Author Topic: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...  (Read 2319 times)

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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #45 on: February 13, 2018, 01:38:10 PM »

Offline Erik

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The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

I'll share my thoughts on this as someone who probably gets under your skin. I have nothing against being polite to people. I use all the preferred pronouns. I don't say things to people with the intent to upset or offend them. The problem that I personally have with the victim culture is twofold:

1) A victim will not amount to much in society because they've put restrictions on themselves. "I can't get this job because of my gender, sexual identification or skin color." This leads to under-productive people going around shouting that life isn't fair because of the imaginary "man" that is bringing them down. Normally, I wouldn't care much, but I usually have to pay for them to survive while they're insulting me left and right.

2) A victim needs an assailant. The common assailants are straight white males. Through no fault of our own (we didn't choose to be white, male, or by your own admission, straight), we are discriminated against in a variety of ways. The subject line is always "white privilege," although what privilege do we actually have? I was under the impression that all people were born equal. If I have any specific privilege, it is due to my own and my family's good decisions. That doesn't mean that I owe anyone anything. It just means that I have a head start. Hopefully, you will give your child that same head start by making good decisions. Again, I do not owe you anything. You are not my responsibility. I do not mind paying welfare because I do not want someone's kids dying (through no fault of their own) because their parents made a bad choices (it's usually pregnancy out of wedlock, no high school diploma, statistically). But I do not want to hear that I'm also the bad guy.

Then there are the people who placate victims. I refer to these people as "liberals." They're not actually victims themselves, they just want to cash in on the victim gravy train, usually for votes or to feel morally superior to those who realize that it's nuts. Everything that the victim does wrong, these people go on media and social media and argue all day and night that it wasn't their fault, it's institutional <insert excuse here>. They're perpetuating point #1 and doing people a disservice. They're telling folks that it's OK to be a victim. Someone else should pay for your <?> because you're a victim. Vote for us.. we'll give you more free stuff.

Are there bigots in America? Yes. It will never stop. There is no reason to even try to stop it. There are no shortage of bad people in the world looking for nothing more than to just hurt everyone that gets in their way. Is America institutionally a bigoted country? Absolutely not. It's not even close. As someone who has toured a good deal of the world, this is by far the most tolerant country of minorities that exists.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #46 on: February 13, 2018, 02:00:08 PM »

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Subject is on the BPD's decision to honor Red, its not about white privilege. If you want to discuss that matter open up a separate thread to do so.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #47 on: February 13, 2018, 02:39:56 PM »

Online GreenFaith1819

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I see this as harmless and I'm a Black Man.

Red and Bill shared such a special relationship.

I'd guess that to some outside of the Boston Celtics sports knowledge this could - at face value - be warranted as ignorant.

But to REALLY KNOW the relationship these two had...it was special.

As Black people we must honor our own and not EVER forget to do such....BUT - we must NEVER be ignorant of others that help along the way.

I've NEVER seen Race relations in this country at a point where something like this can be blown out of proportion....I'm certain that BPD meant no harm.....



Where have we gone wrong as a country?
There's a lot getting blown out of proportion these days and I think the hypersensitivity only hurts the situation. 

I find it interesting Ayanna Pressley has decided to be so vocal about this and yet she didn't grow up in Boston so probably doesn't have much of a clue about what Red was all about.

Funny thing is that "I" didn't grow up in BOS either - have NEVER been there even though I plan  on it soon, to hopefully see a Celtics game.

I live in Virginia.

I've learned a TON about Red (and his relationship with Bill) by simply reading this blog over the last 9 years or so that I've been a member.

I've also read excerpts of "Red and Me" and gleaned some insight into their relationship.



I'd highly recommend that any folks offended by BPD's move here READ that book.

Like I said before - as a Black Man in this country I certainly understand the angst here but Red Auerbach is someone who DESERVES to be recognized for his part in Civil Rights.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #48 on: February 13, 2018, 03:03:17 PM »

Offline chicagoceltic

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.
In my opinion simply playing the best players does not make him a pioneer or leader.  It was in his best interest.  Maybe it was courageous and worth noting but it was not an all that great and brave of an act and not terribly important to the civil rights movement.  Again, I personally do not take much of an issue with this but I would think there are more deserving people who could have been recognized during BHM.  Hell, there likely were more deserving white Bostonians.

And yet, very few other people were willing to make the same “self-interested” decisions.

Was hiring black people self-interested? Was allowing them to eat at the same lunch counters? Use the same bathrooms? Stay in the same hotels? Pay them the same wages? Make them managers (and in Red’s case, a coach)?

The civil rights movement doesn’t happen without white people.
Agreed completely but my point is there are 28 more important civil rights leaders who could have been recognized before Red.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #49 on: February 13, 2018, 03:10:10 PM »

Offline Roy H.

