Author Topic: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...  (Read 2446 times)

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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2018, 07:28:48 PM »

Online Celtics4ever

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So let me get this straight, folks are angry at an example of person who broke down racial barriers because his skin color????  I smell some hypocrisy!

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2018, 07:31:26 PM »

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Are there not 28 black people the city of Boston could honor?

Also, if the idea is to honor a white person who allowed other black people to make history, then what would be the point of black history month?

The point is to honor and remember our joint history by recognizing the efforts of those who changed civil rights in a positive way.

I mean, not to be flip, but who contributed more to civil rights, George Washington Carver or Red Auerbach?

If that was the case it'd be Joint History Month or something.

Ford's message on the observance of black history month says we must "seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history."

So just stick to honoring Black Americans or don't call it Black History Month.

As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.

I'm not sure what Red's stance was in terms of race and basketball but I assume it was something like "I don't care if you're black, white, or blue, if you can put the ball through the hoop, I want you on my team".

If that's the case, then I really don't give Red credit for signing black players. If anything I'd give credit to the black players for being so good Red had to sign them.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2018, 07:31:45 PM »

Offline nickagneta

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I understand the sentiment behind honoring Red Auerbach, but during Black History Month, it just wasn't a smart move. I mean the BPD took down the tweet then immediately went to honoring Bill Russell. Why not just name Bill in the first place considering all the racism he had to overcome in this city besides doing what he did to advance the plight of blacks in Boston?

I understand what the are trying to do with the Red Auerbach posted and agree he helped to end discrimination against blacks in sports. But it was a very stupid move to make him one of 28 honorees this month.

It seems to me what the Boston Police Department was trying to accomplish here was to acknowledge and honor those in the Boston community that contributed the most towards the goal of racial equality, specifically for black people.

By that measure, Red absolutely deserves to be honored, based on the merits of his efforts and accomplishments towards the goal of racial equality for black people.  To say that it was a "very stupid move" implies that Red should not have been honored, not based on the merits, but due to the color of his skin.  That is the definition of racism.

The BPD was right to honor Red, and very wrong to succumb to the unwarranted and unjust public backlash they received.  This doesn't mean they couldn't, and shouldn't, also have honored Bill Russell.  There's room to honor both.
It's a stupid move because its just dump PR. Having not honored Russell already there was no reason to honor Auerbach. And its not racism to not honor a white man in black history month, but it is a month about honoring black people. You don't try to honor Martin Luther King on President's Day. You don't try to make more people aware about prostate cancer on National Breast Cancer Day.

The BPD should have had more sense than to honor Red when there are still dozens of black people they didn't honor that was just as worthy. Red did a lot for the black athlete but celebrate that at another time. Not black history month.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2018, 07:32:12 PM »

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So let me get this straight, folks are angry at an example of person who broke down racial barriers because his skin color????  I smell some hypocrisy!

Yeah. Modern civil rights: judge the person by skin color first, rather than the content of their character or quality of their actions


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2018, 07:35:46 PM »

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I understand the sentiment behind honoring Red Auerbach, but during Black History Month, it just wasn't a smart move. I mean the BPD took down the tweet then immediately went to honoring Bill Russell. Why not just name Bill in the first place considering all the racism he had to overcome in this city besides doing what he did to advance the plight of blacks in Boston?

I understand what the are trying to do with the Red Auerbach posted and agree he helped to end discrimination against blacks in sports. But it was a very stupid move to make him one of 28 honorees this month.

It seems to me what the Boston Police Department was trying to accomplish here was to acknowledge and honor those in the Boston community that contributed the most towards the goal of racial equality, specifically for black people.

By that measure, Red absolutely deserves to be honored, based on the merits of his efforts and accomplishments towards the goal of racial equality for black people.  To say that it was a "very stupid move" implies that Red should not have been honored, not based on the merits, but due to the color of his skin.  That is the definition of racism.

The BPD was right to honor Red, and very wrong to succumb to the unwarranted and unjust public backlash they received.  This doesn't mean they couldn't, and shouldn't, also have honored Bill Russell.  There's room to honor both.
It's a stupid move because its just dump PR. Having not honored Russell already there was no reason to honor Auerbach. And its not racism to not honor a white man in black history month, but it is a month about honoring black people. You don't try to honor Martin Luther King on President's Day. You don't try to make more people aware about prostate cancer on National Breast Cancer Day.

The BPD should have had more sense than to honor Red when there are still dozens of black people they didn't honor that was just as worthy. Red did a lot for the black athlete but celebrate that at another time. Not black history month.

