Author Topic: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread  (Read 16976 times)

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Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #105 on: March 01, 2018, 05:29:16 PM »

Offline Redz

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I have to bury a chicken this morning.


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Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #106 on: March 01, 2018, 06:40:06 PM »

Offline Jiri Welsch

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I have to bury a chicken this morning.



RIP Chick. You were loved.
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Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #107 on: March 01, 2018, 08:54:48 PM »

Offline Redz

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I have to bury a chicken this morning.



RIP Chick. You were loved.

We've probably had 20 something chickens over the years.  This is the first we've given a space of honor in the woods behind our yard.  "Lucky" was the sole survivor of a gory attack on our coop a few years back.  She managed to re-integrate with a couple more groups of chickens.  Her secret was always taking the highest roost position at night.  Never the top of the pecking order, but she had a keen sense for survival.

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Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #108 on: March 02, 2018, 07:52:42 AM »

Offline Surferdad

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Our metrowest town is classified as an "agricultural community" which means there is a low bar to having animals or starting a farm.  We could have chickens and goats pretty easily and might do something like that someday when I have the time (retirement).

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #109 on: March 04, 2018, 12:19:26 AM »

Offline Redz

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Our metrowest town is classified as an "agricultural community" which means there is a low bar to having animals or starting a farm.  We could have chickens and goats pretty easily and might do something like that someday when I have the time (retirement).

Chickens are very low maintenance, and the eggs are awesome.  Plus they chomp down all of your leftover food and turn it into more food or fertilizer, which is pretty cool.

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Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #110 on: June 26, 2018, 09:28:46 AM »

Offline Surferdad

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NBA season is over, and the off-season speculation is a bit tiresome, so I'm reigniting this thread.

Anybody else working on their yard/garden this spring/summer?  I've spent the last two weekends planting perennials and spreading mulch on the beds.  The hard part is pulling the weeds BEFORE spreading mulch.  In some areas, I've also dug out the old mulch that has turned into ugly dirt. 

This is all backbreaking work, but at least I'm getting exercise and fresh air.  I do pay for a lawn maintenance company to do the feeding and other treatments, but I mow it myself.  We generally avoid lots of chemicals in the yard, but unfortunately we recently had to get a treatment done for gypsy moths.  I would go out in the yard and literally hear them chewing.  It sounded like a light rain.  Very disturbing.  They were threatening to chew up all our deciduous trees and we have many that are 50+ year old giants. 

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #111 on: June 26, 2018, 09:38:37 AM »

Offline SHAQATTACK

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finally got rid of 90% of the dollar weed overtaking my yard.

all these nights of east coast rain storms is growing a beautiful yard once again.

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #112 on: August 05, 2018, 07:17:14 AM »

Offline Surferdad

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finally got rid of 90% of the dollar weed overtaking my yard.

all these nights of east coast rain storms is growing a beautiful yard once again.
Yesterday's rain, combined with predicted hot-and-sunny weather for Sunday is gonna make the yard 'pop'.  Our new plantings are grateful.  Definitely some mowing on the agenda today.

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #113 on: September 08, 2018, 06:21:23 PM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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Help!  My lawn is being overtaken by what I think is Ground Ivy.   It's possibly Mallow, but I think Ground Ivy.   Standard weed/feed fertilizer doesn't impact it; and no luck with targeted weed sprays or crabgrass spray.   It's become so pervasive that pulling is painstaking -- also, hard to know if I am getting the roots.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate?   



Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #114 on: September 08, 2018, 07:23:00 PM »

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Help!  My lawn is being overtaken by what I think is Ground Ivy.   It's possibly Mallow, but I think Ground Ivy.   Standard weed/feed fertilizer doesn't impact it; and no luck with targeted weed sprays or crabgrass spray.   It's become so pervasive that pulling is painstaking -- also, hard to know if I am getting the roots.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate?
Skip the weed/feed or chem solution.
Best approach is to go to a good seed store and ask them for a park/conservation seed mix with red clover. If they donít have it the should be able to mix it for you. In the spring pull as much of the ivy as you can, seed and cover with pen mulch or chopped straw. Water regularly and wait. requires a bit of elbow grease but results in a healthier lower maintenance yard.

