Author Topic: All Things Philadelphia 76ers (merged Sixers threads)  (Read 59246 times)

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Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #60 on: January 08, 2017, 04:55:32 PM »

Offline LarBrd33

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I mean, the enjoyment we've had watching a decent team over the past three seasons (and in future seasons) is worth something.  If both teams end up back in contention at the same time I definitely like our way better.

I agree.  Over the past 2 1/2 seasons the Celtics have won 73 more games than the 76ers.  For those who don't watch games that might not matter.  But for those of us that do, we've got to see some good basketball and competitive games.  I don't take that for granted.  I can tolerate one tanking season, but Philly's tank is going on half a decade now.  It's ridiculous.
I guess I have a different perspective and tolerance level since I'm a long distance fan.  I would have preferred tanking or at least not backing into the playoffs in 2014-15.  You have to get really lucky if you just tank one season.
We definitely set out to tank a second season in a row in 2014-15.  Read Ainge quotes at the time he was pretty transparent he preferred a top pick to a pointless playoff series.  We essentially traded every vet left on the roster that year.  We traded both Rondo and Jeff green.  We got rid of rotation players for picks.  That team was set up to tank as well as any GM can really set up a team to tank.

Two things happened:

#1. Ainge underestimated the genius of Brad Stevens.  He got young kids and former bench players  to overachieve. 

#2.  Ainge saw an opportunity to land Isaiah Thomas for a lowly 1st round pick and jumped at it despite the impact it might have on the tank job.  Too good of a player to pass up.

It worked out fine, but the team got predictably swept in the playoffs and Ainge tried and failed to give up 6 picks to move up and select Winslow in the draft.

Kinda just goes to show you... losing culture disappears as soon as teams start winning.   We were in the midst of a two year tank job when our tanking abruptly ended.  You will eventually see something similar happen with Philly when thinks suddenly start clicking.  Way too much young talent for it to not happen. 

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #61 on: January 08, 2017, 04:59:47 PM »

Offline LarBrd33

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If the following things are true:

1. Your enjoyment from watching a good but not Championship-level team is exactly 0

2. You are confident that the league won't change the rules mid-stream and screw you over

Then I agree that the optimal strategy is to trade everyone, draft players, trade every one of those players who won't be a superstar, draft more players, and repeat until you have a critical mass of superstars. 

Follow boom-bust cycles where you are the worst team in the league for 5~8 years, and then are hopefully really good for 5~8 years.
As good as Boston is right now, they aren't yet a true contender.  And while I truly hope that changes soon, it's not at all far fetched that we could see a scenario where teams like the timberwolves and 76ers become true contenders before we do.   This isn't a straight forward race.  A single superstar acquisition changes everything.  We should win 55 games this season.  Without a major addition, we might be a 50-55 win team for a while.   We've seen teams jump from 20 to 60 wins rapidly.   We could still get lapped.

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #62 on: January 08, 2017, 05:02:02 PM »

Online knuckleballer

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"a losing culture can be hard to break is a good argument if it weren't for examples of losing teams that became winners.   You recall what happened to the Wickes/Rowe Cs once 23 yo Larry Bird got here. Losing culture dies quickly when dominant players begin to dominate"

You just ruined your own argument. One big reason that the 1980 Celtics turned things around was that Wicks and Rowe and their attitudes were gone. Fitch and Larry took care of those problems in training camp.
its actually very true. Losing cultures disappear as soon as the stars hit their stride.  Happened with the cavs. Happened with Oklahoma. Happened with the clippers.  Etc.

Philly is set up majestically heading forward.  Last I checked, since both Boston and philly started tanking, those two teams have the same amount of playoff series wins.  That should change this season I assume, but I fully expect barring injury Philly to be in the playoffs and making noise within the next few years.   Their culture has already changed since the arrival of Embiid. That team and its fanbase is lit.  Only a matter of time before the minutes restrictions lift, their other franchise player returns and they figure out how to get some wins consistently.

