Author Topic: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health  (Read 3117 times)

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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #45 on: April 20, 2017, 05:28:17 PM »

Offline Ilikesports17

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Because basketball is a physical sport so ya gotta get physical with each other, and second, it's a professional league and no excuses can be made for losing games.

Sorry. Wish emotional health could be reevaluated but it won't happen.

Actually, the game is just as mental as it is physical, see what I mean about the lack of appreciation of emotional health issues? This is society as a whole, not limited to sports at all. No one has really bothered to ask how these players are emotionally? If it had been physical injuries we would have update on their health, MRI, X-Rays etc. But because this is mental, it somehow does not get the same attention. Society as a whole has to change attitudes towards mental health issues.
do you really want updates on the mental and emotional health of professional athletes?

I dont and I imagine Isaiah Thomas doesnt want that either.

Brad has already made it clear that Isaiah could have chosen to miss those games if he was not ready to go.

Isn't that part of what Twitter is for?
yeah, but I dont want the league to mandate emotional and mental health updates. Seems an invasion of privacy to me.
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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #46 on: April 20, 2017, 05:29:43 PM »

Online Roy H.

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.
No, that's not what the OP said at all. Trying reading things before you respond to them.

It isn't? It certainly seems to be.

Quote
Assume that a day before the first game of the playoffs a team suffers some kind of catastrophe that causes a devastating physical injury to its best players, and physical injury to all the other members of the team including the coach.

In this situation, there is no question they all will seek and get medical treatment, some will even be held out of the game because of their disability. Heck, the game could even be called off if enough of them were found physical unfit to play.

Why isnt the same standard applied to emotional injury? Why is that team expected to suck it up if the injury is mental? If the injury is emotional do they even get to seek medical intervention?

Of all body parts and systems, the human mind is probably still the most difficult to understand. Is it a mere coincidence that an emotionally traumatized team responds uncharacteristically after the trauma? If it had been physical injuries would their reduced productivity be more understandable, more accepted maybe?

Think about it?


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #47 on: April 20, 2017, 05:32:23 PM »

Offline PhoSita

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
I wouldn't want a surgeon doing an unusually difficult surgery if he spent the last few days with one of his closest friends grieving their loss and not focused on exactly what he is doing.

I wouldn't want you representing me in court in the biggest trial of your entire life if your best friends sister just died and you spent the last three days trying to make him feel better, and didn't have your normal amount of time to prepare for the trial.

Normal day to day sure people can be expected to juggle this but when you are about to have the biggest moments of your careers I bet you would feel unprepared if you spent the final few days leading up to it grieving with a close friend.


The thing is, if Roy were your attorney that trial date would have been set months ago and he might be the only attorney on your case. If that were the situation, he'd have to do his best to represent you even if he wasn't feeling at his best.

As in sports, you don't get to beg the court for a new trial date because your best friend is grieving.

Roy would be expected to do the best job he could representing you even so. That's just part of being an attorney. You have a duty to represent your clients.
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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #48 on: April 20, 2017, 05:34:12 PM »

Offline Androslav

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
It's not mental fragility, it's being a human being. What you're describing is a team of sociopaths.

Lol. Having control of one's emotions now makes somebody a sociopath?

We really are becoming a society of special snowflakes, where any adversity is seen as something to protest and withdraw from, rather than to overcome.
I think what you are describing is empathy and emotion being disregarded and shown as unacceptable, the way I see it, just for your (and other fans) personal joy of Celtic playoff win. That seems morally deficient and unacceptable to me within this context. Emotion is one of the core fabrics of us and our beloved players, and if we love them, as we often proudly say, we must accept it.
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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #49 on: April 20, 2017, 05:35:00 PM »

Offline Ogaju

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.

AND not all lawyers handle this well as the level of substance abuse in the profession suggests.

Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.