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #115 on: September 08, 2018, 08:51:22 PM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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Help!  My lawn is being overtaken by what I think is Ground Ivy.   It's possibly Mallow, but I think Ground Ivy.   Standard weed/feed fertilizer doesn't impact it; and no luck with targeted weed sprays or crabgrass spray.   It's become so pervasive that pulling is painstaking -- also, hard to know if I am getting the roots.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate?
Skip the weed/feed or chem solution.
Best approach is to go to a good seed store and ask them for a park/conservation seed mix with red clover. If they donít have it the should be able to mix it for you. In the spring pull as much of the ivy as you can, seed and cover with pen mulch or chopped straw. Water regularly and wait. requires a bit of elbow grease but results in a healthier lower maintenance yard.

Do you use pen mulch in place of starter fertilizer?

Pulling the ivy will be a chore and a half. Endless. Also hard to be sure I've pulled the roots as the ivy breaks easily (maybe that won't matter?).   

Is it not worth it to pull and seed in the fall?


Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #116 on: September 08, 2018, 09:57:07 PM »

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Help!  My lawn is being overtaken by what I think is Ground Ivy.   It's possibly Mallow, but I think Ground Ivy.   Standard weed/feed fertilizer doesn't impact it; and no luck with targeted weed sprays or crabgrass spray.   It's become so pervasive that pulling is painstaking -- also, hard to know if I am getting the roots.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate?
Skip the weed/feed or chem solution.
Best approach is to go to a good seed store and ask them for a park/conservation seed mix with red clover. If they donít have it the should be able to mix it for you. In the spring pull as much of the ivy as you can, seed and cover with pen mulch or chopped straw. Water regularly and wait. requires a bit of elbow grease but results in a healthier lower maintenance yard.

Do you use pen mulch in place of starter fertilizer?

Pulling the ivy will be a chore and a half. Endless. Also hard to be sure I've pulled the roots as the ivy breaks easily (maybe that won't matter?).   

Is it not worth it to pull and seed in the fall?
Pen Mulch is a moisture retaining mulch made from paper that keeps germinating seeds moist and shady.
I rarely fertilize, a diverse mix of grasses and nitrogen fixing clover helps creates healthy soils.  If the lawn shows stress iíll augment with a bit of lime in fall or the following  spring.

Pulling the ivy in the fall canít hurt and winter may kill some of the exposed  roots, but donít seed till spring unless you a do it a month before frost, even then iíd want to mix in an annual winter rye to help protect the seeds through the winter.

I wouldnít worry about the roots too much, not much you can do short of napalm.
The method I recommend uses the clovers tendencies to outcompete the invader.
Clover will come in fast and thick. Roots spread fast and crowd out the ivy. Over the summer ivy will come up through the clover. Pull it as you see it, the clover will fill the gap. Once clover is established  mow short. Clover leaves are lower thank the ivy. By mowing short you force the plant to spend energy reserves stored in the roots to send up new leaves instead of expanding its root system. This ďcarbon starvingĒ stops expansion quickly, weakens itís ability to recover, and, over a year or two, can kill off the plant.
Over the same few years the grass seed in your mix takes hold in and around the clover roots. together they form  a healthy root system that will keep the ivy at bay.

 

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #117 on: September 08, 2018, 10:17:35 PM »

Offline Neurotic Guy

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Help!  My lawn is being overtaken by what I think is Ground Ivy.   It's possibly Mallow, but I think Ground Ivy.   Standard weed/feed fertilizer doesn't impact it; and no luck with targeted weed sprays or crabgrass spray.   It's become so pervasive that pulling is painstaking -- also, hard to know if I am getting the roots.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate?
Skip the weed/feed or chem solution.
Best approach is to go to a good seed store and ask them for a park/conservation seed mix with red clover. If they donít have it the should be able to mix it for you. In the spring pull as much of the ivy as you can, seed and cover with pen mulch or chopped straw. Water regularly and wait. requires a bit of elbow grease but results in a healthier lower maintenance yard.