To equate Philly tanking with our tanking is nonsense and done to inflame Celtic fans. Nice.

You are the worst prognosticator on this blog, so your predictions as to Philly's future carry as much weight as your predictions about the Nets: Zilch.
we both started tanking at the same time. It's a fact.  Philly traded their lone borderline star for Noel and saric. We traded two hall of famers for draft picks, another allstar for draft picks, another top player for draft picks... and our reward was Marcus smart. Their reward was Embiid. Boston then quickly became decent while philly kept collecting potential stars (okafor and Simmons).    It's been a few years and neither team has won a playoff series.  We should win one this year.  I suspect Philly will too in the next few years.

We had one really bad season, 13/14. Sixer played bad from 12/13 through 16/17. That's five years in a row. That's a fact, kid. Choose your words more carefully.
listen grandpappy, the only relevant fact you just brought up is that Philly was mediocre to bad for decades before they tanked that season. Boston was breaking up a contender and had significantly more assets to deal.   They traded away three all stars and Jeff green for assets.  Philly's only real asset was jrue holiday and they were actually missing picks when they started tanking.

Nonetheless, it's entirely accurate to say both teams started tanking the same season.   By definition, if you trade all your best players for picks - you're tanking... no matter what some arbitrary "rebuilding" designation you want to give it.  You really don't get any more quintessential "tanking" than trading away an entire contender and intentionally bottoming out with a bottom 3 record.   That marked the second time of Danny's tenure they intentionally tanked (they did it in 2007) and the third noteable tankjob of this franchise (1997).   Also, if you real any quotes from Ainge during the 2014 season, it's blatantly clear the team intended to bottom out that season as well, but Thomas fell into our lap, our young role players exceeded expectations and Brad Stevens coached them into the playoffs with a below .500 record.

It is what it is.  We are positioned as well as any team in the league heading forward thanks to our uncanny luck moving our hall of famers for future picks that now are conveying extremely high.   It's a great position to be in.  But it's notable that neither Philly or Boston have won a playoff series since they began their tank job.   Boston got mediocre quicker than Philly and now they are a top 10 team ... it looks like Philly will catch up within the next few years - which is remarkable considering they started with 1/6th the assets Boston did in 2013 when both teams intentionally tanked.

The Celtics were no longer a contender when they traded away Pierce, Garnett, and Terry.  They won 41 games that year and lost in the first round of the playoffs to the Knicks.  All 3 players were well past their primes.

You act as if the Celtics and 76ers have been in the same boat the past two seasons because neither won a playoff series, but that is absurd.  They Celtics averaged 44 wins per season while Philly averaged 14.  This year, the Celtics have 23 wins to their 10 wins.  Maybe, you don't care about that, but I think most people who watch games do.  And the coach and players on the team certainly do as well.

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #63 on: January 08, 2017, 05:03:05 PM »

Offline oldtype

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If the following things are true:

1. Your enjoyment from watching a good but not Championship-level team is exactly 0

2. You are confident that the league won't change the rules mid-stream and screw you over

Then I agree that the optimal strategy is to trade everyone, draft players, trade every one of those players who won't be a superstar, draft more players, and repeat until you have a critical mass of superstars. 

Follow boom-bust cycles where you are the worst team in the league for 5~8 years, and then are hopefully really good for 5~8 years.
As good as Boston is right now, they aren't yet a true contender.  And while I truly hope that changes soon, it's not at all far fetched that we could see a scenario where teams like the timberwolves and 76ers become true contenders before we do.   This isn't a straight forward race.  A single superstar acquisition changes everything.  We should win 55 games this season.  Without a major addition, we might be a 50-55 win team for a while.   We've seen teams jump from 20 to 60 wins rapidly.   We could still get lapped.

That part in bold is what you're trying to say, right?


