Author Topic: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health  (Read 2499 times)

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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #30 on: April 20, 2017, 12:15:36 PM »

Online Roy H.

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This attitude pervades our entire system, how can you even address an issue when society does not believe there is one. Since there is no issue, everyone thinks they are experts. Has there even been an attempt to have a mental health professional intervene with the team, or is the therapy limited to 'suck it up' posts on the internet?

Danny has tried to eliminate mentally weak individuals through his use of brain typing. My guess is that he doesn't want players who are debilitated by emotional moments.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2017, 12:26:48 PM »

Offline Big333223

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Trying to alibi away poor performance by this club on Thomas' tragedy is a blatant example of a straw man, an attempt to deny the reality that we are a reliable second scorer and a rebounder/rim protecter away from actually being good, and immune to being exposed as we have been by the Bulls.

Were there any truth to this silliness, which there isn't a shred, all the exercise would prove is who should be eliminated - immediately - from this roster as too weak to aid in building a champion.
1. That's not what a straw man is.

2. I don't think anyone is trying to excuse the Celtics' performance over these first two games, but looking for reasons for why they've played this poorly. It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2017, 12:37:32 PM »

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2017, 12:53:03 PM »

Offline adam8

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
I wouldn't want a surgeon doing an unusually difficult surgery if he spent the last few days with one of his closest friends grieving their loss and not focused on exactly what he is doing.

I wouldn't want you representing me in court in the biggest trial of your entire life if your best friends sister just died and you spent the last three days trying to make him feel better, and didn't have your normal amount of time to prepare for the trial.

Normal day to day sure people can be expected to juggle this but when you are about to have the biggest moments of your careers I bet you would feel unprepared if you spent the final few days leading up to it grieving with a close friend.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #34 on: April 20, 2017, 01:03:12 PM »

Online Ogaju

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.

AND not all lawyers handle this well as the level of substance abuse in the profession suggests.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 01:47:08 PM by Ogaju »

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #35 on: April 20, 2017, 01:08:06 PM »

Offline kraidstar

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I think there has been an under-appreciation of everything we have done in the past 4 years, just because the last 4 days didn't go the way we hoped. That shows the lack of character from the loudest CB fanbase and not the lack of professionalism by the club employees.

(Except Smart, who was rightfully fined.)

TP.

Most fanbases would be happy to be in our position, a lot of teams can't even make the playoffs after spending all their picks on rentals (see the Nets).

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #36 on: April 20, 2017, 04:38:34 PM »

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.

AND not all lawyers handle this well as the level of substance abuse in the profession suggests.

Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #37 on: April 20, 2017, 05:01:44 PM »

Offline Big333223

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #38 on: April 20, 2017, 05:04:05 PM »

Offline Big333223

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
It's not mental fragility, it's being a human being. What you're describing is a team of sociopaths.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #39 on: April 20, 2017, 05:08:39 PM »

Online Roy H.

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #40 on: April 20, 2017, 05:13:24 PM »

Offline Big333223

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #41 on: April 20, 2017, 05:15:07 PM »

Online Roy H.

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
It's not mental fragility, it's being a human being. What you're describing is a team of sociopaths.

Lol. Having control of one's emotions now makes somebody a sociopath?

We really are becoming a society of special snowflakes, where any adversity is seen as something to protest and withdraw from, rather than to overcome.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #42 on: April 20, 2017, 05:20:18 PM »

Online Roy H.

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.


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Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #43 on: April 20, 2017, 05:21:31 PM »

Offline Big333223

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It's not mental fragility it's about how much outside life affects the game and how little we take that into account.

Which is mental fragility.

There's more to basketball than physical talent. Pros need to deal with mental pressure.

Would you want a surgeon operating on you who couldn't separate his job from the outside world of his friends / co-workers? There's a reason that not every student who can adequately dissect a cadaver becomes a surgeon.

Certain jobs require people to compartmentalize their emotions to a reasonable extent.
It's not mental fragility, it's being a human being. What you're describing is a team of sociopaths.

Lol. Having control of one's emotions now makes somebody a sociopath?

We really are becoming a society of special snowflakes, where any adversity is seen as something to protest and withdraw from, rather than to overcome.
Again, who on the Celtics team would you say hasn't had control of their emotions in the last two games?

Also, let it be known that you don't seem to be able to have this conversation without ad hominem attacks. Classy.

Re: there is still an under-appreciation of emotional health
« Reply #44 on: April 20, 2017, 05:23:07 PM »

Offline Big333223

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Sure. If somebody can't adequately control their emotions, they'll probably be unsuccessful at their job or flame out in some other way.

Soldiers, police, firefighters, surgeons, EMTs, etc. all deal with emotional trauma every day, and they do their jobs well. Yet we somehow excuse basketball players from maintaining focus and energy for 48 minutes per night?

That's warped to me. If this theory is true (it isn't) we've got to have the softest, most mentally fragile team in the history of Boston sports.
This whole post is completely divorced from reality.

Everyone on the Celtics has controlled their emotions just fine (except for Smart, flipping off the fan). It's not about controlling emotions, it's about how real life off the court affects players and how little time we spent considering that.

In most other professions, IT would not have come in for work. If he were a surgeon or a lawyer or a cop he'd be on leave. And really, comparing these guys who play a game for a living to firefighters and EMTs is ridiculous.

Looking over this thread and seeing just how quickly "having emotions" became a moral failing for some seems to have proven the OP's point.

Having emotions isn't a problem.

Not being able to control emotions is.

Everyone not named IT has no excuse to underperform. Dion Waiters and Dwayne Wade both had relatives murdered last year. Did their teams collapse around them out of empathy?
Who on this Celtics team hasn't controlled their emotions? Because the only guy I would level that criticism at is Marcus (flipping off the fan), who has also been one of the team's better players these two games. So I don't know who you're talking about.

According to the OP, the entire team is underperforming due to undergoing emotional trauma, akin to every player suffering a serious physical injury.

If that's true (I don't think it is), then the team is extraordinarily mentally fragile.
No, that's not what the OP said at all. Trying reading things before you respond to them.