With all due respect, Nick, you're wrong on this one.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2018, 07:38:27 PM »

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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2018, 07:39:54 PM »

Offline nickagneta

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I understand the sentiment behind honoring Red Auerbach, but during Black History Month, it just wasn't a smart move. I mean the BPD took down the tweet then immediately went to honoring Bill Russell. Why not just name Bill in the first place considering all the racism he had to overcome in this city besides doing what he did to advance the plight of blacks in Boston?

I understand what the are trying to do with the Red Auerbach posted and agree he helped to end discrimination against blacks in sports. But it was a very stupid move to make him one of 28 honorees this month.

It seems to me what the Boston Police Department was trying to accomplish here was to acknowledge and honor those in the Boston community that contributed the most towards the goal of racial equality, specifically for black people.

By that measure, Red absolutely deserves to be honored, based on the merits of his efforts and accomplishments towards the goal of racial equality for black people.  To say that it was a "very stupid move" implies that Red should not have been honored, not based on the merits, but due to the color of his skin.  That is the definition of racism.

The BPD was right to honor Red, and very wrong to succumb to the unwarranted and unjust public backlash they received.  This doesn't mean they couldn't, and shouldn't, also have honored Bill Russell.  There's room to honor both.
It's a stupid move because its just dump PR. Having not honored Russell already there was no reason to honor Auerbach. And its not racism to not honor a white man in black history month, but it is a month about honoring black people. You don't try to honor Martin Luther King on President's Day. You don't try to make more people aware about prostate cancer on National Breast Cancer Day.

The BPD should have had more sense than to honor Red when there are still dozens of black people they didn't honor that was just as worthy. Red did a lot for the black athlete but celebrate that at another time. Not black history month.

With all due respect, Nick, you're wrong on this one.
Will agree to disagree

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2018, 07:48:54 PM »

Offline rocknrollforyoursoul

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Are there not 28 black people the city of Boston could honor?

Also, if the idea is to honor a white person who allowed other black people to make history, then what would be the point of black history month?

The point is to honor and remember our joint history by recognizing the efforts of those who changed civil rights in a positive way.

I mean, not to be flip, but who contributed more to civil rights, George Washington Carver or Red Auerbach?

If that was the case it'd be Joint History Month or something.

Ford's message on the observance of black history month says we must "seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history."

So just stick to honoring Black Americans or don't call it Black History Month.

As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.

I'm not sure what Red's stance was in terms of race and basketball but I assume it was something like "I don't care if you're black, white, or blue, if you can put the ball through the hoop, I want you on my team".

If that's the case, then I really don't give Red credit for signing black players. If anything I'd give credit to the black players for being so good Red had to sign them.

I'm not sure if there's an "official" definition of Black History Month, but it seems to me that the concept of "black history" can and should include not only black people who advanced equal rights, but also people of other ethnicities (including whites) who helped advance equal rights for blacks.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2018, 08:03:07 PM »

Offline CelticD

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Are there not 28 black people the city of Boston could honor?

Also, if the idea is to honor a white person who allowed other black people to make history, then what would be the point of black history month?

The point is to honor and remember our joint history by recognizing the efforts of those who changed civil rights in a positive way.

I mean, not to be flip, but who contributed more to civil rights, George Washington Carver or Red Auerbach?

If that was the case it'd be Joint History Month or something.

Ford's message on the observance of black history month says we must "seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history."

So just stick to honoring Black Americans or don't call it Black History Month.

As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.

I'm not sure what Red's stance was in terms of race and basketball but I assume it was something like "I don't care if you're black, white, or blue, if you can put the ball through the hoop, I want you on my team".

If that's the case, then I really don't give Red credit for signing black players. If anything I'd give credit to the black players for being so good Red had to sign them.

I'm not sure if there's an "official" definition of Black History Month, but it seems to me that the concept of "black history" can and should include not only black people who advanced equal rights, but also people of other ethnicities (including whites) who helped advance equal rights for blacks.

Carter G. Woodson and the prominent minister Jesse E. Moorland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by black Americans and other peoples of African descent...the group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The event inspired schools and communities nationwide to organize local celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures.

