Author Topic: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...  (Read 2323 times)

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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #30 on: February 12, 2018, 08:59:56 PM »

Offline GreenFaith1819

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I see this as harmless and I'm a Black Man.

Red and Bill shared such a special relationship.

I'd guess that to some outside of the Boston Celtics sports knowledge this could - at face value - be warranted as ignorant.

But to REALLY KNOW the relationship these two had...it was special.

As Black people we must honor our own and not EVER forget to do such....BUT - we must NEVER be ignorant of others that help along the way.

I've NEVER seen Race relations in this country at a point where something like this can be blown out of proportion....I'm certain that BPD meant no harm.....



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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #31 on: February 12, 2018, 09:08:21 PM »

Offline Roy H.

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Quote
the group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

...

he group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The event inspired schools and communities nationwide to organize local celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures.

I personally don't care about black history month. My blackness doesn't end on the 28th so every month is BHM for me. I just don't see why they'd honor white people who allowed black people to make history, that just doesn't make sense to me.

I wasn’t aware of Lincoln’s black heritage. You would think that a week dedicated solely to black achievement would have advertised Lincoln’s blackness more prominently, so as to educate the public about this person most assumed was white.


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #32 on: February 12, 2018, 11:05:48 PM »

Offline Kuberski33

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I see this as harmless and I'm a Black Man.

Red and Bill shared such a special relationship.

I'd guess that to some outside of the Boston Celtics sports knowledge this could - at face value - be warranted as ignorant.

But to REALLY KNOW the relationship these two had...it was special.

As Black people we must honor our own and not EVER forget to do such....BUT - we must NEVER be ignorant of others that help along the way.

I've NEVER seen Race relations in this country at a point where something like this can be blown out of proportion....I'm certain that BPD meant no harm.....



Where have we gone wrong as a country?
There's a lot getting blown out of proportion these days and I think the hypersensitivity only hurts the situation. 

I find it interesting Ayanna Pressley has decided to be so vocal about this and yet she didn't grow up in Boston so probably doesn't have much of a clue about what Red was all about. 
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 12:00:46 AM by Kuberski33 »

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2018, 08:06:51 AM »

Offline Celtics4ever

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What's next folks not revering Pres. Lincoln because although he did the Emancipation Proclamation it does not count because he was white?

This social justice crap is sometimes hypocritically absurd.   I can see that you might not want to honor Red during Black History Month as Red was not black.   But the feedback generated and some of the people comments are pretty absurd.

I guess this goes against the narrative of Boston being a racist city so it is something people don't want it known.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/editorials/2017/12/17/racism-bleeds-boston-black-talent/BgvXk4gb3FlKfYKMXKkUdL/story.html

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2018, 11:11:41 AM »

Offline Erik

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I sense some dissension within the "everyone's a victim except straight white males" bigoted sect. It's not too late to realize that it's nuts. I made the change 3 years ago.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2018, 11:31:00 AM »

Offline blackbird

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I love the irony in the comments here. White boys getting triggered by something that doesn't affect them, then complaining that the real problem in society is hypersensitivity. I'm reminded of something about glass houses and throwing stones.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #36 on: February 13, 2018, 11:39:35 AM »

Offline Roy H.

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I love the irony in the comments here. White boys getting triggered by something that doesn't affect them, then complaining that the real problem in society is hypersensitivity. I'm reminded of something about glass houses and throwing stones.

The constant cries of “I’m offended”, “I demand an apology!” and “Racism!” affect everybody, and people are in no way hypocritical for pushing back on that.


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2018, 11:55:43 AM »

Offline Erik

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I love the irony in the comments here. White boys getting triggered by something that doesn't affect them, then complaining that the real problem in society is hypersensitivity. I'm reminded of something about glass houses and throwing stones.

You're forgetting that the reason we're talking about this in the first place is that people were offended that a white person was honored during black history month for doing something positive for the black community.

Victim mentality knows no boundaries or gray area. You're either a victim or you're not. It means that I am not surprised at all about the backlash -- they are very, very consistent. Once you start parsing what is acceptable and what isn't... you know... using logic, you start losing your personal power of being able to target whoever you want (as long as it's not a superior member on the victim hierarchy), whatever you want and whenever you want.

