Author Topic: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from  (Read 5070 times)

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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #135 on: January 13, 2018, 12:11:44 AM »

Offline byennie

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I'm not going to get too much into the arguments on here because let's be honest - nobody is going to convince another to change their stance about Trump at this point.

But a few thoughts:

If a liberal politician, let's say a Democratic governor of a blue-leaning state, said something demeaning about poorly-educated, low-skilled Caucasians living in rural parts of the state - perhaps "why would we want these people from a ___hole part of the state with no skills to come here to work?", essentially insinuating that they're lesser people because they're poor and have nothing to offer -  many of these rural Trump supporters and the right-wing media would be absolutely livid.  As well they should be.  Rural conservatives absolutely loathe being looked down upon by "coastal elites" and others.  But alas, by defending Trump they fail to see the double standard. To say such a generalized, inaccurate, and despicable comment is completely disgraceful and completely indefensible, no matter who you are.  This seems to come standard with Trump, however, so no surprises here.

"In regards to Senator Durbin’s accusation, we do not recall the president saying these comments specifically..." - Senator Cotton and Senator Purdue.  Please.  Like anyone would ever forget such inflammatory comments during a senatorial meeting.  Your lies are just as bad as Trump's denial of what he said.

Finally, I'd like to revisit a remark by James Comey: "Lordy, I hope there are tapes".  Alright they're probably aren't any tapes, but imagine how powerful that soundbyte would be in the upcoming midterms and 2020.

Actually Liberals have been saying derogatory things continuously

Hillary " Black men are super predators "

Hillary " basket of deplorables"

Bernie " white people don't know what it's like to be poor

I could go on....

Oh Lordy, James Comey is just a swell all American boy that leaked to the media to get a special council against Trump .

Oh Lordy, James Comey the choir boy who exonerated Hillary before ever even interviewing her

Oh lordy

Would it be so hard to just defend Trump directly, if the criticism is so unfair?

You think either "side" is going to run out of examples of bad behavior on the other side? We would get literally nothing done, ever, if everyone just wants to play the "what about" game.

We teach our kids that "he started it", or "he did it first" aren't valid excuses. Maybe we should try to reach that high mark, too.

Obama and Hillary are both private citizens right now that hold no public office. Maybe we could not drag them into every. single. thread. Whatever your worst example of "liberal" behavior is, is no more valid than treating conservatives like they all belong to neo-nazi groups. It's intellectually dishonest and childish.
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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #136 on: January 13, 2018, 12:22:39 AM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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He called a bunch of crapholes what they are....crapholes.  He didn't call the people from there anything.  Was it insensitive?  Yes.  Was it racist like the left want people to think?  No.  And let's be honest, he could cure Cancer and people would say "yeah well why didn't he cure AIDS?"  So he's probably gonna continue to be a 70 year old spoiled child on Twitter and say whatever he wants.

A few responses:
It wasn't only that he called the countries crapholes, he made it clear he didn't want people from those countries coming to America. In addition to being insensitive, it doesn't match up well to the reality that immigrants from many impoverished countries often are bright, educated, good people.  The underlying message from Trump was that the people from craphole countries are not worthy. When he juxtaposes predominantly black/brown populated countries with a predominantly white populated country and says he wants the people from the white country but not from the craphole countries, he is being more than insensitive. He is being either racist or stupid (I don't think he's a racist, btw).  Neither is very positive.   Further, if Trump hadn't provided fuel through previous statements that have been racially insensitive, perhaps this would not have become the maelstrom it has.  It is of his own making and the political Left is more than happy to collude with him on this.

I've been listening all day to people on the RIGHT who are outraged by his comment -- you're characterization that this is about people on the Left jumping to conclusions is an incomplete analysis.

There are definitely people who will hate him no matter what, but Donald Trump hasn't "cured cancer" in any politically metaphoric way.  If he had, I am guessing a lot of people would come around. 