Actually the emotional stress inherent in firefighting gives firefighters very liberal presumptions in obtaining stress related disability, and proper mental health counseling is an integral part of that profession. I have seen an apparently stoic man crumble under the stress of his job which was EMT type work.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #50 on: April 20, 2017, 05:37:57 PM »

Offline Ogaju

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.

No need to misrepresent the OP. The point is emotional trauma is often overlooked and avoided. You prove the point well.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #51 on: April 20, 2017, 05:41:12 PM »

Offline Ogaju

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
I wouldn't want a surgeon doing an unusually difficult surgery if he spent the last few days with one of his closest friends grieving their loss and not focused on exactly what he is doing.

I wouldn't want you representing me in court in the biggest trial of your entire life if your best friends sister just died and you spent the last three days trying to make him feel better, and didn't have your normal amount of time to prepare for the trial.

Normal day to day sure people can be expected to juggle this but when you are about to have the biggest moments of your careers I bet you would feel unprepared if you spent the final few days leading up to it grieving with a close friend.


The thing is, if Roy were your attorney that trial date would have been set months ago and he might be the only attorney on your case. If that were the situation, he'd have to do his best to represent you even if he wasn't feeling at his best.

As in sports, you don't get to beg the court for a new trial date because your best friend is grieving.

Roy would be expected to do the best job he could representing you even so. That's just part of being an attorney. You have a duty to represent your clients.

Not true attys get cases continued all the time.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #52 on: April 20, 2017, 05:43:11 PM »

Offline mctyson

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Assume that a day before the first game of the playoffs a team suffers some kind of catastrophe that causes a devastating physical injury to its best players, and physical injury to all the other members of the team including the coach.

In this situation, there is no question they all will seek and get medical treatment, some will even be held out of the game because of their disability. Heck, the game could even be called off if enough of them were found physical unfit to play.

Why isnt the same standard applied to emotional injury? Why is that team expected to suck it up if the injury is mental? If the injury is emotional do they even get to seek medical intervention?

Of all body parts and systems, the human mind is probably still the most difficult to understand. Is it a mere coincidence that an emotionally traumatized team responds uncharacteristically after the trauma? If it had been physical injuries would their reduced productivity be more understandable, more accepted maybe?

Think about it?

This whole premise lacks really any amount of scientific credibility, but even if it did, then it is on the Coach to step in and say "you aren't playing."  Brad left it up to IT.  He played.  They lost.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #53 on: April 20, 2017, 05:46:49 PM »

Online Roy H.

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
I wouldn't want a surgeon doing an unusually difficult surgery if he spent the last few days with one of his closest friends grieving their loss and not focused on exactly what he is doing.

I wouldn't want you representing me in court in the biggest trial of your entire life if your best friends sister just died and you spent the last three days trying to make him feel better, and didn't have your normal amount of time to prepare for the trial.

Normal day to day sure people can be expected to juggle this but when you are about to have the biggest moments of your careers I bet you would feel unprepared if you spent the final few days leading up to it grieving with a close friend.


The thing is, if Roy were your attorney that trial date would have been set months ago and he might be the only attorney on your case. If that were the situation, he'd have to do his best to represent you even if he wasn't feeling at his best.

As in sports, you don't get to beg the court for a new trial date because your best friend is grieving.

Roy would be expected to do the best job he could representing you even so. That's just part of being an attorney. You have a duty to represent your clients.

Not true attys get cases continued all the time.

True, but not once a trial date is set. Some jurisdictions, like NJ, require extraordinary circumstances to continue a trial date. Feeling upset because a co-workers sister passed away isn't going to pass muster.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #54 on: April 20, 2017, 05:49:56 PM »

Online Roy H.

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.

No need to misrepresent the OP. The point is emotional trauma is often overlooked and avoided. You prove the point well.

I quoted your post. It's exactly what you said.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #55 on: April 20, 2017, 06:00:37 PM »

Offline Big333223

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.

No need to misrepresent the OP. The point is emotional trauma is often overlooked and avoided. You prove the point well.