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Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #64 on: January 08, 2017, 05:06:05 PM »

Offline Ilikesports17

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"a losing culture can be hard to break is a good argument if it weren't for examples of losing teams that became winners.   You recall what happened to the Wickes/Rowe Cs once 23 yo Larry Bird got here. Losing culture dies quickly when dominant players begin to dominate"

You just ruined your own argument. One big reason that the 1980 Celtics turned things around was that Wicks and Rowe and their attitudes were gone. Fitch and Larry took care of those problems in training camp.
its actually very true. Losing cultures disappear as soon as the stars hit their stride.  Happened with the cavs. Happened with Oklahoma. Happened with the clippers.  Etc.

Philly is set up majestically heading forward.  Last I checked, since both Boston and philly started tanking, those two teams have the same amount of playoff series wins.  That should change this season I assume, but I fully expect barring injury Philly to be in the playoffs and making noise within the next few years.   Their culture has already changed since the arrival of Embiid. That team and its fanbase is lit.  Only a matter of time before the minutes restrictions lift, their other franchise player returns and they figure out how to get some wins consistently.

To equate Philly tanking with our tanking is nonsense and done to inflame Celtic fans. Nice.

You are the worst prognosticator on this blog, so your predictions as to Philly's future carry as much weight as your predictions about the Nets: Zilch.
we both started tanking at the same time. It's a fact.  Philly traded their lone borderline star for Noel and saric. We traded two hall of famers for draft picks, another allstar for draft picks, another top player for draft picks... and our reward was Marcus smart. Their reward was Embiid. Boston then quickly became decent while philly kept collecting potential stars (okafor and Simmons).    It's been a few years and neither team has won a playoff series.  We should win one this year.  I suspect Philly will too in the next few years.

We had one really bad season, 13/14. Sixer played bad from 12/13 through 16/17. That's five years in a row. That's a fact, kid. Choose your words more carefully.
listen grandpappy, the only relevant fact you just brought up is that Philly was mediocre to bad for decades before they tanked that season. Boston was breaking up a contender and had significantly more assets to deal.   They traded away three all stars and Jeff green for assets.  Philly's only real asset was jrue holiday and they were actually missing picks when they started tanking.

Nonetheless, it's entirely accurate to say both teams started tanking the same season.   By definition, if you trade all your best players for picks - you're tanking... no matter what some arbitrary "rebuilding" designation you want to give it.  You really don't get any more quintessential "tanking" than trading away an entire contender and intentionally bottoming out with a bottom 3 record.   That marked the second time of Danny's tenure they intentionally tanked (they did it in 2007) and the third noteable tankjob of this franchise (1997).   Also, if you real any quotes from Ainge during the 2014 season, it's blatantly clear the team intended to bottom out that season as well, but Thomas fell into our lap, our young role players exceeded expectations and Brad Stevens coached them into the playoffs with a below .500 record.

It is what it is.  We are positioned as well as any team in the league heading forward thanks to our uncanny luck moving our hall of famers for future picks that now are conveying extremely high.   It's a great position to be in.  But it's notable that neither Philly or Boston have won a playoff series since they began their tank job.   Boston got mediocre quicker than Philly and now they are a top 10 team ... it looks like Philly will catch up within the next few years - which is remarkable considering they started with 1/6th the assets Boston did in 2013 when both teams intentionally tanked.
LB you have said before that the Celtics were not a contender in 11-12. If they werent a contender in 11-12 then they certainly werent breaking up a contender after 12-13 when Pierce and KG were a year older, Rondo had torn and ACL and Ray Allen was gone.

3 all-stars is a bit strong. They had 2 all-stars that season. an injured Rajon Rondo and a 36 year old KG who barely got in via fan-vote. The sixers on the other hand had 1 all-star. A 22 year old Jrue Holiday.