Lastly, I don't really want my President acting like a spoiled child on Twitter (as if that is the only reasonable response he could have to his mistreatment).  Do you?
   

Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #137 on: January 13, 2018, 12:35:27 AM »

Online Roy H.

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Let's stay civil and on subject. This thread isn't about what Obama did or the Clinton Foundation.
I appreciate this comment, but it's inevitable. Does anyone actually know why there always ends up being efforts to highlight perceived double standards or hypocrisy?

I thinks it’s natural when somebody expresses outrage, yet didn’t under similar circumstances previously.  It’s legit to wonder if they’re truly outraged, or whether they’re exaggerating to score political points.

Natural, maybe, but it needs to be called for what it is in a political debate: totally irrelevant. It's literally a logical fallacy in the most formal sense- "tu quoque". Now popularly know as "whataboutism". Of course, these days I'm an elitist if I get too debate-team-y on the Internet.

Both sides do it, of course, but I find special irony when the personal responsibility advocates make it a go-to move. God forbid the POTUS be judged on his own merits.

We teach kids on the playground that "he started it" or "he did it first" aren't valid excuses, and yet, it's in practically everything political thread like clockwork. Sigh.

It’s more a recognition that the person you’re debating has no principles.  If somebody can’t say “yes, _______ was wrong when he did something similar”, then s/he is part of the problem. Whataboutism isn’t used to excuse behavior, it’s to show people what giant, shallow hypocrites they are. Pointing out hypocrisy and a lack of principled argument seems to have a place in a debate.


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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #138 on: January 13, 2018, 12:49:02 AM »

Online Roy H.

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Let's stay civil and on subject. This thread isn't about what Obama did or the Clinton Foundation.
I appreciate this comment, but it's inevitable. Does anyone actually know why there always ends up being efforts to highlight perceived double standards or hypocrisy?

I thinks it’s natural when somebody expresses outrage, yet didn’t under similar circumstances previously.  It’s legit to wonder if they’re truly outraged, or whether they’re exaggerating to score political points.
Depends on who is providing the definition of "similar circumstances".

The bulk of these "similar circumstances" seems to have taken place when I was in high school so I'd just like to apologize to whoever was monitoring me for the places I was going online at the time.

Congrats on your recent high school graduation. Class of 2016?

No, I graduated high school in the 90s. 2016 was the year I went from correctly identifying Donald Trump as a white supremacist charlatan to carrying water for him by incessantly whatabouting Bill Clinton in a forum supposedly about current events. Unless I’m muddling things up somehow.

2016 is also the year that Obama described Libya as a “[crap] show”, obviously showcasing his own racism toward North Africans, along with the British and French (whom he blamed for the failure of his own disastrous policy in Libya).

But that’s totally distinguishable, because “show” and “hole” are different words, and unlike the crap show, the crap holes were crap holes before Obama got elected. Unless you mean the crap hole in Chicago, which Obama certainly helped reach its current level of crap. 

I’ve got no problem with Obama using vulgar language to describe a foreign country. It’s a recognition of the situation in the ground (that he created). The issue is when hypocrites excuse one, but not the other.


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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #139 on: January 13, 2018, 01:08:46 AM »

Offline nickagneta

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Let's stay civil and on subject. This thread isn't about what Obama did or the Clinton Foundation.
I appreciate this comment, but it's inevitable. Does anyone actually know why there always ends up being efforts to highlight perceived double standards or hypocrisy?

I thinks it’s natural when somebody expresses outrage, yet didn’t under similar circumstances previously.  It’s legit to wonder if they’re truly outraged, or whether they’re exaggerating to score political points.

Natural, maybe, but it needs to be called for what it is in a political debate: totally irrelevant. It's literally a logical fallacy in the most formal sense- "tu quoque". Now popularly know as "whataboutism". Of course, these days I'm an elitist if I get too debate-team-y on the Internet.