Do you use pen mulch in place of starter fertilizer?

Pulling the ivy will be a chore and a half. Endless. Also hard to be sure I've pulled the roots as the ivy breaks easily (maybe that won't matter?).   

Is it not worth it to pull and seed in the fall?
Pen Mulch is a moisture retaining mulch made from paper that keeps germinating seeds moist and shady.
I rarely fertilize, a diverse mix of grasses and nitrogen fixing clover helps creates healthy soils.  If the lawn shows stress iíll augment with a bit of lime in fall or the following  spring.

Pulling the ivy in the fall canít hurt and winter may kill some of the exposed  roots, but donít seed till spring unless you a do it a month before frost, even then iíd want to mix in an annual winter rye to help protect the seeds through the winter.

I wouldnít worry about the roots too much, not much you can do short of napalm.
The method I recommend uses the clovers tendencies to outcompete the invader.
Clover will come in fast and thick. Roots spread fast and crowd out the ivy. Over the summer ivy will come up through the clover. Pull it as you see it, the clover will fill the gap. Once clover is established  mow short. Clover leaves are lower thank the ivy. By mowing short you force the plant to spend energy reserves stored in the roots to send up new leaves instead of expanding its root system. This ďcarbon starvingĒ stops expansion quickly, weakens itís ability to recover, and, over a year or two, can kill off the plant.
Over the same few years the grass seed in your mix takes hold in and around the clover roots. together they form  a healthy root system that will keep the ivy at bay.

Well... wow...  and TP.   Thanks!

Re: Yard work/homeowner stuff thread
« Reply #118 on: September 08, 2018, 10:52:12 PM »

Online FatKidsDad

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Help!  My lawn is being overtaken by what I think is Ground Ivy.   It's possibly Mallow, but I think Ground Ivy.   Standard weed/feed fertilizer doesn't impact it; and no luck with targeted weed sprays or crabgrass spray.   It's become so pervasive that pulling is painstaking -- also, hard to know if I am getting the roots.

Any suggestions on how to eliminate?
Skip the weed/feed or chem solution.
Best approach is to go to a good seed store and ask them for a park/conservation seed mix with red clover. If they donít have it the should be able to mix it for you. In the spring pull as much of the ivy as you can, seed and cover with pen mulch or chopped straw. Water regularly and wait. requires a bit of elbow grease but results in a healthier lower maintenance yard.

Do you use pen mulch in place of starter fertilizer?

Pulling the ivy will be a chore and a half. Endless. Also hard to be sure I've pulled the roots as the ivy breaks easily (maybe that won't matter?).   

Is it not worth it to pull and seed in the fall?
Pen Mulch is a moisture retaining mulch made from paper that keeps germinating seeds moist and shady.
I rarely fertilize, a diverse mix of grasses and nitrogen fixing clover helps creates healthy soils.  If the lawn shows stress iíll augment with a bit of lime in fall or the following  spring.

Pulling the ivy in the fall canít hurt and winter may kill some of the exposed  roots, but donít seed till spring unless you a do it a month before frost, even then iíd want to mix in an annual winter rye to help protect the seeds through the winter.

I wouldnít worry about the roots too much, not much you can do short of napalm.
The method I recommend uses the clovers tendencies to outcompete the invader.
Clover will come in fast and thick. Roots spread fast and crowd out the ivy. Over the summer ivy will come up through the clover. Pull it as you see it, the clover will fill the gap. Once clover is established  mow short. Clover leaves are lower thank the ivy. By mowing short you force the plant to spend energy reserves stored in the roots to send up new leaves instead of expanding its root system. This ďcarbon starvingĒ stops expansion quickly, weakens itís ability to recover, and, over a year or two, can kill off the plant.
Over the same few years the grass seed in your mix takes hold in and around the clover roots. together they form  a healthy root system that will keep the ivy at bay.

Well... wow...  and TP.   Thanks!
Or get some little lambs.

They eat ivy ;)
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