I quoted your post. It's exactly what you said.
Roy, I read what he wrote and you are clearly misrepresenting his words. Or you just don't understand them. Either way, you've proven his point.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #56 on: April 20, 2017, 06:05:45 PM »

Online Roy H.

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.

No need to misrepresent the OP. The point is emotional trauma is often overlooked and avoided. You prove the point well.

I quoted your post. It's exactly what you said.
Roy, I read what he wrote and you are clearly misrepresenting his words. Or you just don't understand them. Either way, you've proven his point.

His point that, if this team is extraordinarily weak-minded minded, fans shouldn't criticize that?

But seriously, what part of this is a misrepresentation?

Quote
According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #57 on: April 20, 2017, 06:48:26 PM »

Offline Ilikesports17

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.

No need to misrepresent the OP. The point is emotional trauma is often overlooked and avoided. You prove the point well.

I quoted your post. It's exactly what you said.
Roy, I read what he wrote and you are clearly misrepresenting his words. Or you just don't understand them. Either way, you've proven his point.

His point that, if this team is extraordinarily weak-minded minded, fans shouldn't criticize that?

But seriously, what part of this is a misrepresentation?

Quote
According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.
I agree with Roy.

If this team has players mentally weak enough that this cripples them (aside from IT) then we should move on from them. To look at it like Ogaju does, I would say they are major injury risks.
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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #58 on: April 20, 2017, 06:48:43 PM »

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.

No need to misrepresent the OP. The point is emotional trauma is often overlooked and avoided. You prove the point well.

I quoted your post. It's exactly what you said.
Roy, I read what he wrote and you are clearly misrepresenting his words. Or you just don't understand them. Either way, you've proven his point.

His point that, if this team is extraordinarily weak-minded minded, fans shouldn't criticize that?

But seriously, what part of this is a misrepresentation?

Quote
According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

In a world where we accept that stress is a constant factor, the hope is that we manage the stress, or even use it as motivation to over-achieve -- this is the premise behind "clutch" performances.   I think the OPs point is that a team that experiences a highly stressful event might experience (in some respect) a traumatic response to the event -- causing unexpected emotional phenomena and quite possibly subconscious impact.  I do believe that a basketball team does consist of "co-workers" (referring back to Roy's comment on page of this thread), but really atypical co-workers, possibly could be considered something in between a "family" and typical co-workers in response to a teammate's tragedy.

I understand that if there is a counter-productive (counter to basketball success) emotional response by the team -- perhaps impacting focus and sustained energy, that this is not what you would hope for from a professional team.  However, these are human beings and it certainly is plausible that the poor performances in games 1 and 2 are attributable in part to the after-effects of the tragedy.  You can say this is weak-mindedness I guess, but it's hard to know how anyone would react in similar circumstances as these circumstances are difficult to replicate. 

In an event that did not occur in-season (or playoffs) but I think absolutely had residual traumatic impact on a bona-fide championship team -- ask Larry Bird and Kevin McHale if they think that Len Bias' death had an lingering emotional impact on the team's performance in 1987.  The team did make it to the Finals but I think there was a pall over the season (and perhaps beyond) that had an emotional impact.  The Big 3 never won again.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #59 on: April 20, 2017, 07:21:36 PM »

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In an event that did not occur in-season (or playoffs) but I think absolutely had residual traumatic impact on a bona-fide championship team -- ask Larry Bird and Kevin McHale if they think that Len Bias' death had an lingering emotional impact on the team's performance in 1987.  The team did make it to the Finals but I think there was a pall over the season (and perhaps beyond) that had an emotional impact.  The Big 3 never won again.

I've always looked at the loss in '87 being due to injuries (physical ones, not mental). Walton became ineffective overnight, McHale broke his foot, and Parish and Ainge were banged up. Plus, that was a great Lakers team.

Bias' death was traumatic, but I don't think it had much to do with the Celtics losing in the Finals.


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