Both sides do it, of course, but I find special irony when the personal responsibility advocates make it a go-to move. God forbid the POTUS be judged on his own merits.

We teach kids on the playground that "he started it" or "he did it first" aren't valid excuses, and yet, it's in practically everything political thread like clockwork. Sigh.

It’s more a recognition that the person you’re debating has no principles.  If somebody can’t say “yes, _______ was wrong when he did something similar”, then s/he is part of the problem. Whataboutism isn’t used to excuse behavior, it’s to show people what giant, shallow hypocrites they are. Pointing out hypocrisy and a lack of principled argument seems to have a place in a debate.
Wow, that is wrong and insulting on so many levels. So people who don't agree with your view of the situation have no principles? They have to agree your way is the right way or else they will be labeled wrong, hypocrites and without principles? There just us no other way to look at the situation

What Trump did was clearly different than what Obama did. Obama called the situation in Libya because of the British handling of the situation a crapshow. It was a description of the event and goings on in Libya created by the UK. That word didn't describe the country itself or the people who are Libyans. Instead it was a rebuke to the UK government in the handling of the Libya situation.

Trump, after calling Mexican thieves and rapists, after calling Neo-Nazus fine people, after twice having an immigration ban halted because it targteed a certain ethnicity and religion, then goes and calls African, almost completely black countries crapholes and wants Haitians out of here, while at the same time wanting almostly completely white Norwegians to emmigrate here.

If this was an out of the blue mistake, an out of character slip....no big deal. He apologizes for a slip of his lip and all is well. But this is a clear pattern of racist comments and words used pretty consistently by this president. So yeah, there is reason to be outraged.

Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #140 on: January 13, 2018, 01:10:02 AM »

Offline KGs Knee

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Whataboutism isn’t used to excuse behavior, it’s to show people what giant, shallow hypocrites they are. Pointing out hypocrisy and a lack of principled argument seems to have a place in a debate.

Well, I think some people do use 'whataboutism' to deflect.  And that's what gives the people who aren't being hypocrits just cause to voice their complaints.

But it is also a tried and true method hypocrits have always used.  Now it just has a catchy name.

Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #141 on: January 13, 2018, 01:37:47 AM »

Offline byennie

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Let's stay civil and on subject. This thread isn't about what Obama did or the Clinton Foundation.
I appreciate this comment, but it's inevitable. Does anyone actually know why there always ends up being efforts to highlight perceived double standards or hypocrisy?

I thinks it’s natural when somebody expresses outrage, yet didn’t under similar circumstances previously.  It’s legit to wonder if they’re truly outraged, or whether they’re exaggerating to score political points.

Natural, maybe, but it needs to be called for what it is in a political debate: totally irrelevant. It's literally a logical fallacy in the most formal sense- "tu quoque". Now popularly know as "whataboutism". Of course, these days I'm an elitist if I get too debate-team-y on the Internet.

Both sides do it, of course, but I find special irony when the personal responsibility advocates make it a go-to move. God forbid the POTUS be judged on his own merits.

We teach kids on the playground that "he started it" or "he did it first" aren't valid excuses, and yet, it's in practically everything political thread like clockwork. Sigh.

It’s more a recognition that the person you’re debating has no principles.  If somebody can’t say “yes, _______ was wrong when he did something similar”, then s/he is part of the problem. Whataboutism isn’t used to excuse behavior, it’s to show people what giant, shallow hypocrites they are. Pointing out hypocrisy and a lack of principled argument seems to have a place in a debate.

No, actually it really doesn't. It's a logical fallacy and would be dismissed as such in a formal setting.

Now don't get me wrong, every discussion isn't a formal debate, but whataboutism is rarely constructive, and if on top of that you're just out to prove that other people are hypocrites then congratulations, you're tossing ad hominem attacks into the mix and just trying to feel superior.

