4, but they nearly won Game 3 in Cleveland and Indy dusted them the first game and then played three very close games there. We are a better road team than both of those teams. The point is that they aren’t all that dominant at home.

Game 3 is very winnable. Need to execute from the start.
I AM A CELTIC

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #55 on: May 17, 2018, 05:36:54 AM »

Offline Eddie20

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Don't forget Lebron's personal media puppet, Brian Windhorst.

Speaking of whom, check out his latest "article", with my favorite parts being highlighted. Dude is salty AF.

Quote
LeBron & Co. are faced with a spry Celtics contender ... and organizational fatigue

BOSTON -- Tuesday was a fascinating day for the Boston Celtics franchise, an ode to the value of smart management, calculated risk-taking and stability.

At the NBA draft lottery in Chicago, team president Rich Gotham shared an awkward dual-desk arrangement on the dais with Elton Brand, general manager of the Philadelphia 76ers' G League team. Just a week after putting them out of the playoffs, the Celtics were at the lottery to ceremonially take a 76ers-owned pick if it landed in spot No. 2 or No. 3.

It was the latest reminder of a trade the two teams made last June, a trade Boston is winning right now by a couple of touchdowns -- especially now that the Celtics will be taking the Sacramento Kings' pick from the 76ers next year (and the Kings are drafting in the top 10 for the 10th consecutive year). And that on top of Celtics rookie Jayson Tatum having just completely outplayed 76ers rookie Ben Simmons while fellow rookie Markelle Fultz watched from the bench.

Then in the nightcap at TD Garden, Boston and its youthful, team-centric and expectation-free roster punished an older, slower and definitely less-happy Cleveland Cavaliers team 107-94 to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference finals.

It was set against the backdrop of the Cavs staying at the No. 8 spot in the same lottery, the remaining business from the Kyrie Irving trade settled. The Celtics controlled the Brooklyn Nets' pick for three straight seasons. It landed them Jaylen Brown, Tatum and, via trade, Irving. Those three players might end up being the foundation of a championship team, plus whomever they use that Kings pick on a year from now.

The last player selected with the No. 8 pick to be an All-Star was Vin Baker, taken in the 1993 draft. The die isn't cast, but the Cavs look to have an uphill battle to emerge from the Irving trade feeling positive.

When the Celtics players were frolicking to the basket in a second-half surge Tuesday, it wasn't just the circumstances, the relentless crowd or Boston PA man Eddie Palladino's flowing voice that were getting under their skin. It was the Cavs players themselves.

The Cavs aren't just battling the ascendant Celtics, they are battling an enemy that has dogged LeBron James teams in the past: It's organizational fatigue, and it's very real.

Like the Miami Heat before them and to a certain extent the last generation's Cavs, it seems to be a side effect of having James: where the quest for championships combined with a lack of security over keeping James leads to some win-now, pay-later decisions.

Acquire older veterans instead of developing younger players. Sign players to large contracts because they fit with James or because they can't be replaced if they leave in free agency. Trade draft picks to get veterans or as a way to relieve payroll pressure. Deal with the stress of repeated long playoff runs, endure massive media scrutiny, manage varying degrees of drama.

The players get sick of one another. They get sick of the coach. The coach gets sick of the players. As a group, they lose sight of the process of the season because it becomes monotonous. There are highs -- with James teams there are always highs -- but the baggage everyone is carrying makes the flight that much harder to maintain.

Pat Riley, who has seen about everything that can be seen in professional basketball, described this cyclical struggle of great teams as "the disease of me." And even Riley, who wrote the book on it, couldn't stop some of it from hitting his Heat franchise before James left town. The 2013-14 Heat team that James took to the Finals was exhausted mentally, physically and spiritually by the end.

Then there are the issues unique to the Cavs, where the previous successful general manager, David Griffin, and the owner, Dan Gilbert, couldn't work together. The owner and James don't trust each other. The new general manager, Koby Altman, was put in a next-to-impossible situation.

All of it has worn them out, all of them. Even the new players -- George Hill, Rodney Hood, Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr. -- have been roasted for their inconsistent or nonexistent play. But they have to feel as if they jumped on the back of a thoroughbred in the closing stretch, everything is moving so fast and is so disorienting from what they were used to.