Boston was likely a top 10 team last season. Of teams losing in the first round we were tied for the second best record with Charlotte. Charlotte pushed Miami to 7, so you could say we were 11th, but I think its a bit unfair to say that because both Boston Charlotte and LA were all realistically better than the 44 win trail-blazers who only advanced due to injuries to Blake AND CP3.
Quote from: George W. Bush
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Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #65 on: January 08, 2017, 05:07:25 PM »

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If the following things are true:

1. Your enjoyment from watching a good but not Championship-level team is exactly 0

2. You are confident that the league won't change the rules mid-stream and screw you over

Then I agree that the optimal strategy is to trade everyone, draft players, trade every one of those players who won't be a superstar, draft more players, and repeat until you have a critical mass of superstars. 

Follow boom-bust cycles where you are the worst team in the league for 5~8 years, and then are hopefully really good for 5~8 years.
As good as Boston is right now, they aren't yet a true contender.  And while I truly hope that changes soon, it's not at all far fetched that we could see a scenario where teams like the timberwolves and 76ers become true contenders before we do.   This isn't a straight forward race.  A single superstar acquisition changes everything.  We should win 55 games this season.  Without a major addition, we might be a 50-55 win team for a while.   We've seen teams jump from 20 to 60 wins rapidly.   We could still get lapped.

That part in bold is what you're trying to say, right?


Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #66 on: January 08, 2017, 05:19:06 PM »

Offline Ilikesports17

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I mean, the enjoyment we've had watching a decent team over the past three seasons (and in future seasons) is worth something.  If both teams end up back in contention at the same time I definitely like our way better.

I agree.  Over the past 2 1/2 seasons the Celtics have won 73 more games than the 76ers.  For those who don't watch games that might not matter.  But for those of us that do, we've got to see some good basketball and competitive games.  I don't take that for granted.  I can tolerate one tanking season, but Philly's tank is going on half a decade now.  It's ridiculous.
I guess I have a different perspective and tolerance level since I'm a long distance fan.  I would have preferred tanking or at least not backing into the playoffs in 2014-15.  You have to get really lucky if you just tank one season.
We definitely set out to tank a second season in a row in 2014-15.  Read Ainge quotes at the time he was pretty transparent he preferred a top pick to a pointless playoff series.  We essentially traded every vet left on the roster that year.  We traded both Rondo and Jeff green.  We got rid of rotation players for picks.  That team was set up to tank as well as any GM can really set up a team to tank.

Two things happened:

#1. Ainge underestimated the genius of Brad Stevens.  He got young kids and former bench players  to overachieve. 

#2.  Ainge saw an opportunity to land Isaiah Thomas for a lowly 1st round pick and jumped at it despite the impact it might have on the tank job.  Too good of a player to pass up.

It worked out fine, but the team got predictably swept in the playoffs and Ainge tried and failed to give up 6 picks to move up and select Winslow in the draft.

Kinda just goes to show you... losing culture disappears as soon as teams start winning.   We were in the midst of a two year tank job when our tanking abruptly ended.  You will eventually see something similar happen with Philly when thinks suddenly start clicking.  Way too much young talent for it to not happen.
Those 2 things are two things Philly wouldnt have done. They were careful in their hiring of Bret Brown. They also made many opportunistic moves but I think Hinkie would have passed the IT deal by for the good of the tank.

On losing culture, I think people misread it. Losing culture doesnt mean you wont know how to win in close games or the playoffs or any of that nonsense. Losing culture can stunt development of players. I think Noel and Okafor have both seen stunted development due to the lack of a competitive environment. They havent been able to play important minutes or big games against high intensity opponents.

Each at one point was one of the top 5 or 6 big man prospects in the game and neither have come anything close to meeting that potential while the other elite big prospects have largely flourished.

A guy like Embiid has the talent level to flourish despite the poor environment, but really good prospects cant transcend their situations.
Quote from: George W. Bush
Too often, we judge other groups by their worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions.