I'm more surprised that people are starting to see it for what it is.

Also, your use of "white boys" offends me. It's a known pejorative against whites. Oh wait I forgot that I have no basis to complain. Carry on.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2018, 12:00:22 PM »

Offline kraidstar

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I love the irony in the comments here. White boys getting triggered by something that doesn't affect them, then complaining that the real problem in society is hypersensitivity. I'm reminded of something about glass houses and throwing stones.

No, the irony is that people who supposedly care about Black History are complaining about Red Auerbach getting credit for his role in Black History.

People are taking what was an inspiring, historic story about acceptance and teamwork and soiling it with their own narrow agendas.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #39 on: February 13, 2018, 12:07:31 PM »

Offline kozlodoev

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I love the irony in the comments here. White boys getting triggered by something that doesn't affect them, then complaining that the real problem in society is hypersensitivity. I'm reminded of something about glass houses and throwing stones.
I'm curious. When black folks come to "white boys" to sermon them what they should and shouldn't do about civil justice, do they think that being insufferable pricks actually strengthens their case?

Because let me tell you, that situation has two outcomes: at best, you're getting tuned out, and at worst, you're adding another body to the basket of deplorables, or whatever Clinton called that.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #40 on: February 13, 2018, 12:41:13 PM »

Offline nickagneta

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LET'S STOP THE LABELING OF OTHERS IN DEROGATORY TERMS RIGHT THERE. IT'S AGAINST THE RULES OF THIS SITE

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #41 on: February 13, 2018, 12:56:19 PM »

Offline chicagoceltic

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some. 
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #42 on: February 13, 2018, 01:06:43 PM »

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2018, 01:23:05 PM »

Offline chicagoceltic

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.
In my opinion simply playing the best players does not make him a pioneer or leader.  It was in his best interest.  Maybe it was courageous and worth noting but it was not an all that great and brave of an act and not terribly important to the civil rights movement.  Again, I personally do not take much of an issue with this but I would think there are more deserving people who could have been recognized during BHM.  Hell, there likely were more deserving white Bostonians.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2018, 01:30:12 PM »

Offline Roy H.

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This is much ado about nothing from both sides of the “argument”.  In my opinion it was a poor and unecessary decision to name Red Auerbach like this.  He may have led a number of firsts in the NBA but it seems he did so in the interest of winning and not with any sort of civil rights intention.  Unless I am missing something he was not a civil rights trailblazer and was not important enough to be recognized during BHM.  That being said, he is important in Boston and he did draft the first black player, had the first all black starting lineup etc etc etc.  In a town, rightly or wrongly, seen as a racist town (especially in sports) I can understand wanting to highlight Red and what he did.  Are there more deserving people of color who could/should have been recognized?  Yes.  Is recognizing Red now some sort of atrocity worth becoming outraged over?  No.  Is this worth being outraged over the outrage over?  No.

The last thought in that paragraph brings up something that kind of gets under my skin:  The people who hate the PC culture have become so upset and vocal over anything that they deem as oversensitivity that they come across as as oversensitive as what they rail against.  Sometimes (most times?) being PC is not being oversensitive and is just being kind and polite.  It seems wrong to me that being kind and polite is now seen as wrong by some.

Of course Red was a civil rights pioneer. Treating blacks equally - for whatever reason - might sound like common sense now, but the era was completely different.  That Red played guys regardless of color, supported them when the protested, and treated his guys like equals makes him a civil rights leader.
In my opinion simply playing the best players does not make him a pioneer or leader.  It was in his best interest.  Maybe it was courageous and worth noting but it was not an all that great and brave of an act and not terribly important to the civil rights movement.  Again, I personally do not take much of an issue with this but I would think there are more deserving people who could have been recognized during BHM.  Hell, there likely were more deserving white Bostonians.

And yet, very few other people were willing to make the same “self-interested” decisions.

Was hiring black people self-interested? Was allowing them to eat at the same lunch counters? Use the same bathrooms? Stay in the same hotels? Pay them the same wages? Make them managers (and in Red’s case, a coach)?

The civil rights movement doesn’t happen without white people.


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