Author Topic: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners  (Read 1725 times)

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Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« on: August 19, 2016, 07:18:08 PM »

Offline triboy16f

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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2016, 07:59:45 PM »

Online fairweatherfan

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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2016, 08:22:00 PM »

Offline BlastFromThePast

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This is what she looks like after plastic surgery.  Note the "duck lips", not just the enhanced cleavage.   :o


Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2016, 10:22:16 PM »

Offline go11celtics

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http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/thoughtful-animal/why-bronze-medalists-are-happier-than-silver-winners/

Agree or disagree?

Absolutely agree, especially in sports like basketball where you lose your last game compared to win your last game. Silver=so close, bronze= Just happy to medal.

Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2016, 10:36:19 PM »

Online fairweatherfan

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This is what she looks like after plastic surgery.  Note the "duck lips", not just the enhanced cleavage.   :o



Are you saying if she'd gotten bronze she wouldn't be morphing into Lindsay Lohan?

Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2016, 10:37:58 PM »

Offline alldaboston

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Bronze medalists are coming off a win in their bronze medal match (unless we're talking track or swim or stuff), while silver medalists are coming off a loss, so that also contributes to happiness levels differing.
I could very well see the Hawks... starting Taurean Prince at the 3, who is already better than Crowder, imo.

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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2016, 11:40:16 PM »

Offline manl_lui

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http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/thoughtful-animal/why-bronze-medalists-are-happier-than-silver-winners/

Agree or disagree?

Absolutely agree, especially in sports like basketball where you lose your last game compared to win your last game. Silver=so close, bronze= Just happy to medal.

I agree with this also, I played volleyball in college and getting 2nd hurts. Sure you're second best to some eyes but to you personally, that doesn't matter because to you, you're ONE game away (well a set or two) away from being the BEST team. The closer you are, the more it hurts, that's why you're more likely to see players cry after they lose a finals than players who loses in the 1st or 2nd round in the playoffs. Because you are that close and you do believe you will win the chip

Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2016, 01:45:25 AM »

Offline Adelaide Celt

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I said pretty much this in the Olympic basketball thread. Not sure about individual sports but as far as basketball goes, winning the bronze would have to feel better than losing and getting silver.
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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2016, 01:49:45 PM »

Offline Moranis

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The problem with the study is it includes match play vs. single event situations.  In match play, the Bronze medal winner(s) are coming off a victory while the Silver medal winner(s) are coming off a loss, which of course affects the human outcome because the Silver medalist thinks, I should have won the Gold while the Bronze medalist is just happy to not finish in 4th with no medal.  What you really need to see is the Bronze medal winner(s) after losing the semi-final match and thus eliminating the chance for gold.  The only people sadder than that is the semi-final loser that loses in the Bronze medal match.  I would bet the single event situations produce far different results than the match play, something I didn't see the study single out. 
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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2016, 02:23:40 PM »

Online fairweatherfan

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The problem with the study is it includes match play vs. single event situations.  In match play, the Bronze medal winner(s) are coming off a victory while the Silver medal winner(s) are coming off a loss, which of course affects the human outcome because the Silver medalist thinks, I should have won the Gold while the Bronze medalist is just happy to not finish in 4th with no medal.  What you really need to see is the Bronze medal winner(s) after losing the semi-final match and thus eliminating the chance for gold.  The only people sadder than that is the semi-final loser that loses in the Bronze medal match.  I would bet the single event situations produce far different results than the match play, something I didn't see the study single out.

I've read the actual study; they do exactly the single/match event split you're describing (odd to expect such a basic objection never would've come up) and find the relationship holds for both forms of event.  They also looked at expression both immediately after the event and on the medal stand. 

http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/keith.chen/negot.%20papers/MedvecMadeyGilovich_ContFactSatisf95.pdf  Page 6.

Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2016, 02:24:36 PM »

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Of course, they do.  They pay less in taxes.


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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2016, 02:52:58 PM »

Offline Moranis

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The problem with the study is it includes match play vs. single event situations.  In match play, the Bronze medal winner(s) are coming off a victory while the Silver medal winner(s) are coming off a loss, which of course affects the human outcome because the Silver medalist thinks, I should have won the Gold while the Bronze medalist is just happy to not finish in 4th with no medal.  What you really need to see is the Bronze medal winner(s) after losing the semi-final match and thus eliminating the chance for gold.  The only people sadder than that is the semi-final loser that loses in the Bronze medal match.  I would bet the single event situations produce far different results than the match play, something I didn't see the study single out.

I've read the actual study; they do exactly the single/match event split you're describing (odd to expect such a basic objection never would've come up) and find the relationship holds for both forms of event.  They also looked at expression both immediately after the event and on the medal stand. 

http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/keith.chen/negot.%20papers/MedvecMadeyGilovich_ContFactSatisf95.pdf  Page 6.
ah thanks.  The article didn't mention the stats dividing the line.  Seems odd that a single event vs. match play would yield similar results.  Really doesn't make any sense, especially when the single events aren't that close with a clear winner (think Ledecky, the marathon, etc. from the most recent Olympics, etc.).  I mean I get it if the Silver Medal loses the gold by .01 seconds or something like that or if a heavy favorite only takes the Silver, but in general it really doesn't make sense why it would like that in a single event (race) system.
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Re: Why Bronze Medalists Are Happier Than Silver Winners
« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2016, 03:50:54 PM »

Online fairweatherfan

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The problem with the study is it includes match play vs. single event situations.  In match play, the Bronze medal winner(s) are coming off a victory while the Silver medal winner(s) are coming off a loss, which of course affects the human outcome because the Silver medalist thinks, I should have won the Gold while the Bronze medalist is just happy to not finish in 4th with no medal.  What you really need to see is the Bronze medal winner(s) after losing the semi-final match and thus eliminating the chance for gold.  The only people sadder than that is the semi-final loser that loses in the Bronze medal match.  I would bet the single event situations produce far different results than the match play, something I didn't see the study single out.

I've read the actual study; they do exactly the single/match event split you're describing (odd to expect such a basic objection never would've come up) and find the relationship holds for both forms of event.  They also looked at expression both immediately after the event and on the medal stand. 

http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/keith.chen/negot.%20papers/MedvecMadeyGilovich_ContFactSatisf95.pdf  Page 6.
ah thanks.  The article didn't mention the stats dividing the line.  Seems odd that a single event vs. match play would yield similar results.  Really doesn't make any sense, especially when the single events aren't that close with a clear winner (think Ledecky, the marathon, etc. from the most recent Olympics, etc.).  I mean I get it if the Silver Medal loses the gold by .01 seconds or something like that or if a heavy favorite only takes the Silver, but in general it really doesn't make sense why it would like that in a single event (race) system.

I think blowouts are a lot less common in race events than close finishes, or at least finishes close enough that 2nd place can easily dwell on a mistake or two they could've avoided and won.  Most races are so short time-wise that a tight finish is almost inevitable.  Similarly bronze medalists more often than not finish very close to 4th and out of the medals entirely. 


...all that said, I happened across a funny video of maybe the most improbable gold medal ever.  I won't  tell you what happens except that the fun starts around 1:30 and apparently it was the guy's strategy to hope this happened. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAADWfJO2qM