Author Topic: W. Carter's mom: free Duke education is the equivalent of African slavery  (Read 2193 times)

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Offline PhoSita

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We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.
No one is forcing anyone to do anything. This is nonsense.

If you want to play basketball in the NCAA, which generates billions in revenue every year, you have to play for free.
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Offline PhoSita

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The organization doesn't exist to make money for itself. Its a non profit organization

Just like private colleges are non-profit. 

Please imagine me saying "non-profit" with as much sarcasm as possible.

I'm sure the administrators, coaches, and trustees of these non-profit institutions spend a great deal of time in reflection on their lives of service to non-profit education every time they look at the multi-million dollar balance in their bank accounts.
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Offline GreenEnvy

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This is even dumber than what Kanye said.

These athletes have a choice in what they do after high school. First of all, not all Duke players go on to play in the NBA, so many rely on that free education when they are done playing. For those that can make the League, they donít have to go to Duke or any other NCAA program. They can go to the G-League, overseas, or sit at home and wait a year.

They are compensated (maybe not to the extent the NCAA profits off them, but thatís a whole other story that is way over Carterís momís head) for their basketball talent. Look up what a college education costs, especially from an elite university like Duke. Iíd guesstimate total cost is probably over $200,000, so in essence 18-22 year olds are receiving $50K+/year compensation.

Thatís hardly slavery.
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We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.
No one is forcing anyone to do anything. This is nonsense.

If you want to play basketball in the NCAA, which generates billions in revenue every year, you have to play for free.

You also have the choice to not play for an NCAA school.   You are making the conscious choice to play for free. There are alternatives out there.

If you're NBA talent, you'll be recognized as NBA talent once way or another.  It's up to you if you want to showcase that in the NCAA for free or to try & get by for a year getting paid in the G League or overseas.

But the choice is there.


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Online Erik

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I was completely expecting to read this thread and rage quit my browser as usual, but what can I say... You guys really nailed it. This isnít the first time Iíve heard this comparison and itís usually followed by support. Itís a FREE education... to Duke. I know that he wonít complete it, but some people do... and that **** isnít cheap. We have an entire generation in actual slavery working 15 years to pay off their student loans (not even starting on a home yet) and this woman has the nerve to complain about the system? Get the hell out of here with that.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 06:10:49 PM by Erik »

Offline Big333223

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We can agree it's not as bad as slavery.

We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.

And I think we can agree that, with the backdrop of slavery as a major part of our nation's history, the argument that "But we're providing them room and board and an education" is not super duper persuasive in response to the accusation that there's a collusive effort by the powerful to extract the valuable efforts of the not-powerful without monetary compensation.

TP

It's not the same thing as slavery but these kids are definitely being exploited.
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We can agree it's not as bad as slavery.

We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.

And I think we can agree that, with the backdrop of slavery as a major part of our nation's history, the argument that "But we're providing them room and board and an education" is not super duper persuasive in response to the accusation that there's a collusive effort by the powerful to extract the valuable efforts of the not-powerful without monetary compensation.

TP

It's not the same thing as slavery but these kids are definitely being exploited.

Making money off somebody elseís labor doesnít necessarily mean exploitation.  If you are in a capatilistic society, somebody will always be making more money off of your labor than you do.

Itís more of a barter system: a $200,000+ education, celebrity, girls, preferential treatment and a launching pad to the NBA in return for playing basketball.  If you want to get paid, there are several options: D-League, Europe, China. Heck, band together and start your own post-grad circuit.

You donít get to go to college, reap the benefits, and then equate yourself with plantation slaves.


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Offline tenn_smoothie

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Just stop, people.  Comparisons to Nazi Germany and slavery are way too common, and make people sound stupid.

Here's Wendall Carter's mom, complaining about a free ride to a top-10ish university:

Quote
"When you remove all the bling and the bells and the sneakers and all that," she said, "you've paid for a child to come to your school to do what you wanted them to do for you, for free, and you made a lot of money when he did that, and you've got all these rules in place that say he cannot share in any of that. The only other time when labor does not get paid but yet someone else gets profits and the labor is black and the profit is white, is in slavery.

"To be honest with you," she said, "it's nauseating."

Free education, room and board, at a place that you choose, setting you up to become a millionaire.  That sounds exactly like being ripped from your home, put into chains and subjected to forced labor, rape, and beatings with literally no individual freedoms.

Wake Up !!!!  This mentality is the norm in America these days - thank you to the liberal left for creating and then ingraining this type of thinking and black America for accepting it.

Offline PhoSita

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We can agree it's not as bad as slavery.

We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.

And I think we can agree that, with the backdrop of slavery as a major part of our nation's history, the argument that "But we're providing them room and board and an education" is not super duper persuasive in response to the accusation that there's a collusive effort by the powerful to extract the valuable efforts of the not-powerful without monetary compensation.

TP

It's not the same thing as slavery but these kids are definitely being exploited.

Making money off somebody elseís labor doesnít necessarily mean exploitation.  If you are in a capatilistic society, somebody will always be making more money off of your labor than you do.

Itís more of a barter system: a $200,000+ education, celebrity, girls, preferential treatment and a launching pad to the NBA in return for playing basketball.  If you want to get paid, there are several options: D-League, Europe, China. Heck, band together and start your own post-grad circuit.

You donít get to go to college, reap the benefits, and then equate yourself with plantation slaves.

Funny that you mention capitalism.

I think technically it's collusive monopolistic behavior to artificially limit the market for a certain type of services.  Sort of the opposite of how free market capitalism is supposed to work.

