Author Topic: The cricket thread  (Read 712 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

The cricket thread
« on: March 03, 2018, 01:32:45 PM »

Offline eja117

  • Dennis Johnson
  • ******************
  • Posts: 18905
  • Tommy Points: 1235
I did my best to read about it after watching this advertisement too many times

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeFQBKIQhJ4

The video also discusses a balk in baseball which I also find a bit confusing

I think I get the rules of cricket except I'm still stumped on being stumped. It seems to be a kind of run out that only the wicket keeper can do.

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2018, 05:00:18 PM »

Offline Phantom255x

  • Satch Sanders
  • *********
  • Posts: 9746
  • Tommy Points: 719
  • On To Banner 18!
Actually being stumped would be the batsmen stepping past the white line on the pitch, missing and then the wicketkeeper throws the ball or hits the stumps (ball in hand) before the batsmen steps back on to or behind the line.

Think of it like the batters box in baseball, or the restricted area in basketball.

Similar in cricket.
2018 Mock Trade Deadline (New York Knicks)

Roster: Porzingis, Kanter, Hardaway Jr, Julius Randle, Schroder, Beasley, Alex Abrines, Jarrett Jack, Frank Ntilikina, Lance Thomas, Kyle Singler, Josh Huestis, Ron Baker, Trey Burke, Luke Kornet, Isaiah Hicks

Future Draft Picks: https://www.prosportstransactions.com/basketball/DraftTrades/Future/Knick

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2018, 05:01:28 PM »

Offline csfansince60s

  • Rajon Rondo
  • *****
  • Posts: 5494
  • Tommy Points: 2018
Any sport where the terms "donkey drop" and "sticky wicket" and/or any combination of those words (donkey wicket, sticky donkey, sticky drop) are used , count me out.

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2018, 05:40:37 PM »

Offline eja117

  • Dennis Johnson
  • ******************
  • Posts: 18905
  • Tommy Points: 1235
Actually being stumped would be the batsmen stepping past the white line on the pitch, missing and then the wicketkeeper throws the ball or hits the stumps (ball in hand) before the batsmen steps back on to or behind the line.

Think of it like the batters box in baseball, or the restricted area in basketball.

Similar in cricket.
I thiiiinnkkk I get that. But it's still just a tad confusing. If that were a thing why would they leave the "batters box" prematurely? The odds? Kinda like....in baseball....sorta like running before the pitch? Like they just assume they'll hit it or that the wicket keeper won't catch it?

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2018, 05:41:24 PM »

Offline eja117

  • Dennis Johnson
  • ******************
  • Posts: 18905
  • Tommy Points: 1235
Any sport where the terms "donkey drop" and "sticky wicket" and/or any combination of those words (donkey wicket, sticky donkey, sticky drop) are used , count me out.
They had me at googley. But ...I am not watching a 5 day match or an all day match with a tea break.

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2018, 06:44:58 PM »

Offline gouki88

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3592
  • Tommy Points: 41
Actually being stumped would be the batsmen stepping past the white line on the pitch, missing and then the wicketkeeper throws the ball or hits the stumps (ball in hand) before the batsmen steps back on to or behind the line.

Think of it like the batters box in baseball, or the restricted area in basketball.

Similar in cricket.
I thiiiinnkkk I get that. But it's still just a tad confusing. If that were a thing why would they leave the "batters box" prematurely? The odds? Kinda like....in baseball....sorta like running before the pitch? Like they just assume they'll hit it or that the wicket keeper won't catch it?
Usually stumpings occur after the batsmen has advanced down the pitch but misjudged the ball. Most often against spinners.

Advancing down the pitch is usually done as a means to aggressively take on the bowler. Itís usually done in order to get more momentum in your swing so you can launch it for a boundary, as well as to get in the opposing captains head. Sometimes a batsman may advance and defend, but itís very rare considering how risky the tactic can be.

Itís basically done to make the batsmen hit it harder

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2018, 06:45:29 PM »

Offline gouki88

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3592
  • Tommy Points: 41
Any sport where the terms "donkey drop" and "sticky wicket" and/or any combination of those words (donkey wicket, sticky donkey, sticky drop) are used , count me out.
They had me at googley. But ...I am not watching a 5 day match or an all day match with a tea break.
Thereís nothing like watching a heavily contested test match!