I personally don't care about black history month. My blackness doesn't end on the 28th so every month is BHM for me. I just don't see why they'd honor white people who allowed black people to make history, that just doesn't make sense to me.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2018, 08:05:32 PM »

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As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.
Well, if the contribution of white people to the civil rights movement will remain a technicality that's not worth mentioning, please don't come to me with your grievances about dismantling the "systems of oppression" any more. I'll go about this issue as I see fit and not as you'll see me do. Thanks.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2018, 08:16:42 PM »

Offline CelticD

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As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.
Well, if the contribution of white people to the civil rights movement will remain a technicality that's not worth mentioning, please don't come to me with your grievances about dismantling the "systems of oppression" any more. I'll go about this issue as I see fit and not as you'll see me do. Thanks.

Huh? I didn't come at you with any grievance about dismantling anything. I'm not saying those people aren't worth mentioning, but I can't compare them to the black men and women who actually died trying to get those papers signed. You're not going to give more credit to the politician who ends a war more than the actual soldiers themselves right?

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2018, 08:19:09 PM »

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Quote
I'm not sure what Red's stance was in terms of race and basketball but I assume it was something like "I don't care if you're black, white, or blue, if you can put the ball through the hoop, I want you on my team".

If that's the case, then I really don't give Red credit for signing black players. If anything I'd give credit to the black players for being so good Red had to sign them.

I think you’re not fully appreciating the climate that Red was managing a very public business in. If ending segregation was as easy as “if you’re good, you’re hired”, there would have been no need for a civil rights movement. Hell, there wouldn’t be racism in the first place.


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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2018, 08:23:43 PM »

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As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.
Well, if the contribution of white people to the civil rights movement will remain a technicality that's not worth mentioning, please don't come to me with your grievances about dismantling the "systems of oppression" any more. I'll go about this issue as I see fit and not as you'll see me do. Thanks.

Huh? I didn't come at you with any grievance about dismantling anything. I'm not saying those people aren't worth mentioning, but I can't compare them to the black men and women who actually died trying to get those papers signed. You're not going to give more credit to the politician who ends a war more than the actual soldiers themselves right?
See, that's the problem: the original post exists because a bunch of people said exactly that. They got all prickly that BPD mentioned a white guy during BHM.

And that's the proverbial you, not you personally. BLM likes to pile on white folks about white privilege all the time, but mention a white dude who actively helped advance the statute of blacks... and here we are.
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Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #28 on: February 12, 2018, 08:43:38 PM »

Offline CelticD

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As far as your question goes, I don't like the way it's posited. Technically the white people who wrote and signed the Black Constitution did more than any individual black person, but I'll never say those people contributed more to Civil Rights than the black men and women who gave their lives trying to get those amendments signed in the first place.
Well, if the contribution of white people to the civil rights movement will remain a technicality that's not worth mentioning, please don't come to me with your grievances about dismantling the "systems of oppression" any more. I'll go about this issue as I see fit and not as you'll see me do. Thanks.

Huh? I didn't come at you with any grievance about dismantling anything. I'm not saying those people aren't worth mentioning, but I can't compare them to the black men and women who actually died trying to get those papers signed. You're not going to give more credit to the politician who ends a war more than the actual soldiers themselves right?
See, that's the problem: the original post exists because a bunch of people said exactly that. They got all prickly that BPD mentioned a white guy during BHM.

And that's the proverbial you, not you personally. BLM likes to pile on white folks about white privilege all the time, but mention a white dude who actively helped advance the statute of blacks... and here we are.

Like I said, I don't really care about BHM, but the intent of BHM was to honor black American achievements. If that's the case, then there's no reason to honor other races for black achievements because then the month should just be named something else.

I just can't believe there aren't 28 black people that BPD could honor for BHM.

Re: Boston police sent Black History Month tribute to Red Auerbach...
« Reply #29 on: February 12, 2018, 08:54:29 PM »

Offline CelticD

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Quote
I'm not sure what Red's stance was in terms of race and basketball but I assume it was something like "I don't care if you're black, white, or blue, if you can put the ball through the hoop, I want you on my team".

If that's the case, then I really don't give Red credit for signing black players. If anything I'd give credit to the black players for being so good Red had to sign them.

I think you’re not fully appreciating the climate that Red was managing a very public business in. If ending segregation was as easy as “if you’re good, you’re hired”, there would have been no need for a civil rights movement. Hell, there wouldn’t be racism in the first place.

Like I said I'm not familiar with what his stance was, did Red sign these players BECAUSE they were black, or did he sign them because they were good ball players who happened to be black.

I don't respect the former, and I don't think the latter is worthy of praise, so either way I'm not sold on Red. Much props to the black players because even though I'm sure Red faced scrutiny, the players couldn't have had it any easier. Even in the article listed in the OP, Russell himself called Boston a flea market of racism, and he's the biggest reason for why fans can boast about 17 championships.