These challenges have risen for the Cavs' Western counterpart, the Golden State Warriors, this season, too. Coach Steve Kerr has said repeatedly this has been his most challenging season. He has tried every trick he knows to keep the group together, right down to letting the players run huddles. But the difference in the influx of a talent like Kevin Durant vs. the departure of a talent like Irving is the difference that means everything.

Someday, this Celtics group might be there. When aging players want one last deal or all the young players want to be paid or when some get tired of coach Brad Stevens getting all the credit all the time. But that day isn't today. This team is on the way up and enjoying the honeymoon, and it shows in every facet of the game. The Celtics play without burden and it's overwhelming the Cavs so far.

There's no doubt with James as the driving force, the Cavs play as if they have a certain mental edge over opponents. They've inflicted so much damage over the years to teams like the Toronto Raptors, Indiana Pacers, Chicago Bulls, et al.

But like the alpha male lion who had to fight his way to the head of the pride, the battles build up scar tissue and the younger upstarts circle, plotting for a chance to shove him out. At some point, it catches up with you. That upstart, it is starting to appear, is the Celtics.

Calling a playoff series over too early is a classic mistake. Simply assuming the Celtics, who haven't played well on the road in the postseason and still have some weaknesses that can catch them, will win two of the next five games is dangerous. The Cavs are hard to beat four in seven; they've won 12 series in the past four years after all. James has rescued his teams from worse spots.

But no matter how this conference finals plays out, it doesn't change the organizational fatigue the Cavs are fighting. It's hanging on them like a weight. Combined with their diminished talent from a season ago, it's making this playoff run feel like a trudge.

Talk about a wealth of material, lol, but especially insofar as Windhorst incorrectly referring to Pat Riley's term for complacency, etc., as "The disease of me" ::) is concerned.

Like, bruh, you spent four seasons in Miami around Lebron and Riley and yet somehow failed to pick up on the concept known as "The disease of MORE"? ::) Seriously, does no one edit anything, anymore? ::)

http://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/23517495/lebron-james-cleveland-cavaliers-facing-boston-celtics-organizational-fatigue-nba

Except you're wrong...

http://pickandpop.net/2015/12/the-disease-of-me/

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #56 on: May 17, 2018, 06:29:01 AM »

Offline Celtics4ever

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LeBron should be next the dictionary of that disease of me.   Unselfish on the court, but you can tell the guy thinks the world rotates around him.

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #57 on: May 17, 2018, 08:28:56 AM »

Offline Big333223

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This reminds me of the 2010-11 season when after practically every loss, the TV pundits would repeat some slogan about how nobody is beating LA four times out of seven. Then that LA team got swept out of the playoffs by the Mavs.

Pundits (especially ESPN'S) tend to have massive recency bias towards who has been good the past few years.

I forgot the Lakers were swept that series. TP for reminding me of the Lakers being crappy.

I'm looking at that series right now and it's pretty interesting. Dirk was 8/11 from 3 and 15/16 from the line through 4 games. That's nuts. After falling 0-3, the Lakers absolutely laid down in Game 4. No pride.
1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1974, 1976, 1981, 1984, 1986, 2008, 2019

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #58 on: May 17, 2018, 08:57:44 AM »

Offline celticinorlando

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I did not realize how little defense he plays. He is basically playing a one man zone standing in the middle of the paint. He does not chase he man and he does not close out on shooter.

Cavs tried to him on the least productive player but that makes it hard since all 5 guys on the court can shoot and drive to the rim. That is reason #1 the Cavs defense is so bad. You best player is using the time to catch a break.
“The rim is looking bigger and bigger every game.”

 Paul Pierce

Re: Can't Wait To Hear What The Fox Sports Show Hosts/"Experts" Say!
« Reply #59 on: May 17, 2018, 09:35:16 AM »

Offline fairweatherfan

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No judgment or anything, it's sports and it's supposed to be dumb entertainment, but as someone who doesn't watch any of these shows I can't help but notice how many posters

- absolutely hate these pundits, and
- watch them all the time/are highly familiar with their statements

What's the deal? Why keep going back if you know it's click/viewbait crap?