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #67 on: January 08, 2017, 05:20:44 PM »

Offline oldtype

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I mean, the enjoyment we've had watching a decent team over the past three seasons (and in future seasons) is worth something.  If both teams end up back in contention at the same time I definitely like our way better.

I agree.  Over the past 2 1/2 seasons the Celtics have won 73 more games than the 76ers.  For those who don't watch games that might not matter.  But for those of us that do, we've got to see some good basketball and competitive games.  I don't take that for granted.  I can tolerate one tanking season, but Philly's tank is going on half a decade now.  It's ridiculous.
I guess I have a different perspective and tolerance level since I'm a long distance fan.  I would have preferred tanking or at least not backing into the playoffs in 2014-15.  You have to get really lucky if you just tank one season.
We definitely set out to tank a second season in a row in 2014-15.  Read Ainge quotes at the time he was pretty transparent he preferred a top pick to a pointless playoff series.  We essentially traded every vet left on the roster that year.  We traded both Rondo and Jeff green.  We got rid of rotation players for picks.  That team was set up to tank as well as any GM can really set up a team to tank.

Two things happened:

#1. Ainge underestimated the genius of Brad Stevens.  He got young kids and former bench players  to overachieve. 

#2.  Ainge saw an opportunity to land Isaiah Thomas for a lowly 1st round pick and jumped at it despite the impact it might have on the tank job.  Too good of a player to pass up.

It worked out fine, but the team got predictably swept in the playoffs and Ainge tried and failed to give up 6 picks to move up and select Winslow in the draft.

Kinda just goes to show you... losing culture disappears as soon as teams start winning.   We were in the midst of a two year tank job when our tanking abruptly ended.  You will eventually see something similar happen with Philly when thinks suddenly start clicking.  Way too much young talent for it to not happen.
Those 2 things are two things Philly wouldnt have done. They were careful in their hiring of Bret Brown. They also made many opportunistic moves but I think Hinkie would have passed the IT deal by for the good of the tank.

He literally did.  Sixers could have kept IT in that trade but they decided that they'd rather not.


Great words from a great man

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #68 on: January 08, 2017, 08:10:38 PM »

Offline LarBrd33

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If the following things are true:

1. Your enjoyment from watching a good but not Championship-level team is exactly 0

2. You are confident that the league won't change the rules mid-stream and screw you over

Then I agree that the optimal strategy is to trade everyone, draft players, trade every one of those players who won't be a superstar, draft more players, and repeat until you have a critical mass of superstars. 

Follow boom-bust cycles where you are the worst team in the league for 5~8 years, and then are hopefully really good for 5~8 years.
As good as Boston is right now, they aren't yet a true contender.  And while I truly hope that changes soon, it's not at all far fetched that we could see a scenario where teams like the timberwolves and 76ers become true contenders before we do.   This isn't a straight forward race.  A single superstar acquisition changes everything.  We should win 55 games this season.  Without a major addition, we might be a 50-55 win team for a while.   We've seen teams jump from 20 to 60 wins rapidly.   We could still get lapped.

That part in bold is what you're trying to say, right?
no.  I love watching this non-contender probably almost as much as Philly fans are enjoying watching their non-contender right now.   Both fan bases are lit right now.  I'm just saying that if the goal is to be a real contender, both teams aren't there yet.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2017, 08:19:05 PM by LarBrd33 »

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #69 on: January 08, 2017, 08:36:42 PM »

Offline eja117

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If the following things are true:

1. Your enjoyment from watching a good but not Championship-level team is exactly 0

2. You are confident that the league won't change the rules mid-stream and screw you over

Then I agree that the optimal strategy is to trade everyone, draft players, trade every one of those players who won't be a superstar, draft more players, and repeat until you have a critical mass of superstars. 