I'm sure some people will roll their eyes at "tu quoque" and "ad hominem" and so forth, but the terms exist for a reason. They are known to be weak arguments and deflections from real debate.

At some point, it becomes "my guy took a dump in the road, but you can't complain because I heard your guy did too", and now we're living in the idiocracy.

TL;DR; whataboutism is weak sauce, shows a lack of real argument, and isn't the same as simply pointing out hypocrisy on occasion.
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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #142 on: January 13, 2018, 01:44:28 AM »

Offline KGs Knee

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TL;DR; whataboutism is weak sauce, shows a lack of real argument, and isn't the same as simply pointing out hypocrisy on occasion.

Hypocrisy should always be pointed out.

Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #143 on: January 13, 2018, 02:41:24 AM »

Offline Quetzalcoatl

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1.) Saying that all Republican politicians can't be criticized until the other side is perfect across the board is clearly a ridiculous position to hold.

2.) Liberals aren't going to get any conservatives to change their support for the GOP by lecturing them

Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #144 on: January 13, 2018, 04:20:08 AM »

Offline GreenFaith1819

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Pres. Trump is becoming more depressing to me than anything else.

I've actually had a headache for most of the day thinking about his comments, here...his past comments.

I still don't believe he's racist - nor many of the GOP.

BUT - the single most depressing (and alarming) thing for ME is that for someone who is as intelligent as he claims to be (and I believe he is intelligent and bright) - why / how can he be so racially ignorant?

How can someone as well-traveled and in the public spotlight as he has been for what? 50 years or so - be racially ignorant?

This man is close friends with Oprah...has been in a Bobby Brown video (LOL - didn't believe it at first but it's true and I don't think it's photoshopped or anything).

He's been ALL OVER THE WORLD....talked to LOTS of people - even before his presidency.

I am certain that if me or my family were to ever meet him he'd come across as a decent man.

So why these comments? Why the GOP SILENCE?

When I was in the Navy good order and discipline were the rules of the day. If you said the stuff that Pres. Trump has said you'd be pulled aside, counseled, and then monitored for any regressions.

Such comments would raise alarms that would get your peers / shipmates upset, and you would get reported.

If you STILL didn't get your act right then you'd be processed out of the Navy - after being counseled by The Chief's Mess and THEN sent to Captain's Mast....

Speaking of which - I served with some Native Haitians and Africans while in the NAVY. They were smart, hardworking, and CONTRIBUTED to their Nation and Country. They made the Navy STRONGER.

I even roomed for several years with one who is a Christian. Former Navy, from Haiti. Smart man, hardworking, kept his nose clean, family man. He had a funny (but rich) accent and LOVED to eat...

NOT someone I'd recommend keeping out of my country.

While on the cusp of Martin Luther King's Birthday I'd pray that Pres. Trump finds his way and starts to understand that his comments hurt and that he is making the Nation weaker.

So far he is NOT bringing this country TOGETHER - as he PROMISED.
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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #145 on: January 13, 2018, 04:24:28 AM »

Online Roy H.

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Let's stay civil and on subject. This thread isn't about what Obama did or the Clinton Foundation.
I appreciate this comment, but it's inevitable. Does anyone actually know why there always ends up being efforts to highlight perceived double standards or hypocrisy?

I thinks it’s natural when somebody expresses outrage, yet didn’t under similar circumstances previously.  It’s legit to wonder if they’re truly outraged, or whether they’re exaggerating to score political points.

Natural, maybe, but it needs to be called for what it is in a political debate: totally irrelevant. It's literally a logical fallacy in the most formal sense- "tu quoque". Now popularly know as "whataboutism". Of course, these days I'm an elitist if I get too debate-team-y on the Internet.

Both sides do it, of course, but I find special irony when the personal responsibility advocates make it a go-to move. God forbid the POTUS be judged on his own merits.

We teach kids on the playground that "he started it" or "he did it first" aren't valid excuses, and yet, it's in practically everything political thread like clockwork. Sigh.

