Author Topic: OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid  (Read 6404 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid
« on: May 15, 2008, 02:30:49 PM »

Offline Amonkey

  • Bill Walton
  • *
  • Posts: 1452
  • Tommy Points: 150
When I saw the story on Sportscenter, the whole OJ Mayo is a new twist to me for student-athletes getting paid.  I always thought it was unfair for students not to get paid (especially with the new rule imposed), but I also dont think that schools should give them financial benefits besides scholarships so all schools have an opportunity to grab a elite recruiter.

However, I never thought of students getting paid through the agency.  That is something interesting to me.  I think that could also be the solution for these students athletes to get paid but not from the school.

This is what I was thinking of a rule that could be implemented.  How about something of sorts of what OJ did.  A student athlete would be allowed to receive a limited amount of money from an agency (like 10-20 grand) for the year.  The student can only do that to one agency and he would fill a "letter of intent" that would mean that he'd be thinking of getting an agent from that agency once he becomes a pro.

However, this letter of intent would have no legal obligation.  It just states that the student would like to represented  by that agency, but if he changes his mind once he becomes a pro, then theres nothing the agency can do.

I believe that way would give the student the upper hand for once.  The agency would have to evaluate if the kid is really that good and if he's worth it.  It would also be a risk for the agency.  By the kid accepting the money, it would be a sign of good faith that he'll turn to them once he becomes pro, but nothing for sure.

That would completely take the school out of the equation and just make it into a no-risk business for the student.  Instead of taking money from the taxpayers, he'd be taking money from a private business that could very well benefit from this.  Also, that would have no impact on where the kid would go to school. 

What do you guys think?
Baby Jesus!

Re: OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2008, 02:37:07 PM »

Offline Celtic

  • Ray Allen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3727
  • Tommy Points: 49
  • TRANSFORMATION INTO CHAMPION COMPLETE!!!
I don't really have a problem with it, but I don't really have a problem with student athletes being paid in the first place. When children are getting scholarships in the eighth now, and colleges are making so much money from their players, it's hard to justify that the players should not benefit from the situation they are creating, it really is a business.

Re: OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2008, 02:39:13 PM »

Offline indeedproceed

  • In The Rafters
  • James Naismith
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 41655
  • Tommy Points: 2341
  • You ain't the boss of the freakin' bedclothes.
I think its not a good idea, because it gives the kids complete power. Well let me rephrase, I think its a great idea but impossible because if it was actually a rule there is no obligation for the kids. What if they say no? Shouldn't the agency be able to sue like a signing bonus in football? I don't like the idea of any of these kids being indebted to someone before they even enter the league. The age rule is a sham. The kids should go to Europe and the DL

Its ridiculous that anyone should be up in arms about this though. Blame OJ Mayo? if he would've worked a $10 an hour job 40 hours a week for a year he'd make roughly what he (allegedly) got from this agency.

Mayo's character is a pleasant surprise for me this year. The kid off the court has shown poise, saavy and sensibility, none of which you would've expected.

"You've gotta respect a 15-percent 3-point shooter. A guy
like that is always lethal." - Evan 'The God' Turner

Re: OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2008, 02:45:30 PM »

Offline Roy Hobbs

  • In The Rafters
  • The Natural
  • *********************************
  • Posts: 33333
  • Tommy Points: 6430
  • Doc could learn a thing or two from Norman Dale
Eh.  I'm still of the outdated opinion that these guys are getting paid with $40,000 per year college education, plus the spending stipend that they're given (which isn't much, but it's still spending money.)

How do you determine how much each player gets?  Under the classic, school-funded system, do they all get the same?  Is there a max?  Under the agent scenario, does the fact that some players are getting paid more than others create locker room discord? 

Certainly, the agent scenario isn't in the best interest of the kids who play sports; the agents are going to push the kids into decisions that maximize earning potential for the agency, not necessarily what's best for the kid.  For instance, if an agency was financing Tim Duncan, do you think he would have stayed at Wake Forest for four years?  Same with Tyler Hansborough, or whoever.  I find that doubtful, because the agency is going to want a return on its investment as soon as possible, and they're going to be pressuring the kid constantly.

Also, presuming that this is a proposal to stem the tide of schools / boosters giving kids under-the-table gifts and money, I don't see how this would stop that.  Let's say the most a school / agent can give a player is $20,000 per year.  What stops a crooked school / agency from offering a player more than that under the table?


All the negativity in this town sucks. It sucks, and it stinks, and it sucks. - Rick Pitino

Portland CrotoNats:  2009 CB Draft Champions

Re: OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2008, 03:12:32 PM »

Offline johnnyrondo

  • Antoine Walker
  • ****
  • Posts: 4038
  • Tommy Points: 1245
A lot has to do with Title IX.  You can't just pay MALE basketball players and football players. That would never be allowed fwiw.

Re: OJ Mayo/Student-athlete getting paid
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2008, 02:52:57 PM »

Offline Amonkey

  • Bill Walton
  • *
  • Posts: 1452
  • Tommy Points: 150
Quote
Eh.  I'm still of the outdated opinion that these guys are getting paid with $40,000 per year college education, plus the spending stipend that they're given (which isn't much, but it's still spending money.)

How do you determine how much each player gets?  Under the classic, school-funded system, do they all get the same?  Is there a max?  Under the agent scenario, does the fact that some players are getting paid more than others create locker room discord? 

Certainly, the agent scenario isn't in the best interest of the kids who play sports; the agents are going to push the kids into decisions that maximize earning potential for the agency, not necessarily what's best for the kid.  For instance, if an agency was financing Tim Duncan, do you think he would have stayed at Wake Forest for four years?  Same with Tyler Hansborough, or whoever.  I find that doubtful, because the agency is going to want a return on its investment as soon as possible, and they're going to be pressuring the kid constantly.

Also, presuming that this is a proposal to stem the tide of schools / boosters giving kids under-the-table gifts and money, I don't see how this would stop that.  Let's say the most a school / agent can give a player is $20,000 per year.  What stops a crooked school / agency from offering a player more than that under the table?

You make some good points.  There is obviously many kinks that would have to be worked out from this whole thing.  However, to add their tuition into that is assuming that these kids are actually going to class, which is completely useless for guys like OJ Mayo which is basically just waiting to go to the NBA to earn millions of dollars.
Baby Jesus!