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2018, 06:48:57 PM »

Offline eja117

  • Dennis Johnson
  • ******************
  • Posts: 18905
  • Tommy Points: 1235
Actually being stumped would be the batsmen stepping past the white line on the pitch, missing and then the wicketkeeper throws the ball or hits the stumps (ball in hand) before the batsmen steps back on to or behind the line.

Think of it like the batters box in baseball, or the restricted area in basketball.

Similar in cricket.
I thiiiinnkkk I get that. But it's still just a tad confusing. If that were a thing why would they leave the "batters box" prematurely? The odds? Kinda like....in baseball....sorta like running before the pitch? Like they just assume they'll hit it or that the wicket keeper won't catch it?
Usually stumpings occur after the batsmen has advanced down the pitch but misjudged the ball. Most often against spinners.

Advancing down the pitch is usually done as a means to aggressively take on the bowler. Itís usually done in order to get more momentum in your swing so you can launch it for a boundary, as well as to get in the opposing captains head. Sometimes a batsman may advance and defend, but itís very rare considering how risky the tactic can be.

Itís basically done to make the batsmen hit it harder
Interesting because I'm watching the youtube best game ever played and they're hitting boundaries left and right without practically trying

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2018, 06:51:39 PM »

Offline hwangjini_1

  • Frank Ramsey
  • ************
  • Posts: 12775
  • Tommy Points: 1617
  • bammokja
rather than give up as if everything unknown or different was suspect, we might want to read a bit about the sport. my friends from NZ and India adore the sport.

https://justinelarbalestier.com/blog/2004/02/16/a-beginners-guide-to-cricket/

http://www.dummies.com/sports/cricket-for-dummies-cheat-sheet/

and for those of us who prefer videos to script...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqtpNkMvj5Y
I believe Gandhi is the only person who knew about real democracy ó not democracy as the right to go and buy what you want, but democracy as the responsibility to be accountable to everyone around you. Democracy begins with freedom from hunger, freedom from unemployment, freedom from fear, and freedom from hatred.
- Vandana Shiva

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2018, 08:38:13 PM »

Offline gouki88

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3592
  • Tommy Points: 41
Actually being stumped would be the batsmen stepping past the white line on the pitch, missing and then the wicketkeeper throws the ball or hits the stumps (ball in hand) before the batsmen steps back on to or behind the line.

Think of it like the batters box in baseball, or the restricted area in basketball.

Similar in cricket.
I thiiiinnkkk I get that. But it's still just a tad confusing. If that were a thing why would they leave the "batters box" prematurely? The odds? Kinda like....in baseball....sorta like running before the pitch? Like they just assume they'll hit it or that the wicket keeper won't catch it?
Usually stumpings occur after the batsmen has advanced down the pitch but misjudged the ball. Most often against spinners.

Advancing down the pitch is usually done as a means to aggressively take on the bowler. Itís usually done in order to get more momentum in your swing so you can launch it for a boundary, as well as to get in the opposing captains head. Sometimes a batsman may advance and defend, but itís very rare considering how risky the tactic can be.

Itís basically done to make the batsmen hit it harder
Interesting because I'm watching the youtube best game ever played and they're hitting boundaries left and right without practically trying
What variant of the game was this? Also what team was this?


Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2018, 10:10:33 PM »

Offline eja117

  • Dennis Johnson
  • ******************
  • Posts: 18905
  • Tommy Points: 1235

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2018, 11:56:34 PM »

Offline Phantom255x

  • Satch Sanders
  • *********
  • Posts: 9746
  • Tommy Points: 719
  • On To Banner 18!
It was this one

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qj7i7Vubuyo

The thing is, it also depends on pitch conditions. If a pitch is "dry" with less cracks/grass on it, then typically a team batting can score a ton because the ball being bowled is not moving a lot. Whereas, on a pitch with grass/moisture, the ball can hit the pitch and sort of swing away or into a batsmen, making it difficult for the batsmen to hit shots and score runs. In this video, the pitch was a batting pitch, so it was almost effortless for the batsmen to score runs and hit a ton of boundaries.

And as for the stumping case, you have to realize that stumpings generally happen only when a spinner is bowling (when a bowler tosses up the ball, it bounces on the pitch, then turns away or into the batsmen) and the wicketkeeper is up, so if the batsmen steps up to hit, the ball turns and the batsmen misses, the wicketkeeper collects the ball and then swipes at the stumps (ball in his grasp in his gloves), making him out. It's a RISK for the batsmen to do that for that very reason, since he could try a shot, but get out.