I'm not an antitrust expert so I might not be using the terms 100% correctly but I think that's the basic idea of what's going on here.

The NBA, like all American sports leagues, works on a similar principal, of course, but at least it's collectively bargained.


If the G-League provided a legitimate alternative then there might be a discussion here about the NCAA being a "fair trade" of earning capacity for an opportunity to get an education and a social experience etc. etc., but that's a flimsy argument when you look at the practical reality of it. 

If you're a high schooler in North America with hopes of making it to the NBA, your only realistic option is to play at a Division 1 NCAA basketball program and get on the radar of NBA scouts.  You may get a free or subsidized education out of it, but you won't have the choice of making any money from your 1-4 years playing in the NCAA, regardless of how much money you help the NCAA make.  Your ability to make money is not tied in any way to the actual real world value of your ability to play in college, and that's a result of all the Division 1 NCAA programs agreeing not to pay the players anything.
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We can agree it's not as bad as slavery.

We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.

And I think we can agree that, with the backdrop of slavery as a major part of our nation's history, the argument that "But we're providing them room and board and an education" is not super duper persuasive in response to the accusation that there's a collusive effort by the powerful to extract the valuable efforts of the not-powerful without monetary compensation.

TP

It's not the same thing as slavery but these kids are definitely being exploited.

Making money off somebody elseís labor doesnít necessarily mean exploitation.  If you are in a capatilistic society, somebody will always be making more money off of your labor than you do.

Itís more of a barter system: a $200,000+ education, celebrity, girls, preferential treatment and a launching pad to the NBA in return for playing basketball.  If you want to get paid, there are several options: D-League, Europe, China. Heck, band together and start your own post-grad circuit.

You donít get to go to college, reap the benefits, and then equate yourself with plantation slaves.

Funny that you mention capitalism.

I think technically it's collusive monopolistic behavior to artificially limit the market for a certain type of services.  Sort of the opposite of how free market capitalism is supposed to work.

I'm not an antitrust expert so I might not be using the terms 100% correctly but I think that's the basic idea of what's going on here.

The NBA, like all American sports leagues, works on a similar principal, of course, but at least it's collectively bargained.


If the G-League provided a legitimate alternative then there might be a discussion here about the NCAA being a "fair trade" of earning capacity for an opportunity to get an education and a social experience etc. etc., but that's a flimsy argument when you look at the practical reality of it. 

If you're a high schooler in North America with hopes of making it to the NBA, your only realistic option is to play at a Division 1 NCAA basketball program and get on the radar of NBA scouts.  You may get a free or subsidized education out of it, but you won't have the choice of making any money from your 1-4 years playing in the NCAA, regardless of how much money you help the NCAA make.  Your ability to make money is not tied in any way to the actual real world value of your ability to play in college, and that's a result of all the Division 1 NCAA programs agreeing not to pay the players anything.
"If you're a high schooler in North America with hopes of making it to the NBA, your only realistic option is to play at a Division 1 NCAA basketball program"


The age limit for nba is being lowered to 18 in a year. So that's wrong you don't need to play d1.


Offline KGs Knee

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Well, Carter's mother just made sure the rest of the world is aware of how stupid she is.

I don't think that the benefits the top college players receive is at all commensurate with the revenue they help generate for these schools, but comparing a flawed but voluntary system to slavery is the height of idiocy.

Offline Big333223

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We can agree it's not as bad as slavery.

We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.

And I think we can agree that, with the backdrop of slavery as a major part of our nation's history, the argument that "But we're providing them room and board and an education" is not super duper persuasive in response to the accusation that there's a collusive effort by the powerful to extract the valuable efforts of the not-powerful without monetary compensation.

TP

It's not the same thing as slavery but these kids are definitely being exploited.

Making money off somebody elseís labor doesnít necessarily mean exploitation. If you are in a capatilistic society, somebody will always be making more money off of your labor than you do.

Itís more of a barter system: a $200,000+ education, celebrity, girls, preferential treatment and a launching pad to the NBA in return for playing basketball.  If you want to get paid, there are several options: D-League, Europe, China. Heck, band together and start your own post-grad circuit.

You donít get to go to college, reap the benefits, and then equate yourself with plantation slaves.

I never said it did. What the NCAA does by not allowing its player to make money is exploitation.
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We can agree it's not as bad as slavery.

We can also acknowledge that a hugely wealthy entity, predominantly owned and operated by white men, forcing persons -- largely of color -- whose services have significant quantifiable monetary value to exchange those services for something other than money is ... not the greatest optically speaking.

And I think we can agree that, with the backdrop of slavery as a major part of our nation's history, the argument that "But we're providing them room and board and an education" is not super duper persuasive in response to the accusation that there's a collusive effort by the powerful to extract the valuable efforts of the not-powerful without monetary compensation.

TP

It's not the same thing as slavery but these kids are definitely being exploited.

Making money off somebody elseís labor doesnít necessarily mean exploitation. If you are in a capatilistic society, somebody will always be making more money off of your labor than you do.

Itís more of a barter system: a $200,000+ education, celebrity, girls, preferential treatment and a launching pad to the NBA in return for playing basketball.  If you want to get paid, there are several options: D-League, Europe, China. Heck, band together and start your own post-grad circuit.

You donít get to go to college, reap the benefits, and then equate yourself with plantation slaves.

I never said it did. What the NCAA does by not allowing its player to make money is exploitation.
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crack_Baby_Athletic_Association?wprov=sfla1

As with most things South Park has touched on the topic

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wow, she really said that