Author Topic: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song  (Read 8869 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Re: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song
« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2014, 11:39:01 AM »

Offline pearljammer10

  • Frank Ramsey
  • ************
  • Posts: 12241
  • Tommy Points: 831
Great summer discussion diversion!

I agree with the majority when I think of covers of Hallelujah --I think of Jeff Buckley and sadly his drowning adds to the feeling, honestly makes me listen to the song less often to avoid the sad emotion.

This is my feeling on it as well. I used to listen to this song on repeat and playing it live any chance I could get. At this point, the emotions just get the best of me and even though I love it and respect the crap out of it, I shelve it at this point.


CB Draft 2016:
PG:Tony Parker/Mo Williams
SG:Alec Burks/Manu Ginobili
SF:Al Farouq-Aminu/Jared Dudley/Tony Snell
PF:Dirk Nowitzki/JaMychal Green
C: Deandre Jordan/Roy Hibbert/Alex Len

Re: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song
« Reply #31 on: July 24, 2014, 11:56:58 AM »

Offline Donoghus

  • Global Moderator
  • Dave Cowens
  • ***********************
  • Posts: 23119
  • Tommy Points: 950
  • What a Pub Should Be
Jeff Buckley and it shouldn't even be a debate.

Fenway used it in a Boston Strong tribute after the marathon bombing.  Real powerful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlUUoIUJL8E


2010 CB Historical Draft - Best Overall Team

Re: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song
« Reply #32 on: July 24, 2014, 07:22:32 PM »

Offline Beat LA

  • Paul Silas
  • ******
  • Posts: 6507
  • Tommy Points: 649
  • Mr. Emoji
This to me is the best cover to the song there is. 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zEqWw4IQWA

I love the fact that she didn't try to do too much with the song.  She sang it straight with a lot of feelings and her great voice.  She picked her spots in the song and I love the feeling of hopelessness she displayed in the song, in her voice, and her facial expression and body language.

I listened to it, and, although she does have a great voice, I still prefer the voice of the person about whom I made a thread, in which you commented.  I realize that, yes, this is all subjective in terms of preference, but I was wondering if you could elaborate, to the untrained and unqualified in this arena (read: me), as to the difference(s) between these two gifted artists.  I'm not trying to start an argument here, I'm simply curious.  I did get chills, though.  Her voice was simply...WOW :o  It was another instrument in that cover.

Your girl have pitch problems when she sings, meaning she sings out of tune.  This girl singing hallelujah has perfect pitch all through.  Your girl just sings all through her songs, this girl has progression and picks her spots (such as 4:07, 4:30, 5:47, 6:06).  This girl's vocal strength is through the roof.  I don't need to have her sing at a higher note to know that she can hit it just from her vocal strength and her performance in this song.  I can bet my money your girl would have problems with higher notes.  Then there are intangibles like the feel...which usually has a lot to do with melody of a song or connection with it (mind you, song choice is very important as well), how you attack each verse, mouth to mic ratio when you go high (this is a fundamental any good singer should know), connection with audience (if you have one), how you begin and end it (this girl did great).

On a side note, you must really like the girl in question.  Thing is...no singer is perfect.  The closest to perfection in my honest opinion is Celine Dion and Whitney Houston with Christina Aguilera been a close third (because of her  prowess in chest belting among other things she's great at).  They had to learn and get better and that comes with years of singing, practicing, and honing one's skill.

Oh yeah, Christina Aguilera is phenomenal.  Easily the best voice of her generation, but I can see how it's a definite tossup between her and Whitney Houston.  Titanic aside, I've never listened to Celine Dion, or Whitney Houston, or Christina, for that matter, as theirs just isn't my kind of music.  The latter two of the three keep showing up on the radio and such, however, so it's kind of hard to avoid them, unfortunately.

Thank you for the analysis and explanation, btw.  I'm surprised that I actually even knew some of the most basic components of singing and feel for the the song, etc, that you described, haha.  However, and I realize that this was likely not intentional on your part, but please stop saying, "my girl."  I don't know her, nor do I own her.  She's a human being, not a trophy or a piece of property.  I don't think that that's what you were trying to say, but that's how it came across to me.

Last thing about the girl in the hallelujah video - how would you describe her voice?  Combined with her body language and facial expressions, I'd say it was deep, vulnerable, and at times, hauntingly intoxicating.  How awful is that assessment, haha?

Lol.  I apologize for assuming that you knew her or even liked her (I was going by how persistent you are about her in particular).  However, I don't see how saying "your girl" mean I'm refering to her being your property.  I won't indulge in this politically correctness just to pander to society's increasing oversensitivity to things like this.  Just like how females usually say "he's my man."  It's just a term of endearment.

This girl singing hallelujah, I don't know the story of her life but I would guess she sang that song from a place of hurt or pain which is the message of the song.  Besides the ocassional stare she gave the guitar player (which is a needed cue for duo who hasn't been together for long), she stares dead into space and looks down like she's recalling events in her life.  Now this may be me reading too much into it but I doubt it because it translates into how great the song turned out

No, I understand that, but because that's not the case here, it just made me a bit uncomfortable.  It's okay, though.  All's forgiven now that we understand each other :)

It's also interesting that you should mention that about the vibe that she's giving off during the video, because if you read one of, if not, the, very first comments under the video on youtube, that's exactly what someone else, who called himself, "a concerned father," I believe, said, so it's not just you.  Let's hope that that is not the case
« Last Edit: July 24, 2014, 07:38:49 PM by Beat LA »

Re: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song
« Reply #33 on: July 24, 2014, 07:43:53 PM »

Offline Clench123

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3055
  • Tommy Points: 251
Great summer discussion diversion!

I agree with the majority when I think of covers of Hallelujah --I think of Jeff Buckley and sadly his drowning adds to the feeling, honestly makes me listen to the song less often to avoid the sad emotion.

Which is why I think majority keeps mentioning him as the best cover for the song.  An artist's legendary status is bound to grow exponentially in death (happens with Amy Winehouse and many others).  Technically I don't see it but to each his own.

I always said when I left the Celtics, I could not go to heaven, because that would
 be a step down. I am pure 100 percent Celtic. I think if you slashed my wrists, my
 blood would’ve been green.  -  Bill "Greatest of All Time" Russell

Re: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song
« Reply #34 on: July 24, 2014, 07:51:37 PM »

Offline SaCaCh

  • Jayson Tatum
  • Posts: 388
  • Tommy Points: 46
Buckley by a mile...loved it before he died and after.

Re: Best version of Leonard Cohen Hallelujah song
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2014, 08:40:22 PM »

Offline TBreezy

  • Brad Stevens
  • Posts: 272
  • Tommy Points: 23
Its not only the haunting vocals but also the altered chords that make it so interesting...