As @Gouki88 thoroughly said (TP @Gouki88!), and you've probably seen in the highlight videos on youtube, but the goal of a spinner is to bowl one that starts off in the air, bounces, and then turns or makes some movement that really confuses the batsmen, or even beats him. IF there was no line on the pitch where the batsmen had to stand on or behind, then the batsmen could easily just try to take multiple steps up, and while the ball is in the air, easily just smack it out of the stadium or something while simply in the air (no spin or bounce) :P

By doing that, the batsmen would have a tremendous advantage. ALSO, remember that in cricket, when you try to manufacture runs, all you do is run straight toward the line next to the bowler, and then back to the line you were batting on for a 2nd run, and so on. IF a batsmen were allowed to take multiple steps and even just make small contact between bat and ball (weak contact), he's already technically halfway towards a run since he stepped up and is already halfway across the pitch, and halfway towards a run (so a very easy run). So this way with the line on the pitch, there's some risk involved for the batsmen, which makes it a little tougher for him, and also gives some advantage to the bowler in that regard (and the fielding team).

Hope all that information makes sense and sort of answers your question!  ;D

2018 Mock Trade Deadline (New York Knicks)

Roster: Porzingis, Kanter, Hardaway Jr, Julius Randle, Schroder, Beasley, Alex Abrines, Jarrett Jack, Frank Ntilikina, Lance Thomas, Kyle Singler, Josh Huestis, Ron Baker, Trey Burke, Luke Kornet, Isaiah Hicks

Future Draft Picks: https://www.prosportstransactions.com/basketball/DraftTrades/Future/Knick

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2018, 01:07:22 AM »

Offline gouki88

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3592
  • Tommy Points: 41
It was this one

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qj7i7Vubuyo
Ouch.

As an Aussie this one hurts. Miss seeing Gilly punish bowlers :'(

It was this one

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qj7i7Vubuyo

The thing is, it also depends on pitch conditions. If a pitch is "dry" with less cracks/grass on it, then typically a team batting can score a ton because the ball being bowled is not moving a lot. Whereas, on a pitch with grass/moisture, the ball can hit the pitch and sort of swing away or into a batsmen, making it difficult for the batsmen to hit shots and score runs. In this video, the pitch was a batting pitch, so it was almost effortless for the batsmen to score runs and hit a ton of boundaries.

And as for the stumping case, you have to realize that stumpings generally happen only when a spinner is bowling (when a bowler tosses up the ball, it bounces on the pitch, then turns away or into the batsmen) and the wicketkeeper is up, so if the batsmen steps up to hit, the ball turns and the batsmen misses, the wicketkeeper collects the ball and then swipes at the stumps (ball in his grasp in his gloves), making him out. It's a RISK for the batsmen to do that for that very reason, since he could try a shot, but get out.

As @Gouki88 thoroughly said (TP @Gouki88!), and you've probably seen in the highlight videos on youtube, but the goal of a spinner is to bowl one that starts off in the air, bounces, and then turns or makes some movement that really confuses the batsmen, or even beats him. IF there was no line on the pitch where the batsmen had to stand on or behind, then the batsmen could easily just try to take multiple steps up, and while the ball is in the air, easily just smack it out of the stadium or something while simply in the air (no spin or bounce) :P

By doing that, the batsmen would have a tremendous advantage. ALSO, remember that in cricket, when you try to manufacture runs, all you do is run straight toward the line next to the bowler, and then back to the line you were batting on for a 2nd run, and so on. IF a batsmen were allowed to take multiple steps and even just make small contact between bat and ball (weak contact), he's already technically halfway towards a run since he stepped up and is already halfway across the pitch, and halfway towards a run (so a very easy run). So this way with the line on the pitch, there's some risk involved for the batsmen, which makes it a little tougher for him, and also gives some advantage to the bowler in that regard (and the fielding team).

Hope all that information makes sense and sort of answers your question!  ;D


Yeah, TP back at ya Phantom! These are all good points.
From an outside perspective it likely can seem all a bit much. There's a whole lot of information to soak up.

Just watch Shane Warne bowling Gatting and Strauss in '05 and you're set ;D

Re: The cricket thread
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2018, 11:10:08 AM »

Offline KGs Knee

  • Danny Ainge
  • **********
  • Posts: 10576
  • Tommy Points: 1180
Crickets are so annoying, with their constant chirping.

Oh...never mind, I see what we're discussing here.  :o