Follow boom-bust cycles where you are the worst team in the league for 5~8 years, and then are hopefully really good for 5~8 years.
As good as Boston is right now, they aren't yet a true contender.  And while I truly hope that changes soon, it's not at all far fetched that we could see a scenario where teams like the timberwolves and 76ers become true contenders before we do.   This isn't a straight forward race.  A single superstar acquisition changes everything.  We should win 55 games this season.  Without a major addition, we might be a 50-55 win team for a while.   We've seen teams jump from 20 to 60 wins rapidly.   We could still get lapped.
Great. Let's see it

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #70 on: January 08, 2017, 08:43:10 PM »

Online Vermont Green

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I don't get all the consternation over this.  Philly has a stable of good young (some great young in Embiid and Simmons) players and is still looking at some really good picks in the next couple of years.  That stable includes Okafor and Noel.  I find it strange the way they are handling minutes (playing either Noel or Okafor but not finding a way to play both) but I don't think they are showcasing to the rest of the NBA, they just care more about finding out what they have than winning right now.

The Celtics are not going to become a true title contender with a team built around IT and Horford but they can continue to be a winning team while rebuilding around the Nets picks.

The Sixers have their stable but the Celtics have theirs too in Smart, Brown, and the two upcoming Nets picks.  We are in good shape too.  There could be a transformational player in our stable.  The Sixers may or may not already have one or two in Embiid and Simmons.  The difference is that the Celtics have not been a pathetic perennial loser for multiple seasons like the Sixers. 

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2017, 08:59:40 PM »

Offline eja117

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I don't get all the consternation over this.  Philly has a stable of good young (some great young in Embiid and Simmons) players and is still looking at some really good picks in the next couple of years.  That stable includes Okafor and Noel.  I find it strange the way they are handling minutes (playing either Noel or Okafor but not finding a way to play both) but I don't think they are showcasing to the rest of the NBA, they just care more about finding out what they have than winning right now.

The Celtics are not going to become a true title contender with a team built around IT and Horford but they can continue to be a winning team while rebuilding around the Nets picks.

The Sixers have their stable but the Celtics have theirs too in Smart, Brown, and the two upcoming Nets picks.  We are in good shape too.  There could be a transformational player in our stable.  The Sixers may or may not already have one or two in Embiid and Simmons.  The difference is that the Celtics have not been a pathetic perennial loser for multiple seasons like the Sixers.
See this is the difference between the Sixers, NO, and the T Wolves. The T Wolves are showing everyone they have three excellent young pieces and a decent young prospect or two. NO is showing they have a dominant young piece and another young prospect or two. The Sixers are showing they are a horrid young team with no direction and maybe a piece or two if they are lucky. And maybe one or two more pieces if they are very lucky.

You call NO or the T Wolves and the phone call goes like this..."Hey it's the Celtics! We'd like to discuss one or two of your best young pieces and in return....hello? Hello?"

You call the Sixers and the phone call is totally different....because...they ....missed...their sell high point.

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #72 on: January 08, 2017, 09:11:41 PM »

Offline footey

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"a losing culture can be hard to break is a good argument if it weren't for examples of losing teams that became winners.   You recall what happened to the Wickes/Rowe Cs once 23 yo Larry Bird got here. Losing culture dies quickly when dominant players begin to dominate"

You just ruined your own argument. One big reason that the 1980 Celtics turned things around was that Wicks and Rowe and their attitudes were gone. Fitch and Larry took care of those problems in training camp.
its actually very true. Losing cultures disappear as soon as the stars hit their stride.  Happened with the cavs. Happened with Oklahoma. Happened with the clippers.  Etc.

Philly is set up majestically heading forward.  Last I checked, since both Boston and philly started tanking, those two teams have the same amount of playoff series wins.  That should change this season I assume, but I fully expect barring injury Philly to be in the playoffs and making noise within the next few years.   Their culture has already changed since the arrival of Embiid. That team and its fanbase is lit.  Only a matter of time before the minutes restrictions lift, their other franchise player returns and they figure out how to get some wins consistently.

To equate Philly tanking with our tanking is nonsense and done to inflame Celtic fans. Nice.