It’s more a recognition that the person you’re debating has no principles.  If somebody can’t say “yes, _______ was wrong when he did something similar”, then s/he is part of the problem. Whataboutism isn’t used to excuse behavior, it’s to show people what giant, shallow hypocrites they are. Pointing out hypocrisy and a lack of principled argument seems to have a place in a debate.
Wow, that is wrong and insulting on so many levels. So people who don't agree with your view of the situation have no principles? They have to agree your way is the right way or else they will be labeled wrong, hypocrites and without principles? There just us no other way to look at the situation

What Trump did was clearly different than what Obama did. Obama called the situation in Libya because of the British handling of the situation a crapshow. It was a description of the event and goings on in Libya created by the UK. That word didn't describe the country itself or the people who are Libyans. Instead it was a rebuke to the UK government in the handling of the Libya situation.

Trump, after calling Mexican thieves and rapists, after calling Neo-Nazus fine people, after twice having an immigration ban halted because it targteed a certain ethnicity and religion, then goes and calls African, almost completely black countries crapholes and wants Haitians out of here, while at the same time wanting almostly completely white Norwegians to emmigrate here.

If this was an out of the blue mistake, an out of character slip....no big deal. He apologizes for a slip of his lip and all is well. But this is a clear pattern of racist comments and words used pretty consistently by this president. So yeah, there is reason to be outraged.

And if the hypocrisy was a one-time thing I’d accept that people might have evolved their opinion, or been unaware of previous similar instances. But, the same serial hypocrites on both sides of the aisle always seem to find a way to support “their guy” while distinguishing their righteous outrage toward the “other guy”.

I won’t derail the thread by listing various instances of hypocrisy, but they’re ever-present. When they’re brought up, you can always rely on dedicated partisans to regurgitate talking points that boil down to “my party is good, their party is bad”.

So, yeah: either calling another country a profane name is unpresidential, beneath the office, and wantonly dangerous, or it’s not.  It’s not agreeing with my point of view, it’s remaining internally consistent with some underlying principle other than “I think how everyone else in my Party thinks”.   If you think Trump used vulgar, careless language that he should have known would become public, then hold Obama to the same standard.  But don’t split hairs regarding the greater acceptability of “show” versus “holes”.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 04:41:32 AM by Roy H. »


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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #146 on: January 13, 2018, 05:40:18 AM »

Offline byennie

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TL;DR; whataboutism is weak sauce, shows a lack of real argument, and isn't the same as simply pointing out hypocrisy on occasion.

Hypocrisy should always be pointed out.

No, absolutely not. Sometimes it's just deflecting and making it impossible to discuss the issue at hand and doesn't need to be brought up. Is hypocrisy justice warrior a term yet?
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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #147 on: January 13, 2018, 05:46:06 AM »

Online Roy H.

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TL;DR; whataboutism is weak sauce, shows a lack of real argument, and isn't the same as simply pointing out hypocrisy on occasion.

Hypocrisy should always be pointed out.

No, absolutely not. Sometimes it's just deflecting and making it impossible to discuss the issue at hand and doesn't need to be brought up. Is hypocrisy justice warrior a term yet?

I think it’s impossible to discuss any issue at hand if one’s perspective is partisan, rather than principled.  One of the ways you determine that is examining the consistency of internal viewpoints.

Any suggestion that pointing out inconsistent positions is ineffective or off-limits in debate is silly. 
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 05:55:01 AM by Roy H. »


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Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #148 on: January 13, 2018, 06:27:05 AM »

Offline Celtics4ever

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Quote
So why these comments? Why the GOP SILENCE?

They have not been silent, your news must be pretty biased not to report the following.

Quote
Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, of Utah, said in response to the vulgar remark, "I look forward to getting a more detailed explanation regarding the President's comments. Part of what makes America so special is that we welcome the best and brightest in the world, regardless of their country of origin."