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.
In my opinion simply playing the best players does not make him a pioneer or leader.  It was in his best interest.  Maybe it was courageous and worth noting but it was not an all that great and brave of an act and not terribly important to the civil rights movement.  Again, I personally do not take much of an issue with this but I would think there are more deserving people who could have been recognized during BHM.  Hell, there likely were more deserving white Bostonians.

And yet, very few other people were willing to make the same “self-interested” decisions.

Was hiring black people self-interested? Was allowing them to eat at the same lunch counters? Use the same bathrooms? Stay in the same hotels? Pay them the same wages? Make them managers (and in Red’s case, a coach)?

The civil rights movement doesn’t happen without white people.
Agreed completely but my point is there are 28 more important civil rights leaders who could have been recognized before Red.

Who had the impact that Red did both locally and nationwide?

I’d be interested in hearing those 28 names.


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #50 on: February 13, 2018, 03:29:00 PM »

Offline chicagoceltic

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Double post.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #51 on: February 13, 2018, 03:30:17 PM »

Offline chicagoceltic

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.
In my opinion simply playing the best players does not make him a pioneer or leader.  It was in his best interest.  Maybe it was courageous and worth noting but it was not an all that great and brave of an act and not terribly important to the civil rights movement.  Again, I personally do not take much of an issue with this but I would think there are more deserving people who could have been recognized during BHM.  Hell, there likely were more deserving white Bostonians.

And yet, very few other people were willing to make the same “self-interested” decisions.

Was hiring black people self-interested? Was allowing them to eat at the same lunch counters? Use the same bathrooms? Stay in the same hotels? Pay them the same wages? Make them managers (and in Red’s case, a coach)?

The civil rights movement doesn’t happen without white people.
Agreed completely but my point is there are 28 more important civil rights leaders who could have been recognized before Red.

Who had the impact that Red did both locally and nationwide?

I’d be interested in hearing those 28 names.
The highlighted words above were a poor choice on my part.  I wold not be surprised if there are 28 more important civil rights leaders from Boston but maybe not.  Either way, it is not important in this discussion.  It is "Black History Month" not "Civil Rights History Month".  I do not have a list of this either but I feel safe saying that there are 28 historically important people of color who could have been recognized before Red. 

Again, I have been saying that this is much ado about nothing.  I do not think that it is outrageous that Red was recognized, I am just saying there were probably better choices to recognize during BHM.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #52 on: February 13, 2018, 03:43:12 PM »

Offline Roy H.

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.
In my opinion simply playing the best players does not make him a pioneer or leader.  It was in his best interest.  Maybe it was courageous and worth noting but it was not an all that great and brave of an act and not terribly important to the civil rights movement.  Again, I personally do not take much of an issue with this but I would think there are more deserving people who could have been recognized during BHM.  Hell, there likely were more deserving white Bostonians.

And yet, very few other people were willing to make the same “self-interested” decisions.

Was hiring black people self-interested? Was allowing them to eat at the same lunch counters? Use the same bathrooms? Stay in the same hotels? Pay them the same wages? Make them managers (and in Red’s case, a coach)?

The civil rights movement doesn’t happen without white people.
Agreed completely but my point is there are 28 more important civil rights leaders who could have been recognized before Red.

Who had the impact that Red did both locally and nationwide?

I’d be interested in hearing those 28 names.
The highlighted words above were a poor choice on my part.  I wold not be surprised if there are 28 more important civil rights leaders from Boston but maybe not.  Either way, it is not important in this discussion.  It is "Black History Month" not "Civil Rights History Month".  I do not have a list of this either but I feel safe saying that there are 28 historically important people of color who could have been recognized before Red. 

Again, I have been saying that this is much ado about nothing.  I do not think that it is outrageous that Red was recognized, I am just saying there were probably better choices to recognize during BHM.

It’s not “blacks who made history” month, though. February was chosen in part because of Lincoln’s birthday.

I’m under the impression that the Boston Police wanted to run a series of tweets featuring local individuals who made an impact on black history, while sharing pics of those individuals interacting somehow with Boston Police. I support that. At the same time, I didn’t see any other tributes on their twitter page prior to the Red one. If Red was one of the first and only honored individuals, that changes things quite a lot.


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #53 on: February 13, 2018, 03:59:47 PM »

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I’m under the impression that the Boston Police wanted to run a series of tweets featuring local individuals who made an impact on black history, while sharing pics of those individuals interacting somehow with Boston Police. I support that. At the same time, I didn’t see any other tributes on their twitter page prior to the Red one. If Red was one of the first and only honored individuals, that changes things quite a lot.
I may have spoken too soon when I said it's daily. But it's certainly some sort of a series. They started with Russell on February 3rd, and retweeted him after removing Red. There hasn't been anyone else yet (well, except for the numerous black policemen acknowledged for their promotions).
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #54 on: February 13, 2018, 04:16:24 PM »

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Yeah, I have done a number searches and found only that they honored Bill Russell on Feb 3 but can't find a list of other people they have honored.