You are the worst prognosticator on this blog, so your predictions as to Philly's future carry as much weight as your predictions about the Nets: Zilch.
we both started tanking at the same time. It's a fact.  Philly traded their lone borderline star for Noel and saric. We traded two hall of famers for draft picks, another allstar for draft picks, another top player for draft picks... and our reward was Marcus smart. Their reward was Embiid. Boston then quickly became decent while philly kept collecting potential stars (okafor and Simmons).    It's been a few years and neither team has won a playoff series.  We should win one this year.  I suspect Philly will too in the next few years.

We had one really bad season, 13/14. Sixer played bad from 12/13 through 16/17. That's five years in a row. That's a fact, kid. Choose your words more carefully.
listen grandpappy, the only relevant fact you just brought up is that Philly was mediocre to bad for decades before they tanked that season. Boston was breaking up a contender and had significantly more assets to deal.   They traded away three all stars and Jeff green for assets.  Philly's only real asset was jrue holiday and they were actually missing picks when they started tanking.

Nonetheless, it's entirely accurate to say both teams started tanking the same season.   By definition, if you trade all your best players for picks - you're tanking... no matter what some arbitrary "rebuilding" designation you want to give it.  You really don't get any more quintessential "tanking" than trading away an entire contender and intentionally bottoming out with a bottom 3 record.   That marked the second time of Danny's tenure they intentionally tanked (they did it in 2007) and the third noteable tankjob of this franchise (1997).   Also, if you real any quotes from Ainge during the 2014 season, it's blatantly clear the team intended to bottom out that season as well, but Thomas fell into our lap, our young role players exceeded expectations and Brad Stevens coached them into the playoffs with a below .500 record.

It is what it is.  We are positioned as well as any team in the league heading forward thanks to our uncanny luck moving our hall of famers for future picks that now are conveying extremely high.   It's a great position to be in.  But it's notable that neither Philly or Boston have won a playoff series since they began their tank job.   Boston got mediocre quicker than Philly and now they are a top 10 team ... it looks like Philly will catch up within the next few years - which is remarkable considering they started with 1/6th the assets Boston did in 2013 when both teams intentionally tanked.

The Celtics were no longer a contender when they traded away Pierce, Garnett, and Terry.  They won 41 games that year and lost in the first round of the playoffs to the Knicks.  All 3 players were well past their primes.

You act as if the Celtics and 76ers have been in the same boat the past two seasons because neither won a playoff series, but that is absurd.  They Celtics averaged 44 wins per season while Philly averaged 14.  This year, the Celtics have 23 wins to their 10 wins.  Maybe, you don't care about that, but I think most people who watch games do.  And the coach and players on the team certainly do as well.

Don't confuse him. LOL

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #73 on: January 08, 2017, 09:21:20 PM »

Online Vermont Green

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You call NO or the T Wolves and the phone call goes like this..."Hey it's the Celtics! We'd like to discuss one or two of your best young pieces and in return....hello? Hello?"

You call the Sixers and the phone call is totally different....because...they ....missed...their sell high point.

I agree if you call about Towns or Davis that the conversation will be very short but that is no different than if you call Philly about Embiid or Simmons (or their pick this coming draft).  It is different if you call Philly about Okafor or Noel, their 4th or 5th best assets.  If you call NO or Minni about their 4th or 5th best asset, I think they talk.  You can't compare Towns and Davis to Noel and Okafor.  Simply different tiers high or low point.

Re: The Sixers missed their sell high moment
« Reply #74 on: January 08, 2017, 09:38:08 PM »

Offline Ilikesports17

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The Celtics won more game last year than Philly did in the 13/14, 14/15, 15/16 seasons put together.

Championships trump all, but if these teams end up with even comparable success the Celtics come out wayyyy on top.
Quote from: George W. Bush
Too often, we judge other groups by their worst examples while judging ourselves by our best intentions.