Quote
Speaker Paul Ryan on Friday afternoon broke his silence and condemned President Trump's remark about "sh*thole countries" from a day earlier.

The Wisconsin Republican was asked about the remark during a Q&A event at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He said that the first thing that came to mind is it's "very unfortunate" and "unhelpful."

"I thought about my own family," he said, describing his Irish immigrant relatives who came to the U.S. on what he said were called "coffin ships" and began working the railroads. Eventually, he said, they opened a farm in Wisconsin after they raised enough money.

"It's a beautiful story of America," he said. "I see this as a thing to celebrate and I think it's a big part of our strength."

Quote
“Following comments by the president, I said my piece directly to him yesterday,” Mr. Graham said. “The president and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel. I’ve always believed that America is an idea, not defined by its people but by its ideals.”

http://time.com/5100217/mia-love-donald-trump-****hole-remark/

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/12/577571516/republicans-join-in-condemning-trumps-use-of-expletive-to-describe-africa

https://www.cnn.com/2018/01/11/politics/congress-reaction-trump-****hole-countries/index.html

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/paul-ryan-calls-trumps-****hole-comment-very-unfortunate-and-unhelpful/

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/us/politics/trump-immigration-congress.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/us/politics/trump-immigration-congress.html

Quote
   
Trump's 's---hole' remark sparks bipartisan backlash
© Getty Images
President Trump sparked bipartisan backlash on Thursday evening following reports that he referred to Haiti and African nations as "****hole countries" during a heated Oval Office meeting with lawmakers to discuss immigration.
 
Trump reportedly grew frustrated with restoring protections for immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti and African nations as part of an immigration deal and suggested the U.S. instead bring in more immigrants from countries such as Norway, the prime minister of which he met Wednesday.
 
“Why are we having all these people from ****hole countries come here?” Trump said, according to The Washington Post, which first reported his comments.
 
Democrats slammed the comments as racist, while multiple GOP lawmakers called on Trump to clarify his remarks after the White House did not deny the reported comments.
 
Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah), the nation's first Haitian-American representative, said the president's remarks were "unkind, divisive, elitist, and fly in the face of our nation’s values."
 
"This behavior is unacceptable from the leader of our nation," Love said in a statement. "My parents came from one of those countries but proudly took an oath of allegiance to the United States and took on the responsibilities of everything that being a citizen comes with."
 
Other Republicans, such as Sen. Orrin Hatch (Utah), called for a "detailed explanation" of Trump's comments, while Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) called them "disappointing."
 
"I would not talk about nations like this, because I believe the people of those countries are made in the image of God and have worth and human dignity," Lankford said in a statement.
 
"Part of what makes America so special is that we welcome the best and brightest in the world, regardless of their country of origin," Hatch said in his statement.
Under no circumstances is it acceptable to degrade, denigrate, or dehumanize #TPS immigrants. The White House must immediately explain the situation and leave no doubt regarding what was said and in what context.

— Rep. Carlos Curbelo (@RepCurbelo) January 11, 2018
The president calling #Haiti a "****hole country" ignores the contributions thousands of Haitians have made to our #SoFla community and nation. Language like that shouldn't be heard in locker rooms and it shouldn't be heard in the White House

— Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (@RosLehtinen) January 11, 2018
Democrats were less forgiving with their criticism and blasted Republicans for not going further to rebuke the White House.

"This is racism, plain and simple, and we need to call it that. My Republican colleagues need to call it that too," Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.) tweeted.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) tweeted that Trump's comments "smack of blatant racism — odious and insidious racism masquerading poorly as immigration policy. He does not speak for me as an American." He echoed his comments on MSNBC.

America is better than this and our president should be too. https://t.co/RIhRpMd7If

— Senator Bob Casey (@SenBobCasey) January 11, 2018
I honestly cannot imagine the pain that those Oval Office comments are causing for immigrants and people of color everywhere. That does not represent who we are as a country. I’m sorry, and we are fighting for you.

— Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) January 11, 2018
It appears as if the color of money isn’t the only color @realDonaldTrump cares about. These are words of hate and we must condemn them on many sides.https://t.co/SUY7Mr3TEe

— Ed Markey (@SenMarkey) January 11, 2018
The White House issued a statement Thursday in response to the Post's story and did not deny Trump's use of the term "****hole" to describe Haiti and African nations.

The president has been quoted in the past making disparaging comments about Haitian and Nigerian immigrants, comments that were swiftly denied and called "outrageous" by White House officials.

“Certain Washington politicians choose to fight for foreign countries, but President Trump will always fight for the American people,” White House spokesman Raj Shah said Thursday.

Trump's comments came amid a push for a bipartisan deal on immigration as lawmakers rush to meet a Jan. 19 deadline to fund the government.

A bipartisan group of senators said Thursday they had clinched a deal to provide protections to young immigrants known as Dreamers, but faced pushback from Trump and GOP leadership.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said during a press briefing later in the day, "There has not been a deal reached yet. However, we still think we can get there and we are very focused on trying to make sure that happens."

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/368636-lawmakers-rail-against-trump-after-s-hole-comment

Looks like someone only has one biased newsource.  Of CNN's headline reads:

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The remarkable Republican underreaction on 's---hole'

Do yourself a service and get multiple sources of news.  I would suggest it almost everyone.  News isn't news like it used to be, it is partisan be it Fox, OAN or CNN, MSNBC.

Re: Trump uses expletive to describe countries that we have immigrants from
« Reply #149 on: January 13, 2018, 07:07:19 AM »

Offline GreenFaith1819

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So why these comments? Why the GOP SILENCE?

They have not been silent, your news must be pretty biased not to report the following.

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Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, of Utah, said in response to the vulgar remark, "I look forward to getting a more detailed explanation regarding the President's comments. Part of what makes America so special is that we welcome the best and brightest in the world, regardless of their country of origin."

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Speaker Paul Ryan on Friday afternoon broke his silence and condemned President Trump's remark about "sh*thole countries" from a day earlier.

The Wisconsin Republican was asked about the remark during a Q&A event at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He said that the first thing that came to mind is it's "very unfortunate" and "unhelpful."

"I thought about my own family," he said, describing his Irish immigrant relatives who came to the U.S. on what he said were called "coffin ships" and began working the railroads. Eventually, he said, they opened a farm in Wisconsin after they raised enough money.

"It's a beautiful story of America," he said. "I see this as a thing to celebrate and I think it's a big part of our strength."

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“Following comments by the president, I said my piece directly to him yesterday,” Mr. Graham said. “The president and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel. I’ve always believed that America is an idea, not defined by its people but by its ideals.”

http://time.com/5100217/mia-love-donald-trump-****hole-remark/

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/12/577571516/republicans-join-in-condemning-trumps-use-of-expletive-to-describe-africa

https://www.cnn.com/2018/01/11/politics/congress-reaction-trump-****hole-countries/index.html

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/paul-ryan-calls-trumps-****hole-comment-very-unfortunate-and-unhelpful/

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/us/politics/trump-immigration-congress.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/12/us/politics/trump-immigration-congress.html

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Trump's 's---hole' remark sparks bipartisan backlash
© Getty Images
President Trump sparked bipartisan backlash on Thursday evening following reports that he referred to Haiti and African nations as "****hole countries" during a heated Oval Office meeting with lawmakers to discuss immigration.
 
Trump reportedly grew frustrated with restoring protections for immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti and African nations as part of an immigration deal and suggested the U.S. instead bring in more immigrants from countries such as Norway, the prime minister of which he met Wednesday.
 
“Why are we having all these people from ****hole countries come here?” Trump said, according to The Washington Post, which first reported his comments.
 
Democrats slammed the comments as racist, while multiple GOP lawmakers called on Trump to clarify his remarks after the White House did not deny the reported comments.
 
Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah), the nation's first Haitian-American representative, said the president's remarks were "unkind, divisive, elitist, and fly in the face of our nation’s values."
 
"This behavior is unacceptable from the leader of our nation," Love said in a statement. "My parents came from one of those countries but proudly took an oath of allegiance to the United States and took on the responsibilities of everything that being a citizen comes with."
 
Other Republicans, such as Sen. Orrin Hatch (Utah), called for a "detailed explanation" of Trump's comments, while Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) called them "disappointing."
 
"I would not talk about nations like this, because I believe the people of those countries are made in the image of God and have worth and human dignity," Lankford said in a statement.
 
"Part of what makes America so special is that we welcome the best and brightest in the world, regardless of their country of origin," Hatch said in his statement.
Under no circumstances is it acceptable to degrade, denigrate, or dehumanize #TPS immigrants. The White House must immediately explain the situation and leave no doubt regarding what was said and in what context.

— Rep. Carlos Curbelo (@RepCurbelo) January 11, 2018
The president calling #Haiti a "****hole country" ignores the contributions thousands of Haitians have made to our #SoFla community and nation. Language like that shouldn't be heard in locker rooms and it shouldn't be heard in the White House

— Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (@RosLehtinen) January 11, 2018
Democrats were less forgiving with their criticism and blasted Republicans for not going further to rebuke the White House.

"This is racism, plain and simple, and we need to call it that. My Republican colleagues need to call it that too," Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.) tweeted.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) tweeted that Trump's comments "smack of blatant racism — odious and insidious racism masquerading poorly as immigration policy. He does not speak for me as an American." He echoed his comments on MSNBC.

America is better than this and our president should be too. https://t.co/RIhRpMd7If

— Senator Bob Casey (@SenBobCasey) January 11, 2018
I honestly cannot imagine the pain that those Oval Office comments are causing for immigrants and people of color everywhere. That does not represent who we are as a country. I’m sorry, and we are fighting for you.

— Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) January 11, 2018
It appears as if the color of money isn’t the only color @realDonaldTrump cares about. These are words of hate and we must condemn them on many sides.https://t.co/SUY7Mr3TEe

— Ed Markey (@SenMarkey) January 11, 2018
The White House issued a statement Thursday in response to the Post's story and did not deny Trump's use of the term "****hole" to describe Haiti and African nations.

The president has been quoted in the past making disparaging comments about Haitian and Nigerian immigrants, comments that were swiftly denied and called "outrageous" by White House officials.

“Certain Washington politicians choose to fight for foreign countries, but President Trump will always fight for the American people,” White House spokesman Raj Shah said Thursday.

Trump's comments came amid a push for a bipartisan deal on immigration as lawmakers rush to meet a Jan. 19 deadline to fund the government.

A bipartisan group of senators said Thursday they had clinched a deal to provide protections to young immigrants known as Dreamers, but faced pushback from Trump and GOP leadership.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said during a press briefing later in the day, "There has not been a deal reached yet. However, we still think we can get there and we are very focused on trying to make sure that happens."

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/368636-lawmakers-rail-against-trump-after-s-hole-comment

Looks like someone only has one biased newsource.  Of CNN's headline reads:

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The remarkable Republican underreaction on 's---hole'

Do yourself a service and get multiple sources of news.  I would suggest it almost everyone.  News isn't news like it used to be, it is partisan be it Fox, OAN or CNN, MSNBC.

Good - thanks for posting.

So, why does he continue to make comments like this, Celticsforever?

YOU are former Military.

Why does President Trump continue to embolden the White Supremacists with these comments?

When "I" served - such comments would be categorized as "Conduct unbecoming an Officer."

And he "IS" an Officer - The Commander in Chief.
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